3

For example I have a class with 2 counters (in multi-threaded environment):

public class MyClass {
  private int counter1;
  private int counter2;

  public synchronized void increment1() {
        counter1++;
  }

  public synchronized void increment2() {
        counter2++;
  }

}

Theres 2 increment operations not related with each other. But I use same object for lock (this).

It is true that if clients simultaneously calls increment1() and increment2() methods, then increment2 invocation will be blocked until increment1() releases the this monitor?

If it's true, does it mean that I need to provide different monitor locks for each operation (for performance reasons)?

  • 3
    @dinesh707 - That is completely incorrect. The OP has it right. – Brian Roach Jan 29 '13 at 7:20
  • @dinesh707 only if the JVM determines they don't interact. If they do interact, they must be synchronized. – John Dvorak Jan 29 '13 at 7:20
  • i took it off since its adding wrong value – dinesh707 Jan 29 '13 at 7:23
12

It is true that if clients simultaneously calls increment1() and increment2() methods, then increment2 invocation will be blocked until increment1() releases the this monitor?

If they're called on the same instance, then yes.

If it's true, does it mean that I need to provide different monitor locks for each operation (for performance reasons)?

Only you can know that. We don't know your performance requirements. Is this actually a problem in your real code? Are your real operations long-lasting? Do they occur very frequently? Have you performed any diagnostics to estimate the impact of this? Have you profiled your application to find out how much time is being spent waiting for the monitor at all, let alone when it's unnecessary?

I would actually suggest not synchronizing on this for entirely different reasons. It's already hard enough to reason about threading when you do control everything - but when you don't know everything which can acquire a monitor, you're on a hiding to nothing. When you synchronize on this, it means that any other code which has a reference to your object can also synchronize on the same monitor. For example, a client could use:

synchronized (myClass) {
    // Do something entirely different
}

This can lead to deadlocks, performance issues, all kinds of things.

If you use a private final field in your class instead, with an object created just to be a monitor, then you know that the only code acquiring that monitor will be your code.

| improve this answer | |
5

1) yes it's true that increment1() blocks increment2() and vice versa because they both are implicitly synchronizing on this

2) if you need a better performance consider the lock-free java.util.concurrent.atomic.AtomicInteger class

  private AtomicInteger counter1 = new AtomicInteger();
  private AtomicInteger counter2 = new AtomicInteger();

  public void increment1() {
        counter1.getAndIncrement();
  }

  public void increment2() {
        counter2.getAndIncrement();
  }
| improve this answer | |
2

If you synchonize on the method, as what you did here, you lock the whole object, so two thread accessing a different variable from this same object would block each other anyway.

If you want to syncrhonize only a counter at a time so two thread won't block each other while accessing different variables, you have to add the two counters here in two synchronized block, and use different variables as the "lock" of the two blocks.

| improve this answer | |
  • you lock the whole object - it's mean that if I call long synchronized method ob object, then I can't use this object until synchronized method stop run? – MyTitle Jan 29 '13 at 7:21
  • You can use this object, but you cannot perform monitor_enter on this object as a lock! So another invocation on increment2(also need to lock "this" object), will have to wait. – StarPinkER Jan 29 '13 at 7:22
2

You are right it will be a performance bottleneck if you use same Object. You can use different lock for individual counter or use java.util.concurrent.atomic.AtomicInteger for concurrent counter.

Like:

public class Counter {
  private AtomicInteger count = new AtomicInteger(0);
  public void incrementCount() {
    count.incrementAndGet();
  }
  public int getCount() {
    return count.get();
  }
}
| improve this answer | |
1

Yes the given code is identical to the following:

  public void increment1() {
        synchronized(this) {
             counter1++;
        }
  }

  public oid increment2() {
        synchronized(this) {
             counter2++;
        }
  }

which means that only one method can be executed at the same time. You should either provide different locks (and locking on this is a bad idea to begin with), or some other solution. The second one is the one you actually want here: AtomicInteger

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1

Yes if multiple threads try to call methods on your object they will wait trying to get the lock (although the order of who gets the lock isn't guaranteed.) As with everything there is no reason to optimise until you know this is the bottle neck in you code.

| improve this answer | |
0

If you need the performance benefits that can be had from being able to call both operations in parallel, then yes, you do not to provide different monitor objects for the different operations.

However, there is something to be said for premature optimization and that you should make sure that you need it before making your program more complex to accommodate it.

| improve this answer | |

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