9

I find that a lot of my time while writing css is wasted on locating the right place to put new rules. For example, if I have this stylesheet:

.a, .b, #c {
  display:inline-block;
}

.d {
  color: #fff;
}

And I want to add .d {display:inline-block;), I'll often think for a sec about whether I should add this to the 1st or 2nd section. Meaning:

.a, .b, #c, .d {
  display:inline-block;
}

vs

.d {
  color: #fff;
  display:inline-block;
}

Obviously as CSS gets more complicated, there is more time wasted on this. Another time consumer is the process of locating existing rules in order to edit them, when the selector appears several time in the stylesheet.

Is there a specific workflow / tool that can make the CSS writing process faster and more efficient?


Please Note:

  1. A similar question already exists, but it was answered two years ago, so an up-to-date answer is required

  2. As a relatively new SO user I wasn't sure whether this belongs here or on Programmers. If this is off-topic on SO I'll be happy to migrate it.

  • 9
    Quick answer ( while the other guys are writing an essay for you ;) ) Use a pre-processor (SASS or LESS), and take a look at object oriented CSS – wakooka Jan 29 '13 at 13:04
  • @jerome.s Interesting. Which of these do you recommend more (SASS/LESS)? – Roy Jan 29 '13 at 13:08
  • 2
    SASS definitely, just because SASS can do things that LESS can't. A good comparison here : css-tricks.com/sass-vs-less – wakooka Jan 29 '13 at 13:15
  • 1
    Of course SASS, because LESS does.. you know.. less. – monshq Jan 29 '13 at 13:23
  • 2
    I would also suggest something like SASS or OOCSS, Have a read some of the stuff on here, csswizardry.com , all excellent articles about how to efficiently code do CSS – kolin Jan 29 '13 at 13:57
3
+50

I ran into this problem a few years back and like you, I noticed that whenever I was working with large CSS files (say... 1000+ lines), that most of the time was spent looking up specific selectors, more so than editing or writing specific rules.

Because of that, I have a few conventions I follow that probably made working with CSS files 10x easier for me. The key is to realize that the bottleneck in your workflow is looking up selectors, so the key is to make this process easier.

  1. Write your CSS selectors in the order as they appear in your HTML mark up. More often than not, we start writing styles by looking at our mark up first (via inspect element, etc.) so when you write your selectors in the order of your markup, you have a rough idea for where to look for the rules in your CSS file.

    Thus, for your example code, the answer depends if you are sacrificing the organization for code reuse. Sure, you might be able to reuse code if you keep things in the same selector (i.e. .a, .b, .c, .d), but are you making the selector impossible for you to find when you revisit your CSS 6 months later? Use your judgement.

  2. Write styles on a single line. Unless there's some good reason you can't write this way (e.g. you're using a CSS preprocessor where you have to nest your rules, you work with an existing codebase maintained by 10 other developers, etc.), writing styles on a single line helps you find styles MUCH faster. For example, writing like:

    selector { property1: value, property2: value; property3: value; }
    selector2 { property1: value, property2: value; property3: value; }
    selector3 { property1: value, property2: value; property3: value; }
    

    Instead of:

    selector { 
      property1: value, 
      property2: value; 
      property3: value; 
    }
    
    selector2 { 
      property1: value,
      property2: value;
      property3: value;
    }
    
    selector3 { 
      property1: value,
      property2: value;
      property3: value;
    }
    

    Writing rules on a single line allows you to SCAN selectors. Plus, you can easily reduce a CSS file with 1000+ lines to 10 times fewer that amount, which makes it much more manageable. Again, remember that te bottleneck in our workflow is looking up selectors. So while writing the "traditional" way makes reading properties easier, it actually slows down the process for looking up selectors. What's more, if you write selectors in a single line, you can then use indentations like this:

    header { property1: value, property2: value; property3: value; }
      header h1 { property1: value, property2: value; property3: value; }
      header h3 { property1: value, property2: value; property3: value; }
      header h3 span { property1: value, property2: value; property3: value; }
    body { property1: value, property2: value; property3: value; }
    
  3. Find and replace is your bread and butter. If you organize your selectors using the two suggestions above, often finding selectors for major sections can lead you close enough to find the specific rules that you need. For example, if you're trying to find something ultra specific like #someDiv header ui li a:hover and you can just do a search for #someDiv and that would lead you close enough to find the rest.

Hope that helps :)

  • 1
    I completely agree - I find writing the CSS rules in the order appear in the view much simpler to read and understand. – Jimbo Feb 13 '13 at 10:02
7

You should group styles based on their purpose and logic, rather than by common style attributes. If .a and .b have nothing in common it's okay to put display: inline-block; on each of them.

Focus on maintainable code rather than super-efficient CSS files (there are minifying and compression libraries that can do that for you).

  • 1
    I was going to add that selectors are evaluated from right to left. But optimizing css is like trimming your garden with a pair of scissors. Maintainable code is the way to go. – shash7 Jan 29 '13 at 13:54
  • +1, I'd like to add: "It's not even okay to put display: inline-block; on each of them, but it's strongly suggested." Why? Consider you want to change a style of the class .a. Instead of just go to .a {...} and change the style with one keystroke, you need now search through the hole CSS file for ".a" and look where your property is. Not even to talk about if you set the same property two times without knowing it. Conclusion: Structures like like .class1, .class2, .class.., classn {...} are harmful. – Marcus Feb 9 '13 at 13:16
2

First of all, don't think too much about optimization in your CSS. There are tools for that as said in other people comments.

