6

Here is my code:

<?php

class SampleClass {

    public function __get($name){
        echo "get called";
        echo $name;
    }

    public function __set($name, $value) {
        echo "set called";
    }

}

?>

And my index file:

$object = new SampleClass();
$object->color = "black";
echo $object->color;

If I run this code as it is, here is the output:

set calledget calledcolor

However if I comment out

public function __set($name, $value) {
    echo "set called";
}

the part above (only this part), then the output will be:

black

So what happened here?

11
  • You've disabled the setter method, which is not longer outputting your message. Instead, it's displaying the natural value of your class property
    – hohner
    Jan 28, 2013 at 21:31
  • 1
    @hohner: But why isn't 'get called' being echoed?
    – gen_Eric
    Jan 28, 2013 at 21:33
  • @Koray Tugay Interesting problem. I can reproduce it
    – hek2mgl
    Jan 28, 2013 at 21:34
  • 5
    You created a public property by assigning a value to it directly. Hence magic get is no longer called.
    – datasage
    Jan 28, 2013 at 21:34
  • 1
    @datasage Yes but note that just the precense of __get() and __set() will have influence on this behaviour. This is a side effect one should know about. Will search php.net if they have documentation on this
    – hek2mgl
    Jan 28, 2013 at 21:40

2 Answers 2

4

__get will only be called is no property exists. By removing __set, you create a property when setting, so instead of calling __get, php just returns the property.

A simple way to think about it is that __get and __set are error handlers - They kick in, when php can't otherwise honor your request.

2
  • __set is also called only when no property exists right? Or is it called when a private field is trying to be accessed as well? Jan 28, 2013 at 21:52
  • 1
    @KorayTugay When no public property exists. It will get called for private, protected and non-existant properties.
    – datasage
    Jan 28, 2013 at 21:53
3

This is an explanation of what is happening. In your first example. You never stored the value within the object, nor did a declared property exist. This, echo $object->color; never actually does anything as nothing is returned from __get.

In your second example, you assigned a value to a property in your object. Since you did not declare the property in your object, it gets created by default as public. Since its public, __get is never called when accessing it.

14
  • 1
    @hek2mgl Uh, the presence of __get and __set is what influences this behavior by definition. This is not a side-effect: when your __set magic method doesn't assign anything explicitly, nothing gets assigned at all; this is the whole purpose of the magic setter method, to control what is getting assigned and how.
    – lanzz
    Jan 28, 2013 at 21:46
  • 1
    @hek2mgl The only thing the set function did was this: echo "set called"; If you want it to create a property in the class it will also need to do this this->{$name} = $value. If that happened in the code __get would have never been called when accessing it.
    – datasage
    Jan 28, 2013 at 21:52
  • 3
    @hek2mgl No. Expected is that __set is called on any assignment to an inaccessible member, because that is what the documentation says. A non-existent member is certainly inaccessible. You are free to implement the dynamic creation of such properties yourself inside your __set method, but if it did happen automatically before the __set method is called, you would have had no way to disable it.
    – lanzz
    Jan 28, 2013 at 21:54
  • 1
    @KorayTugay Not exactly, in your example, you never declared the property, or assigned a value to a property in your __set function
    – datasage
    Jan 28, 2013 at 22:11
  • 1
    It went into __set because a public property did not exist. In your case, you never did anything with $value, so the state of the object never changed.
    – datasage
    Jan 28, 2013 at 22:15

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