161

I have been trying to sort out how to center an oversized image within a div using css only.

We are using a fluid layout, so the width of the image containers varies as the page width does (height of div is fixed). The image sits within a div, withvalue an inset boxshadow so as to appear as if you are looking through the page at the image.

The image itself has been sized to fill the surrounding div at its widest possible value (the design has a max-width value).

It is pretty easy to do if the image is smaller than the surrounding div:

margin-left: auto;
margin-right: auto;
display: block; 

But when the image is larger than the div it simply starts at the left edge and is off center to the right (we are using overflow: hidden).

We could assign a width=100%, but browsers do a lousy job of resizing images and the web design centers around high quality imagery.

Any ideas on centering the image so that overflow:hidden cuts off both edges evenly?

  • 1
    Did you ever solve this problem @Tom? I am running into the same issue at the moment. :) – ctrlplusb Sep 26 '13 at 12:31
  • I assume that your image widths vary. – otherDewi Oct 12 '13 at 4:32
355

Try something like this. This should center any huge element in the middle vertically and horizontally with respect to its parent no matter both of their sizes.

.parent {
    position: relative;
    overflow: hidden;
}

.child {
    position: absolute;
    top: -9999px;
    bottom: -9999px;
    left: -9999px;
    right: -9999px;
    margin: auto;

}
  • 4
    wonderful: this works with any element. even with html 5 video... thanks! – taseenb Nov 20 '13 at 14:37
  • 20
    This is incredible but I'm curious... why does this work? – Ryan May 4 '14 at 20:45
  • 14
    Why not use -100% for top/right/bottom/left? With that the container could have literally any width. – Simon Jun 17 '14 at 10:03
  • 15
    Yeah I've experienced the -100% issue as well ^^. Btw: if you add min-width and min-height of 100% you basically get a background-size: cover; behaviour with image tags -> jsfiddle – Simon Sep 9 '14 at 7:55
  • 11
    I had to set a fixed height on the parent for this to work. – Harrison Powers Oct 28 '14 at 20:08
136

This is an old Q, but a modern solution without flexbox or position absolute works like this.

margin-left: 50%;
transform: translateX(-50%);

.outer {
  border: 1px solid green;
  margin: 20px auto;
  width: 20%;
  padding: 10px 0;
  /*   overflow: hidden; */
}

.inner {
  width: 150%;
  background-color: gold;
  /* Set left edge of inner element to 50% of the parent element */
  margin-left: 50%; 
  /* Move to the left by 50% of own width */
  transform: translateX(-50%); 
}
<div class="outer">
  <div class="inner">Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipisicing elit. Quos exercitationem error nemo amet cum quia eaque alias nihil, similique laboriosam enim expedita fugit neque earum et esse ad, dolores sapiente sit cumque vero odit! Ullam corrupti iure eum similique magnam voluptatum ipsam. Maxime ad cumque ut atque suscipit enim quidem. Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipisicing elit. Excepturi impedit esse modi, porro quibusdam voluptate dolores molestias, sit dolorum veritatis laudantium rem, labore et nobis ratione. Ipsum, aliquid totam repellendus non fugiat id magni voluptate, doloribus tenetur illo mollitia. Voluptatum.</div>
</div>

So why does it work?
At first glance it seems that we shift 50% to the right and then 50% to the left again. That would result in zero shift, so what?
But the 50% are not the same, because context is important. If you calculate relative margins, the margin is calculated as percentage of the parent element, while in the transform the 50% is relative to the same element. Width that is for both.

We have this situation before we add the CSS

       +-------------------------------------------+
       | Parent element P of E                     |
       |                                           |
       +-----------------------------------------------------------+
       | Element E                                                 |
       +-----------------------------------------------------------+
       |                                           |
       +-------------------------------------------+

With the added style margin-left: 50% we have

       +-------------------------------------------+
       | Parent element P of E                     |
       |                                           |
       |                     +-----------------------------------------------------------+
       |                     | Element E                                                 |
       |                     +-----------------------------------------------------------+
       |                     |                     |
       +---------------------|---------------------+
       |========= a ========>|

       a is 50% width of P

And the transform: translateX(-50%) shifts back to the left

       +-------------------------------------------+
       | Parent element P of E                     |
       |                                           |
+-----------------------------------------------------------+
| Element E                 |                               |
+-----------------------------------------------------------+
|<============ b ===========|                      |
       |                    |                      |
       +--------------------|----------------------+
       |========= a =======>|

       a is 50% width of P
       b is 50% width of E

Unfortunately this does only work for horizontal centering as the margin percentage calculation is always relative to the width. I.e. not only margin-left and margin-right, but also margin-top and margin-bottom are calculated with respect to width.

