125

I have string like this:

years<-c("20 years old", "1 years old")

I would like to grep only the numeric number from this vector. Expected output is a vector:

c(20, 1)

How do I go about doing this?

0

11 Answers 11

99

How about

# pattern is by finding a set of numbers in the start and capturing them
as.numeric(gsub("([0-9]+).*$", "\\1", years))

or

# pattern is to just remove _years_old
as.numeric(gsub(" years old", "", years))

or

# split by space, get the element in first index
as.numeric(sapply(strsplit(years, " "), "[[", 1))
4
  • 1
    Why is the .* necessary? If you want them at the start, why not use ^[[:digit:]]+? Jan 27 '13 at 2:13
  • 2
    .* is necessary as you need to match the entire string. Without that, nothing is removed. Also, note that sub can be used here instead of gsub. Jan 27 '13 at 2:20
  • 17
    if the number doesn't have to be in the start of the string, use this: gsub(".*?([0-9]+).*", "\\1", years)
    – Tomas
    Mar 14 '17 at 12:05
  • I want to get 27. I don't understand why, by adding conditions (such as adding an escaped "-", the result gets longer... gsub(".*?([0-9]+).*?", "\\1", "Jun. 27–30") Result: [1] "2730" gsub(".*?([0-9]+)\\-.*?", "\\1", "Jun. 27–30") Result: [1] "Jun. 27–30" Jun 5 '19 at 21:45
88

Update Since extract_numeric is deprecated, we can use parse_number from readr package.

library(readr)
parse_number(years)

Here is another option with extract_numeric

library(tidyr)
extract_numeric(years)
#[1] 20  1
5
  • 3
    Fine for this application but keep in mind parse_number does not play with negative numbers. Try parse_number("–27,633")
    – Nettle
    Jun 8 '18 at 19:15
  • 1
    @Nettle Yes, that is right and it won't work if there are multiple instances as well
    – akrun
    Jun 9 '18 at 3:08
  • 4
    The negative-number parsing bug has been fixed: github.com/tidyverse/readr/issues/308 readr::parse_number("-12,345") # [1] -12345
    – Russ Hyde
    Apr 23 '19 at 11:29
  • 1
    extract_numeric is deprecated now and you will receive a warning to use readr::parse_number() Jan 26 at 22:21
  • 1
    @NorthLattitude I did specified that in the Update if you noticed that
    – akrun
    Jan 26 at 22:22
69

I think that substitution is an indirect way of getting to the solution. If you want to retrieve all the numbers, I recommend gregexpr:

matches <- regmatches(years, gregexpr("[[:digit:]]+", years))
as.numeric(unlist(matches))

If you have multiple matches in a string, this will get all of them. If you're only interested in the first match, use regexpr instead of gregexpr and you can skip the unlist.

4
  • 1
    I didn't expect it, but this solution is slower than any of the others, by an order of magnitude. Jan 27 '13 at 5:15
  • @MatthewLundberg the gregexpr, regexpr or both? Jan 27 '13 at 16:16
  • 1
    gregexpr. I hadn't tried regexpr until just now. HUGE difference. Using regexpr puts it between Andrew's and Arun's solutions (second fastest) on a 1e6 set. Perhaps also interesting, using sub in Andrew's solution does not improve the speed. Jan 27 '13 at 16:42
  • This splits based on decimal points. For example 2.5 becomes c('2','5')
    – MBorg
    Aug 15 '20 at 3:07
36

Here's an alternative to Arun's first solution, with a simpler Perl-like regular expression:

as.numeric(gsub("[^\\d]+", "", years, perl=TRUE))
1
  • 1
    as.numeric(sub("\\D+","",years)). If there were letters before and |or after, then gsub
    – Onyambu
    Mar 5 '18 at 7:25
25

Or simply:

as.numeric(gsub("\\D", "", years))
# [1] 20  1
22

A stringr pipelined solution:

library(stringr)
years %>% str_match_all("[0-9]+") %>% unlist %>% as.numeric
1
  • Thanks Joe, but this answer does not extract the negative signs before the numbers in the string.
    – Miao Cai
    Aug 31 '18 at 22:29
18

You could get rid of all the letters too:

as.numeric(gsub("[[:alpha:]]", "", years))

Likely this is less generalizable though.

1
  • 3
    Oddly, Andrew's solution beats this by a factor of 5 on my machine. Jan 27 '13 at 5:16
11

We can also use str_extract from stringr

years<-c("20 years old", "1 years old")
as.integer(stringr::str_extract(years, "\\d+"))
#[1] 20  1

If there are multiple numbers in the string and we want to extract all of them, we may use str_extract_all which unlike str_extract returns all the macthes.

years<-c("20 years old and 21", "1 years old")
stringr::str_extract(years, "\\d+")
#[1] "20"  "1"

stringr::str_extract_all(years, "\\d+")

#[[1]]
#[1] "20" "21"

#[[2]]
#[1] "1"
7

Extract numbers from any string at beginning position.

x <- gregexpr("^[0-9]+", years)  # Numbers with any number of digits
x2 <- as.numeric(unlist(regmatches(years, x)))

Extract numbers from any string INDEPENDENT of position.

x <- gregexpr("[0-9]+", years)  # Numbers with any number of digits
x2 <- as.numeric(unlist(regmatches(years, x)))
4

Using the package unglue we can do :

# install.packages("unglue")
library(unglue)

years<-c("20 years old", "1 years old")
unglue_vec(years, "{x} years old", convert = TRUE)
#> [1] 20  1

Created on 2019-11-06 by the reprex package (v0.3.0)

More info: https://github.com/moodymudskipper/unglue/blob/master/README.md

2

After the post from Gabor Grothendieck post at the r-help mailing list

years<-c("20 years old", "1 years old")

library(gsubfn)
pat <- "[-+.e0-9]*\\d"
sapply(years, function(x) strapply(x, pat, as.numeric)[[1]])

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