35

Employee table has ID and NAME columns. Names can be repeated. I want to find out if there is at least one row with name like 'kaushik%'.

So query should return true/false or 1/0.

Is it possible to find it using single query. If we try something like

select count(1) from employee where name like 'kaushik%'

in this case it does not return true/false. Also we are iterating over all the records in table. Is there way in simple SQL such that whenever first record which satisfies condition is fetched, it should stop checking further records. Or such thing can only be handled in Pl/SQL block ?

EDIT * First approach provided by Justin looks correct answer

SELECT COUNT(*) FROM employee WHERE name like 'kaushik%' AND rownum = 1
2
  • 1
    Oracle doesn't really have a Boolean data type. Commented Jan 28, 2013 at 16:51
  • you can just add rownum to your query i.e. select count(1) from employee where name like 'kaushik%' and rownum = 1; or use rownum < 2;
    – justMe
    Commented Jan 28, 2013 at 16:57

4 Answers 4

42

Commonly, you'd express this as either

SELECT COUNT(*)
  FROM employee
 WHERE name like 'kaushik%'
   AND rownum = 1

where the rownum = 1 predicate allows Oracle to stop looking as soon as it finds the first matching row or

SELECT 1
  FROM dual
 WHERE EXISTS( SELECT 1
                 FROM employee
                WHERE name like 'kaushik%' )

where the EXISTS clause allows Oracle to stop looking as soon as it finds the first matching row.

The first approach is a bit more compact but, to my eye, the second approach is a bit more clear since you really are looking to determine whether a particular row exists rather than trying to count something. But the first approach is pretty easy to understand as well.

7
  • I don't understand why you added the rownum = 1 in the first query. The query will return one row anyway, because of the aggregation COUNT(*). Commented Jan 28, 2013 at 16:57
  • @ypercube the query will stop scanning after first match as Justin explained. Commented Jan 28, 2013 at 16:58
  • Another difference is that the SELECT COUNT(*) version will return 0 for no result, whereas the SELECT 1 version will raise NO_DATA_FOUND. Commented Jan 29, 2013 at 5:27
  • 2
    @KaushikLele - Both queries will stop processing as soon as the first matching row is found. As I said in my answer, when you use the EXISTS clause, Oracle knows that it can stop evaluating the query in the EXISTS clause as soon as it returns a row. Commented Jan 31, 2013 at 14:39
  • 1
    @picheto - dual is a special table (or pseudo-table) that always exists and always has exactly one row. Commented Feb 15, 2018 at 15:41
9

How about:

select max(case when name like 'kraushik%' then 1 else 0 end)
from employee

Or, what might be more efficient since like can use indexes:

select count(x)
from (select 1 as x
      from employee
      where name like 'kraushik%'
     ) t
where rownum = 1
4

since you require that the sql query should return 1 or 0, then you can try the following query :-

select count(1) from dual 
where exists(SELECT 1 
             FROM employee
             WHERE name like 'kaushik%')

Since the above query uses Exists, then it will scan the employee table and as soon as it encounters the first record where name matches "kaushik", it will return 1 (without scanning the rest of the table). If none of the records match, then it will return 0.

3
  • As per my understanding, inner query will run first scanning over all the records of employee and returning a temporary table. And then outer query will run to check if inner query has return anything ? Am I right ? Or "Exists" clause behaves diferently. Commented Jan 31, 2013 at 7:10
  • 1
    nope...the exists clause behaves differently....the inner query will run first and as soon as the first match in the employee table is found, it will return (without scanning any further) and the outer query will then run...
    – Max
    Commented Jan 31, 2013 at 11:54
  • can you give me any link of Oracle documentation which explains Exists clause. So that I can confirm above explaination. Commented Jan 31, 2013 at 12:24
0
select 1 
 where exists ( select name 
                  from employee 
                  where name like 'kaushik%'
               )
4
  • 2
    I'm assuming you meant to have a from dual after the select 1 Commented Jan 28, 2013 at 16:56
  • well sorry i did not.. i do not even know what that means 2 b honest
    – Raghavan
    Commented Jan 28, 2013 at 16:58
  • 2
    Oracle requires a FROM clause in every SQL statement.. Unlike, say, Postgres where select 1; is a perfectly valid statement. Commented Jan 28, 2013 at 17:01
  • alrite. i just meant it in a SQL way to stop looking when u find the first record n tested the statement on SQL Server before posting. im sorry about that, have no hands on with Oracle..
    – Raghavan
    Commented Jan 28, 2013 at 17:03

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service and acknowledge you have read our privacy policy.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.