24

I have the following code:

pid_t pid = fork();
if (pid == -1)
{
    // ...
}
else if (pid == 0)
{
    stdin = someopenfile;
    stdout = someotherfile;
    stderr = somethirdopenfile;
    execvp(args[0], args);
    // handle error ...
}
else
{
    // ...
}

The problem is, the input/output of the execvp() call is still the console, rather than the files. Clearly I am doing something wrong, what is the right way to do this?

3 Answers 3

47

The right way to do it is to replace the file descriptors STDIN_FILENO, STDOUT_FILENO and STDERR_FILENO with the opened files using dup2(). You should also then close the original files in the child process:

else if (pid == 0)
{
    dup2(fileno(someopenfile), STDIN_FILENO);
    dup2(fileno(someotherfile), STDOUT_FILENO);
    dup2(fileno(somethirdopenfile), STDERR_FILENO);
    fclose(someopenfile);
    fclose(someotheropenfile);
    fclose(somethirdopenfile);
    execvp(args[0], args);
    // handle error ...
}
5
  • 5
    Most syscalls can fail. dup2(2) is no exception. In particular it can fail with errno == EMFILE when reaching the file descriptor limit (which you could lower with ulimit bash builtin or setrlimit(2) syscall). Read kernel.org/doc/man-pages/online/pages/man2/dup2.2.html Jan 27, 2013 at 7:57
  • Don't original stdin/out/err need to be closed before doing this?
    – rustyx
    Jul 12, 2016 at 20:28
  • 2
    @rustyx: No, dup2() closes the destination file descriptor first if it's open.
    – caf
    Jul 13, 2016 at 0:06
  • 1
    How do you revert this?
    – ytobi
    Feb 23, 2019 at 12:54
  • @ytobi I'm sure you figured out by now, but the correct answer is using dup(), this duplicated descriptor can then be used in the same manner with dup2() to replace current file descriptors ones once more.
    – user11877195
    Mar 6 at 18:46
11

Take a look at freopen function.

I had to do something similar with stdout and wrote two functions that do the work for me:

static int fd;
static fpos_t pos;

void switchStdout(const char *newStream)
{
  fflush(stdout);
  fgetpos(stdout, &pos);
  fd = dup(fileno(stdout));
  freopen(newStream, "w", stdout);
}

void revertStdout()
{
  fflush(stdout);
  dup2(fd, fileno(stdout));
  close(fd);
  clearerr(stdout);
  fsetpos(stdout, &pos);
}
2

You can use this when stdin , stdout , stderr are terminal-

//change stdin,stdout,stderr
    freopen("new_stdin","r",stdin);
    freopen("new_stdout","r",stdout);
    freopen("new_stderr","r",stderr);

    //----do something;

//reset stdin,stdout,stderr
     freopen("/dev/tty","r",stdin);
     freopen("/dev/tty","r",stdout);
     freopen("/dev/tty","r",stderr);
0

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