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all.

I made a set of c++ codes as follows.
Then, I compiled each .cpp to .o by g++, successfully.
However, I got a linkage error as

 Undefined symbols for architecture x86_64:
  "derive1<3>::derive1(int)", referenced from:
      derive2::derive2(int)in derive2.o
      derive2::derive2(int)in derive2.o
ld: symbol(s) not found for architecture x86_64
collect2: ld returned 1 exit status

Could you tell me what's happening? If I bind all the code snippets in one file, I have not got any errors, and it works perfectly as I intended. I assume I should introduce extern keyword somewhere but I don't know how to do that.

My compiler is

i686-apple-darwin11-llvm-g++-4.2 (GCC) 4.2.1 (Based on Apple Inc. build 5658) (LLVM build 2336.11.00)

"base.hpp"

class base {
public:
  virtual int hoge( int num ) = 0;

};

"derive1.hpp"

#include "base.hpp"
#include <iostream>

template <int N>
class derive1 : public base {
public:
  explicit derive1( int n );
  virtual int hoge( int num ) {
    std::cout << "num = " << num << std::endl
          << "N = " << N << std::endl;
    return N;
  }    

};

"derive1.cpp"

#include "derive1.hpp"

template <int N>
derive1<N>::derive1 ( int n ) {
  std::cout << "This is the constructer of derive1" << std::endl
        << "N = " << N << ", n = " << n << std::endl;
}

"derive2.hpp"

#include "derive1.hpp"
#include <iostream>

class derive2 : public derive1<3> {
public:
  explicit derive2( int n );
};

"derive2.cpp"

#include "derive2.hpp"

derive2::derive2( int n ) : derive1<3>( n ) {
  std::cout << "This is the constructer of derive2" << std::endl
        << "n = " << n << std::endl;
}

"derive_test.cpp"

#include<iostream>
#include "derive2.hpp"

int main() {

  derive2 test(3);

  std::cout << "return value = "
        << test.hoge( 5 )
        << std::endl;
  return 0;
}
1

You shouldn't split definition and implementation for .h and .cpp files for template classes.

What is an undefined reference/unresolved external symbol error and how do I fix it?

  • Thanks! It works. And, the link is very useful for me. Now, I should use the Pimpl idiom. – uirou Jan 28 '13 at 12:05
1

Unfortunately, most compilers require that the implementation of the template function (in this case the template <int N> derive1<N>::derive1 ( int n ) is available to the compile unit using it. Move it to "derive1.hpp".

  • Thanks. I bought a lot of books of C++ but still feel lack of this kind of information. – uirou Jan 28 '13 at 12:08
1

The simple answer is that you have to put all the templated code (derive1::derive1(int) etc.) into the header files, not into their own translation units. The compiler needs to see the full definition when it tries to instantiate the template. Of course, you can have the definition for a template in the *.cpp file, but then you have to explicitly specilalize it and also declare that specialization in the header file.

  • Thanks. Now, I feel the problem is clear. – uirou Jan 28 '13 at 12:15

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