8

I would like to have a regex pattern to match smileys ":)" ,":(" .Also it should capture repeated smileys like ":) :)" , ":) :(" but filter out invalid syntax like ":( (" .

I have this with me, but it matches ":( ("

bool( re.match("(:\()",str) ) 

I maybe missing something obvious here, and I'd like some help for this seemingly simple task.

4
  • 2
    Is :( ( invalid, or a combination of valid and invalid?
    – thegrinner
    Jan 28, 2013 at 20:58
  • it is invalid. only smileys and repeated smileys are valid. Jan 28, 2013 at 21:03
  • 1
    Then you should specify the entire string using ^ and $.. as it stands it successfully matches any similey somewhere in the string
    – zebediah49
    Jan 28, 2013 at 21:05
  • thank you..i missed that point. let me try again with it. Jan 28, 2013 at 21:10

4 Answers 4

8

I think it finally "clicked" exactly what you're asking about here. Take a look at the below:

import re

smiley_pattern = '^(:\(|:\))+$' # matches only the smileys ":)" and ":("

def test_match(s):
    print 'Value: %s; Result: %s' % (
        s,
        'Matches!' if re.match(smiley_pattern, s) else 'Doesn\'t match.'
    )

should_match = [
    ':)',   # Single smile
    ':(',   # Single frown
    ':):)', # Two smiles
    ':(:(', # Two frowns
    ':):(', # Mix of a smile and a frown
]
should_not_match = [
    '',         # Empty string
    ':(foo',    # Extraneous characters appended
    'foo:(',    # Extraneous characters prepended
    ':( :(',    # Space between frowns
    ':( (',     # Extraneous characters and space appended
    ':(('       # Extraneous duplicate of final character appended
]

print('The following should all match:')
for x in should_match: test_match(x);

print('')   # Newline for output clarity

print('The following should all not match:')
for x in should_not_match: test_match(x);

The problem with your original code is that your regex is wrong: (:\(). Let's break it down.

The outside parentheses are a "grouping". They're what you'd reference if you were going to do a string replacement, and are used to apply regex operators on groups of characters at once. So, you're really saying:

  • ( begin a group
    • :\( ... do regex stuff ...
  • ')' end the group

The : isn't a regex reserved character, so it's just a colon. The \ is, and it means "the following character is literal, not a regex operator". This is called an "escape sequence". Fully parsed into English, your regex says

  • ( begin a group
    • : a colon character
    • \( a left parenthesis character
  • ) end the group

The regex I used is slightly more complex, but not bad. Let's break it down: ^(:\(|:\))+$.

^ and $ mean "the beginning of the line" and "the end of the line" respectively. Now we have ...

  • ^ beginning of line
    • (:\(|:\))+ ... do regex stuff ...
  • $ end of line

... so it only matches things that comprise the entire line, not simply occur in the middle of the string.

We know that ( and ) denote a grouping. + means "one of more of these". Now we have:

  • ^ beginning of line
  • ( start a group
    • :\(|:\) ... do regex stuff ...
  • ) end the group
  • + match one or more of this
  • $ end of line

Finally, there's the | (pipe) operator. It means "or". So, applying what we know from above about escaping characters, we're ready to complete the translation:

  • ^ beginning of line
  • ( start a group
    • : a colon character
    • \( a left parenthesis character
  • | or
    • : a colon character
    • \) a right parenthesis character
  • ) end the group
  • + match one or more of this
  • $ end of line

I hope this helps. If not, let me know and I'll be happy to edit my answer with a reply.

2
  • 1
    Thank you. Even though I had managed to solve it on my own, your incredibly well explained answer helped to clear a lot of regex concepts for me. Feb 3, 2013 at 16:41
  • Good to hear you got it taken care of, and I'm glad my explanation helped :) Feb 4, 2013 at 18:10
3

Maybe something like:

re.match('[:;][)(](?![)(])', str)
2
  • urm..could you explain what exactly does it do? Jan 28, 2013 at 21:11
  • This regex will match either a ; or a :, followed by either a ) or (, but only when it is then NOT followed by another ) or (. This is probably not the perfect solution, but is at least another way to look at the problem.
    – woemler
    Jan 28, 2013 at 21:15
2

Try (?::|;|=)(?:-)?(?:\)|\(|D|P). Haven't tested it extensively, but does seem to match the right ones and not more...

In [15]: import re

In [16]: s = "Just: to :)) =) test :(:-(( ():: :):) :(:( :P ;)!"

In [17]: re.findall(r'(?::|;|=)(?:-)?(?:\)|\(|D|P)',s)
Out[17]: [':)', '=)', ':(', ':-(', ':)', ':)', ':(', ':(', ':P', ';)']
1
  • thank you..whats the meaning of (? ..)? I read the documentation, but couldn't understand. I'd be happy if you could explain the pattern a lil bit.. Jan 28, 2013 at 21:37
0

I got the answer I was looking for from the comments and answers posted here.

re.match("^(:[)(])*$",str)

Thanks to all.

5
  • This regex will only work if str starts with : and only contains repetitions of :) and :( all the way to the end. Are you sure this is what you are looking for?
    – woemler
    Jan 28, 2013 at 22:08
  • Yes, that's exactly what I was looking for. I'm sorry for not being able to post the question correctly enough. And thanks for answering. Jan 28, 2013 at 22:20
  • Hmm... Are you sure you're sure? :) The following string would match this regex: :):):):):(:(:):(:). That doesn't seem useful from this side of the monitor. Jan 28, 2013 at 23:01
  • 1
    Also, an empty string matches. * Means "zero or more occurrences". + Means "one or more occurrences," and ? means "Zero or one occurrences." Jan 28, 2013 at 23:03
  • Yes, I agree it doesn't make sense generally. But I was using it to solve a programming contest problem. Feb 3, 2013 at 16:55

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.