I have two text files, file1.txt and file2.txt.

file1.txt contains a list of numbers. file2.txt also contains a list of numbers, but more of them (a good chunk are numbers from file1.txt). This is what I am trying to do:

I want to remove all the numbers in file1.txt from file2.txt and have the output saved to file3.txt. So in file3.txt, it will contain no numbers from file1.txt. How can I accomplish this?

Here's one way using awk:

awk 'FNR==NR { a[$0]; next } !($0 in a)' file1.txt file2.txt > file3.txt

This reads file1 into an array, then when iterating through file2, it will print lines of file2 that are not in the array and write them to an output file. If you have any questions, don't hesitate to ask. Cheers.

  • Time: 1.010 seconds for file1.txt with 10k and file2.txt with 1M numbers. – erik Jan 30 '13 at 15:24

With GNU grep, you can use the 'fgrep' mode:

grep -F -v -f file1.txt -w file2.txt > file3.txt

Demo:

seq 1 30 > file2.txt
for i in 1 2 3 4 5; do echo $RANDOM; done | sed 's/\(..\).*/\1/' > file1.txt
grep -F -v -f file1.txt -w file2.txt > file3.txt

The contents of file2.txt is lines with numbers 1 through 30. The content of file1.txt is 5 semi-random 2-digit numbers. The output in file3.txt is the lines in file 2 that are not in file 1. Note that the random number generated by the loop are not very good, nor constrained to 1..30 (see also comments just below).

The feature that is specific to GNU grep is the -w flag, which matches whole words. Interestingly, POSIX 2008 specifies that -x should match exact lines, and the -x option works correctly for me (on Mac OS X 10.7.5, but /usr/bin/grep is GNU grep 2.5.1). In theory, the -x is more portable. Since it was in the POSIX 1997 standard too, it should be widely available. The -w option would be more appropriate if there were multiple numbers on a single line (but grep would eliminate whole lines).

  • +1. According to the OP's question file1.txt and file2.txt should be swapped. Btw. you could get more controlled randomizing with shuf: seq 1 30 | shuf | head -n5. – Thor Jan 29 '13 at 7:26
  • I'd not come across shuf (though I find it on my machine in my /usr/gnu/bin directory). I have my own random to generate numbers (random -n 5 1 30), but I have to explain that. Yes, it looks like I do have the roles of file1.txt and file2.txt reversed compared to the question; there's slightly odd phraseology in the question and I misread it, so I'll fix it. Thanks! – Jonathan Leffler Jan 29 '13 at 7:36
  • I agree the question should be improved. shuf was added to GNU coreutils in August 2006, as such it's not as portable as using $RANDOM. – Thor Jan 29 '13 at 8:00
  • You could also use $(($RANDOM % 30 +1)) to keep the numbers within the limits of 1 and 30. – erik Jan 30 '13 at 14:43
  • Time: 1.177 seconds for file1.txt with 10k and file2.txt with 1M numbers. – erik Jan 30 '13 at 15:19
sort file1.txt file2.txt|uniq -u > file3.txt
  • Thanks, I tried this, and got "sort: string comparison failed: Illegal byte sequence" – user2020202 Jan 29 '13 at 3:17
  • Maybe try exporting LC_ALL=C? So: LC_ALL=C sort file1.txt file2.txt|uniq -u > file3.txt – Stephen Niedzielski Jan 29 '13 at 3:28
  • If file1.txt is a subset of file2.txt, and file2.txt doesn't contain duplicates not found in file1.txt, this operation yields the difference. – Stephen Niedzielski Jan 29 '13 at 3:59
  • For example, "echo -e 'foo\nbaz' > file1.txt; echo -e 'foo\nbar\nbaz' > file2.txt; sort file1.txt file2.txt|uniq -u > file3.txt" yields "bar". – Stephen Niedzielski Jan 29 '13 at 4:02
  • 1
    I missed the significance of the -u option to uniq. We live, we learn. – Jonathan Leffler Jan 29 '13 at 5:55

You can use the unix "diff" command for get the difference and filter out unwanted lines. You can use --changed-group-format and --unchanged-group-format options to filter required data.

Following three options can use to select the relevant group for each option:

  • '%<' get lines from FILE1

  • '%>' get lines from FILE2

  • '' (empty string) for removing lines from both files.

e.g:

diff --changed-group-format="%>" --unchanged-group-format="" file1.txt file2.txt > file3.txt
  • There seems to be an error. I get a different file3.txt then with all other answers to this question, after sorting and removing non tabs which were inserted with comm (see Thor). And your answer is the slowest: 7.381 seconds for file1.txt with 10k and file2.txt with 1M numbers. – erik Jan 30 '13 at 15:18
  • @erik good to know about the performance. thanks. What is the error you are talking about? did you try to compare two small files and check whether this gives the expected results? – Manjula Jan 30 '13 at 16:26

Can you give a little more information about how these numbers are formatted? Are each of them on a new line? Are they all the same number of digits?

EDIT: After receiving comment:

while read line
do
    bool="false"
    while read secLine
    do
        if [ "$line" == "$secLine" ]
        then
            bool="true"
        fi
    done <file1
    if [ "$bool" == "false" ]
    then
         echo $line >> file3.txt
    fi
done <file2

That will work, albeit by brute force (or it should work. Check for syntax errors. I didn't see any but there may be some.) It may take awhile depending on how many numbers you have.

  • They are a new line, and they aren't the same number of digits – user2020202 Jan 29 '13 at 2:45
  • I would suggest using a script to do this for you. Say, a script that checked each line file2 and compared it to each line in file1. If there was never a match,then put that specific line in file3. – Roguebantha Jan 29 '13 at 2:48
  • There, there's a script that will work for you, I'm sure (as long as I didn't make any syntax errors) Be warned, it may take awhile depending on the file sizes. – Roguebantha Jan 29 '13 at 2:58
  • Thank you for your response, I think the file may be too large as I am receiving "line 6: [: too many arguments" – user2020202 Jan 29 '13 at 3:19
  • Ah, no actually, that's one of those elusive syntax errors I was afraid of >< put quotes around $line and $secLine and that should fix the problem. – Roguebantha Jan 29 '13 at 3:47

You want to only print unique elements of file2.txt. This is what the comm utility is designed for:

comm -13 <(sort file1.txt) <(sort file2.txt)

Testing

$ cat file1.txt
5
4
6
2
10

$ cat file2.txt
3
7
8
2
4
1
9
10
5
6

$ comm -13 <(sort file1.txt) <(sort file2.txt)
1
3
7
8
9
  • Time: 2.170 seconds for file1.txt with 10k and file2.txt with 1M numbers. It is slower than awk although comm is designed for this kind of exercise? – erik Jan 30 '13 at 15:21
  • Should the command be comm -13 ... so that if there are numbers in file1.txt that do not appear in file2.txt, they will not appear in the output? What you've got is fine if every number in file1.txt1 does appear somewhere in file2.txt. – Jonathan Leffler Jan 30 '13 at 15:27
  • @erik: was this with pre-sorted input? – Thor Jan 30 '13 at 15:56
  • @JonathanLeffler: you're right -13 is more correct, I'll fix it. – Thor Jan 30 '13 at 15:59

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