Browser compatibility should be no problem: https://caniuse.com/#feat=transforms2d

  • It does not work for vertical alignment (when .inner has larger height that .outer) – cronfy Dec 12 '16 at 6:59
  • 1
    @cronfy No. vertically it will not work, because margin-top: 50% will be 50% of the width. not the height as desired. – yunzen Feb 9 '17 at 10:37
  • 1
    that is by far the most elegant solution – Souhaieb Besbes May 18 '17 at 8:52
  • searching for a solution for a while, best, simpliest one; Cheers – lauWM Dec 24 '17 at 7:48
  • 1
    This is pure wizard magic. Thank you! Works perfectly in Safari and Chrome (with an added -webkit-transform: translateX(-50%); for good measure) – Nick Schneble Dec 17 '18 at 19:27
22

Put a large div inside the div, center that, and the center the image inside that div.

This centers it horizontally:

HTML:

<div class="imageContainer">
  <div class="imageCenterer">
    <img src="http://placekitten.com/200/200" />
  </div>
</div>

CSS:

.imageContainer {
  width: 100px;
  height: 100px;
  overflow: hidden;
  position: relative;
}
.imageCenterer {
  width: 1000px;
  position: absolute;
  left: 50%;
  top: 0;
  margin-left: -500px;
}
.imageCenterer img {
  display: block;
  margin: 0 auto;
}

Demo: http://jsfiddle.net/Guffa/L9BnL/

To center it vertically also, you can use the same for the inner div, but you would need the height of the image to place it absolutely inside it.

  • This ended up with the left edge of the image centered within the "imageContainer". As I commented above, our image container div is fluid width and fixed height. – Tom Jan 28 '13 at 13:28
  • 1
    @Tom: If I remove the width setting on the container, it will be the width of the parent, and the image is centered even if the page is narrower than the image, i.e. as much of the left edge as the right edge will be hidden: jsfiddle.net/Guffa/L9BnL/2 – Guffa Jan 28 '13 at 13:37
  • Thanks for the inspiration. I use position: relative for .imageCenter. This way I don't need the position: relative for the parent container. – user3153298 Jun 18 '15 at 15:22
  • There's a lot of clever tricks to this question and they've all got their drawbacks. Some work "better" but are not at all easy to understand. This solution makes perfect sense, the image is being centered normally in a wider div that is being cropped. It feels wrong, but it definitely works without breaking the laws of web-physics. I chose this option over several other very difficult-to-understand tricks, even if it does feel a bit dirty. – Radley Sustaire Jan 17 '18 at 4:30
7

Late to the game, but I found this method is extremely intuitive. https://codepen.io/adamchenwei/pen/BRNxJr

CSS

.imageContainer {
  border: 1px black solid;

  width: 450px;
  height: 200px;
  overflow: hidden;
}
.imageHolder {
  border: 1px red dotted;

  height: 100%;
  display:flex;
  align-items: center;
}
.imageItself {
  height: auto;
  width: 100%;
  align-self: center;

}

HTML

<div class="imageContainer">
  <div class="imageHolder">
    <img class="imageItself" src="http://www.fiorieconfetti.com/sites/default/files/styles/product_thumbnail__300x360_/public/fiore_viola%20-%202.jpg" />
  </div>
</div>
  • 3
    Nice! It can be simplified, too. The trick is done by display: flex on the parent container and align-self: center on the image. Here's an optimized version: codepen.io/anon/pen/dWKyey – caiosm1005 May 14 '17 at 13:51
  • @caiosm1005 thanks! – Ezeewei May 15 '17 at 5:30
5

Do not use fixed or an explicit width or height to the image tag. Instead, code it:

      max-width:100%;
      max-height:100%;

ex: http://jsfiddle.net/xwrvxser/1/

  • This then leaves space around the image which I believe they are trying to avoid. – Eoin Dec 12 '17 at 17:03
4

i'm a huge fan of making an image the background of a div/node -- then you can just use the background-position: center attribute to center it regardless of screen size

  • 8
    This is not an accessible way of using images. It may work fine for decorative images, but any image which is informative needs alt text. – user2532030 Mar 23 '17 at 11:36
0

The width and height are only for example:

parentDiv{
    width: 100px;
    height: 100px;
    position:relative; 
}
innerDiv{
    width: 200px;
    height: 200px;
    position:absolute; 
    margin: auto;
    top: 0;
    left: 0;
    right: 0;
    bottom: 0;
}

It has to work for you if the left and top of your parent div are not the very top and left of the window of your screen. It works for me.

  • Didn't seem to make a difference. Not sure if it has anything to due with the fact that the width is fluid, while the height is fixed on what would be the parent div. – Tom Jan 28 '13 at 13:28
  • 2
    This technique works if the image is smaller than the container. – otherDewi Oct 12 '13 at 4:30
0

I found this to be a more elegant solution, without flex:

.wrapper {
    overflow: hidden;
}
.wrapper img {
    position: absolute;
    top: 50%;
    left: 50%;
    transform: translate(-50%, -50%);
    /* height: 100%; */ /* optional */
}

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