4

The case goes as following: You have a Boolean property called FullScreenEnabled. You enter some method, and the code within this method is executed iff FullScreenEnabled is true. Which of the 2 approaches below do you use in your everyday programming:

    private bool FullScreenEnabled { get; set; }
    // Check if FullScreenEnabled is false and return;
    private void Case1()
    {
        if (FullScreenEnabled == false)
        {
            return;
        }

        // code to be executed goes here!
    }

    // Surround the code by an if statement.
    private void Case2()
    {
        if (FullScreenEnabled)
        {
            // code to be executed goes here!
        }
    }
  • even better, if your question is a poll post the aswers as voting options (and mark them as community so people don't accuse you of hunting karma) – Oskar Sep 28 '08 at 10:33

10 Answers 10

11
private void MyMethod(bool arg){
   if(arg)
       return;
   //do stuff
};

(for voting)

  • prefer this one, as you get less indentation for the rest of your code, and you don't have to read the rest of the method to see if there is more logic further down in the return-immediately case – Oskar Sep 28 '08 at 10:32
3

I generally prefer the first version (bailing at the start of the method). It leads to less nesting, which slightly increases readability. Should you decide you don't need to check for the condition in the future, it's also easier to remove the if condition in the first version, especially if you have several such checks. Plus, it could be easily be written in a single line: if (!FullScreenEnabled) return;

1

It depends upon the length and complexity of the method. If the method is short then nesting inside the if is no problem (and may be clearer). If the method has lots of nested statements then the immediate return will reduce amount of necessary indentation and might improve readability slightly.

1

The first approach (using a guard clause) scales better as more if cases are added. The problem with the second approach is that adding more if statements will result in code that exhibits the arrow anti-pattern where code starts to be idented like an arrow.

There is a very good article that explains this in more detail below:

Coding Horror: Flattening Arrow Code

0

Neither approach was posted. You should read the editing help to make sure code actually appears.

0

It's about whether one should test positive or negative, i.e. return at the method beginning if the condition is not met, or executing the code only when the condition is met. In a short method, I'd go with the latter case, in a long method, I'd go with the former. I'd always go with the early exit when there are several conditions to test. It doesn't really make a difference though.

Note however that in your sample is a comparison with false. You should write !FullScreenEnabled instead. Makes the code more readable.

0
if (!FullScreenEnabled)
    throw new InvalidOperationException("Must be in fullscreen mode to do foo.");

My two cents, for what it's worth.

0

Either way works the same.

However, if you run code coverage metrics for your unit tests, the if (!FullScreenEnabled) return; will count as a separate block and you'll have to create a unit test to cover it to get to 100%.

Granted, even with the other approach you might want to have a unit test that verifies you are not executing your code when FullScreenEnabled is false. But if you cheat and don't write it, you still get 100%. :-)

0

I would go with the first approach, i find it to be more readable then the second. basically I think that:

  1. if (FullScreenEnabled == false) is more readable then if (FullScreenEnabled).
  2. if you keep putting your "sanity" checks at the start of the method the method get a nice structure that is very easy to understand.

I am however think that there is a fine line here that need not be crossed, putting return statement in too many places in the middle of a method does tend to make it more complex

-1
private void MyMethod(bool arg){
    if(!arg){
        //do stuff
    }
}

(for voting)

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.