353

I need to extract from a string a set of characters which are included between two delimiters, without returning the delimiters themselves.

A simple example should be helpful:

Target: extract the substring between square brackets, without returning the brackets themselves.

Base string: This is a test string [more or less]

If I use the following reg. ex.

\[.*?\]

The match is [more or less]. I need to get only more or less (without the brackets).

Is it possible to do it?

1

13 Answers 13

550

Easy done:

(?<=\[)(.*?)(?=\])

Technically that's using lookaheads and lookbehinds. See Lookahead and Lookbehind Zero-Width Assertions. The pattern consists of:

  • is preceded by a [ that is not captured (lookbehind);
  • a non-greedy captured group. It's non-greedy to stop at the first ]; and
  • is followed by a ] that is not captured (lookahead).

Alternatively you can just capture what's between the square brackets:

\[(.*?)\]

and return the first captured group instead of the entire match.

11
  • 184
    "Easy done", LOL! :) Regular expressions always give me headache, I tend to forget them as soon as I find the ones that solve my problems. About your solutions: the first works as expected, the second doesn't, it keeps including the brackets. I'm using C#, maybe the RegEx object has its own "flavour" of regex engine... – Diego Sep 21 '09 at 15:15
  • 6
    It's doing that because you're looking at the whole match rather than the first matched group. – cletus Sep 21 '09 at 15:35
  • 1
    Does this work if the substring also contains the delimiters? For example in This is a test string [more [or] less] would this return more [or] less ? – gnzlbg Feb 22 '13 at 18:49
  • 1
    @gnzlbg no, it would return "more [or" – MerickOWA Jul 10 '13 at 21:32
  • This is returning the string along with the begin and end string – rajibdotnet Jan 30 '14 at 22:06
61

If you are using JavaScript, the solution provided by cletus, (?<=\[)(.*?)(?=\]) won't work because JavaScript doesn't support the lookbehind operator.

Edit: actually, now (ES2018) it's possible to use the lookbehind operator. Just add / to define the regex string, like this:

var regex = /(?<=\[)(.*?)(?=\])/;

Old answer:

Solution:

var regex = /\[(.*?)\]/;
var strToMatch = "This is a test string [more or less]";
var matched = regex.exec(strToMatch);

It will return:

["[more or less]", "more or less"]

So, what you need is the second value. Use:

var matched = regex.exec(strToMatch)[1];

To return:

"more or less"
2
  • 5
    what if there are multiple matches of [more or less] in the string? – user1604294 Feb 18 '19 at 6:09
  • Lookbehind assertions have been added to RegExp in ES2018 – Chunky Chunk May 23 '19 at 17:12
22

You just need to 'capture' the bit between the brackets.

\[(.*?)\]

To capture you put it inside parentheses. You do not say which language this is using. In Perl for example, you would access this using the $1 variable.

my $string ='This is the match [more or less]';
$string =~ /\[(.*?)\]/;
print "match:$1\n";

Other languages will have different mechanisms. C#, for example, uses the Match collection class, I believe.

1
  • Thanks, but this solution didn't work, it keeps including the square brackets. As I wrote in my comment to Cletus' solution, it could be that C# RegEx object interprets it differently. I'm not expert on C# though, so it's just a conjecture, maybe it's just my lack of knowledge. :) – Diego Sep 21 '09 at 15:17
13

[^\[] Match any character that is not [.

+ Match 1 or more of the anything that is not [. Creates groups of these matches.

(?=\]) Positive lookahead ]. Matches a group ending with ] without including it in the result.

Done.

[^\[]+(?=\])

Proof.

http://regexr.com/3gobr

Similar to the solution proposed by null. But the additional \] is not required. As an additional note, it appears \ is not required to escape the [ after the ^. For readability, I would leave it in.

Does not work in the situation in which the delimiters are identical. "more or less" for example.

1
  • This is a good solution, however I have made a tweak so that it ignores an extra ']' at the end as well: [^\[\]]+(?=\]) – SteveEng Feb 18 at 19:01
8

PHP:

$string ='This is the match [more or less]';
preg_match('#\[(.*)\]#', $string, $match);
var_dump($match[1]);
6

Most updated solution

If you are using Javascript, the best solution that I came up with is using match instead of exec method. Then, iterate matches and remove the delimiters with the result of the first group using $1

const text = "This is a test string [more or less], [more] and [less]";
const regex = /\[(.*?)\]/gi;
const resultMatchGroup = text.match(regex); // [ '[more or less]', '[more]', '[less]' ]
const desiredRes = resultMatchGroup.map(match => match.replace(regex, "$1"))
console.log("desiredRes", desiredRes); // [ 'more or less', 'more', 'less' ]

As you can see, this is useful for multiple delimiters in the text as well

4

To remove also the [] use:

\[.+\]
1
4

This one specifically works for javascript's regular expression parser /[^[\]]+(?=])/g

just run this in the console

var regex = /[^[\]]+(?=])/g;
var str = "This is a test string [more or less]";
var match = regex.exec(str);
match;
4

Here's a general example with obvious delimiters (X and Y):

(?<=X)(.*?)(?=Y)

Here it's used to find the string between X and Y. Rubular example here, or see image:

enter image description here

3

I had the same problem using regex with bash scripting. I used a 2-step solution using pipes with grep -o applying

 '\[(.*?)\]'  

first, then

'\b.*\b'

Obviously not as efficient at the other answers, but an alternative.

2

I wanted to find a string between / and #, but # is sometimes optional. Here is the regex I use:

  (?<=\/)([^#]+)(?=#*)
0
0

Here is how I got without '[' and ']' in C#:

        var text = "This is a test string [more or less]";
        //Getting only string between '[' and ']'
        Regex regex = new Regex(@"\[(.+?)\]");
        var matchGroups = regex.Matches(text);
        for (int i = 0; i < matchGroups.Count; i++)
        {
            Console.WriteLine(matchGroups[i].Groups[1]);
        }

The output is:

more or less
-1

If you need extract the text without the brackets, you can use bash awk

echo " [hola mundo] " | awk -F'[][]' '{print $2}'

result:

hola mundo

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