4

I had the following base class with several dependencies:

public abstract class ViewModel
{
    private readonly ILoggingService loggingService;

    public ViewModel(
        ILoggingService loggingService,
        ...)
    {
        this.loggingService = loggingService;
        ...
    }
}

In my derived class, I don't want to have to repeat all of the parameters in this base class constructor, so I did this:

public abstract class ViewModel
{
    private readonly IUnityContainer container;
    private ILoggingService loggingService;
    ...

    public ViewModel(IUnityContainer container)
    {
        this.container = container;
    }

    public ILoggingService LoggingService
    {
        get
        {
            if (this.loggingService == null)
            {
                this.loggingService = this.container.Resolve<IUnityContainer>();
            }

            return this.loggingService;
        }
    }

    ...
}

Now my derived classes only need to pass one thing to my base class constructor. I also have the nice effect of having my dependencies resolved only when they are needed.

However, I have since learned it is a bad idea to pass an IOC container around. What's the best alternative design pattern, bearing in mind that many of the services passed in have been registered with my IOC container as a singleton?

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  • 1
    "In my derived class, I don't want to have to repeat all of the parameters in this base class constructor" - either use property injection, or autogenerate the constructor and be done with it. (It's not like you can really meaningfully decouple child classes from their parents anyway.) – millimoose Jan 29 '13 at 11:28
10

As you state, you should avoid passing the container around. This turns it into a "bag of holding", where you can no longer see what your dependencies are, and you can't easily see what's in the bag.

Instead, if you find that your constructor takes far too many parameters, this is a smell by itself. In this case, you'll often find that your class is trying to do too many things (it's violating the single responsibility principle).

Take a look at your parameter list, and see if you can group the parameters into smaller groups. For example, if your constructor takes IEmailSender, IEventLog and ILoggingService, maybe what you really need is an INotificationService which aggregates these three dependencies.

Of course, sometimes you do have a constructor with that many dependencies. In this case, the class is probably just used to gather these things together and to wire them up. If this is the case, the class should probably avoid doing any actual work.

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6

Passing all dependencies in the Constructor is the cleanest way.

I do not see the problem in passing parameters in derived classes. Avoid typing is the wrong motivation and there are tools like Resharper helping you to generate these constructors.

If you have a lot of dependencies it indicates, that the class violate Single Responsibility Pattern.

In many cases its also a good think to favor Composition over Inheritance. This also helps to split classes into smaller pieces which do not violate SRP.

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  • Not agree with you! Think you have to pass more than 5,6 parameters(4 is too many in my opinion) - your code turns to be not readable. And you know, probably you would like to add more parameters in the future... I think the better practice is to group those parameter into separate classes. – Geka P Jan 22 '17 at 15:37
1

Just create the derived classes via the container and inject them where you need them.

Wrong example - Foo worries about the dependencies of Bar as it needs to instanciate Bar.

class Foo {
    SomeDependency x;
    public Bar(SomeDependency x) {
        this.x = x;
    }
    public doSomething() {
        Bar bar = new Bar(x);
        bar.doSomething();
    }

}

class Bar {
    SomeDependency x;
    public Bar(SomeDependency x) {
        this.x = x;
    }
    public void doSomething() {
        // ...
    }
}

Correct example - Foo does not care how Bar is created. Bar gets the dependencies directly from the container.

class Foo {
    SomeDependency x;
    Bar bar;

    public Bar(SomeDependency x, Bar bar) {
        this.x = x;
        this.bar = bar;
    }
    public doSomething() {
        bar.doSomething();
    }

}

class Bar {
    SomeDependency x;
    public Bar(SomeDependency x) {
        this.x = x;
    }
    public void doSomething() {
        // ...
    }
}
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  • 1
    I added a small example which illustrates what I mean. I highly recommend watching The Clean Code Talks - Don't Look For Things! which explains this concept very well. – bikeshedder Jan 29 '13 at 11:01
  • 1
    But in this example Bar is not derived from Foo... so it is not relevant to the question? – Felix Jan 29 '13 at 11:01
  • 1
    @Felix Adding inheritance does not change the answer and only makes it more difficult to understand my answer. I have the impression that the questioner did not follow the very basic idea of IoC and DI: Create and wire your objects using the container. – bikeshedder Jan 29 '13 at 11:05
  • 1
    My understanding of the question was that you have Foo(Dep1 dep) and then a derived class would have Bar(Dep1 dep, Dep2 dep2) : base(dep). If you had a lot of derived classes you could imagine writing out Dep1 dep all the time as being unnecessary. Of course with dep-inj you probably shouldn't have that many derived classes anyways – Felix Jan 29 '13 at 11:18
  • What if bar.doSomething(); needs a further dependency AnotherDependency? Therefore bar.doSomething(AnotherDependency methodDependency);. How do you handle this case? – tonix Mar 29 '18 at 22:12
1

AOP could be a solution if you want consistent behavior across a series of classes. Here's an example on logging with PostSharp : http://www.sharpcrafters.com/solutions/logging

For ad-hoc logging this might not perfectly suit your needs though.

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1

When you have many levels of inheritance, this can be a hassle, but it's a good thing to explicitly tell what dependencies a class have (through the constructor). An alternative is Annotating Objects for Property (Setter) Injection, but I recommend that you use this only for optional dependencies, i.e. a logger.

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1

Avoid passing the container around. This is service location. You must invert control so that whatever creates your ViewModel gives you the dependent logging service.

Mark Seeman does this very nicely in his book with decoration. AOP is a tidy alternative, as someone has already highlighted.

Your code should become:

public ViewModel(ILoggingService logger)
{
    loggingService= logger;
}

public ILoggingService LoggingService
{
    get
    {
        return this.loggingService;
    }
}
| |
1

CommonServiceLocator can give you a way to resolve a resource via a static call.

Unity docs Using Injection Attributes shows other ways to choose from if constructor injection isn't jiving.

I love using Property setter injection for logging when I've got a common base class:

abstract class Widget
{
   [Dependency]
   public ILogger { set; set; } // Set it and forget it!
}

I can't say I've ever actually used Method Call Injection.

You shouldn't feel like you're doing something wrong just because you can't design everything to have all dependencies coming in via constructor all the time... in a perfect world maybe, but in practice it's nice to have options...

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0

I ended up creating the interface and class below using the factory pattern to reduce the number of parameters added to the constructor:

public interface IInfrastructureFactory
{
    ILoggingService LoggingService { get; }
    // ... Other Common Services Omitted ...
}

public class InfrastructureFactory : IInfrastructureFactory
{
    private readonly ILoggingService loggingService;
    // ... Other Common Services Omitted ...

    public InfrastructureFactory(
        ILoggingService loggingService,
        // ... Other Common Services Omitted ...
        )
    {
        this.loggingService = loggingService;
        // ... Other Common Services Omitted ...
    }

    public ILoggingService LoggingService
    {
        get { return this.loggingService; }
    }

    // ... Other Common Services Omitted ...
}

In my IOC container, I register the IInfrastructureFactory once. In my View Model, I only have a single dependency and creating a new view model is much quicker and simpler.

public abstract class ViewModel
{
    private readonly IInfrastructureFactory infrastructureFactory;

    public ViewModel(IInfrastructureFactory infrastructureFactory)
    {
        this.infrastructureFactory = infrastructureFactory;
    }

    public ILoggingService LoggingService
    {
        get { return this.infrastructureFactory.LoggingService; }
    }

    // ... Other Common Services Omitted ...
}
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-2

You should stick with your first pattern. If you are getting tired of adding those constructor variables then you have too many. Think about breaking up your class into smaller bits. This pattern is so powerful because it is self-regulating through laziness :)

If you have a global type dependency that you might want to use everywhere (Logging is a perfect example)... just use the singleton pattern... (Note I also assume the container has also been created using the singleton pattern).

public static LoggingService
{
    private static ILoggingService _current;

    public static ILoggingService Current
    {
        get 
        {
            if(_current == null) { _current = Container.Current.Resolve<ILoggingService>(); }
            return _current;  
        }
    }
}

Then use it like...

LoggingService.Current.Log(...);

That way you don't have to inject it into everything.

You should generally avoid this pattern unless it is used in a lot of modules...

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  • 2
    -1 Singletons are considered an anti pattern. Using a static member is even worse than passing the IoC container around. – bikeshedder Jan 29 '13 at 11:10

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