You must style your elements and not "element your styles". This strange sentence means that CSS should not be defined like:

.class1, .class2, .class.., classn {
  display:inline-block;
}

.class1, .class2, .class3{
  backgroundColor: #333
}

.class1, .class.., classn {
  opacity: 0.1
}
...

because you'll become crazy looking at all the rules that are applied to the particular element you are styling right now. Be kind to your brain :)

Also, I think that right now it's common practice to be styling directly in the browser with the chrome inspector and similar tools. You'd see better a few rules with a lot of properties defined inside them than, 20 rules that applies to your element and a lot a other elements that have nothing to do with the element your are styling.

If you do want to code css faster, again as other people said, you should use a css pre-processor: Less or sass. While sass is the clear winner, I got used to less because I learnt twitter bootstrap which is built with less. And that's ok, the improvement of starting to use a css preprocessor is much bigger than choosing between less or sass anyway.

  • +1: Exactly my words. Mixing up classes is harmful. – Marcus Feb 9 '13 at 13:08
1

your question seems to be an "general" confusion of designers. Best way to design a css is that you should be clear enough about which class will be applied to what? If you want to apply different properties to various elements, (say you want to set width=40px for div, and 50px for span), then you should make new css class, but if you have all properties same, just continue with existing one !

Best way to add po[roperty is that, if you have to add new property to single element, use inline css. It will be helpful to you to maintain format of your stylesheet. Example:

<div class="divcss" style="height:35px">
1

When it comes to writing better, more maintainable CSS code, you can only do so much in plain CSS. And, as I'm sure you've heard before, you can write your code in Sass or Less, which are dynamic CSS languages.

That may be all well and good, but how does that relate to your question? Read on! For example, in Less, you can use nested CSS. For example, look at the following:

article.post {

    p{
        margin: 0 0 12px 0;
    }
    a {
        color: red;
    }
    a:hover {
        color: blue;
    }
    img {
        float:left;
    }

}

"You can nest rules as much as you like which saves you a lot of worrying later on. Have you ever wanted to change the padding of something but were scared because you didn’t know exactly what elements it might affect? By using nesting you can take a lot of the guesswork out of your CSS."

Now, the beauty of Less is that you already know how to write it. All CSS code is valid Less code. Except, you can do more. Let's look at mixins, for example:

.rounded_top {
    -webkit-border-top-left-radius: 6px;
    -webkit-border-top-right-radius: 6px;
    -moz-border-radius-topleft: 6px;
    -moz-border-radius-topright: 6px;
    border-top-left-radius: 6px;
    border-top-right-radius: 6px;
}



.tab {
    background: #333;
    color:#fff;
    .rounded_top;  //Now you have a rounded top with simple, maintainable code
}



.submit {
    .tab;
    background: red;  //Notice that background: #333; is overridden here
}

There is a tremendously wonderful article on all the features of Less here, and this is just a small subset of what you can do with Less but the point that I wanted to make is that you don't have to be scared to jump into dynamic CSS languages.

You already know how to use them.

1

You need to learn a thing or two about CSS pre-processors. You have a some of options like SASS and LESS. There are a number of resources around the web from where you can learn about these pre-processors and how you can use them.

What you have asked is more about the usage of the new CSS class that you are defining. It's something like a table, a chair and a tree are made of wood, but a chair can also have a color which will be different than their common properties. This is where OOCSS comes in.

The above example might not be great, but I hope you get what I am trying to say. If you wish to add a new property to the already existing styles, then it's up to you how you wish to do it. But if you want to give meaning to your styles, then you need to bring in order.


Bonus

You should definitely go through the entire wiki of Object Oriented CSS by Stubbornella. You might find the commits on that repository very old but they have been the foundation of a number of OOCSS based frameworks.

Personally I am a big fan of inuit.css. It's the most powerful CSS framework I have come across and it's absolutely mind-blowing. It gives you full control over your design and keeps things DRY.

0

You can make a set rules with a particular class name as a default or common styles, so that you can target a particular id, class, or tag.

.pos-inline{
  display:inline-block;
}
.col-white {
  color: #fff;
}

just add the class or div separated by comma(.a, .b, #c) whichever property you want to apply.

  • Hmmm...if you do this with just one style, you could also just use the style-property in HTML (aka "inline CSS") and won't need any CSS. Because it doesn't matter if you need to define several CSS classes in a tag or several style-property in a tag. But also if you use several properties per class, there's no advantage of this solution at all, but many disadvantages, especially if you don't know the exact values of the properties and need to look it up everytime in the CSS before defining a CSS class in HTML. And even more you don't see anymore in the CSS file which tag has which properties! – Marcus Feb 9 '13 at 13:29
  • This is a total and complete abuse of CSS. Your class names are meant to be semantic, the whole idea is that the CSS can change independently of the names of your classes. What happens when you decide you want a certain element styled with col-white to be red instead? You're either going to have to change color-white to be #f00, which is totally nonsense, or change the DOM instead of changing the style sheet, which defeats the purpose of CSS. Don't do this, use semantic names for your classes. – meagar Sep 23 '13 at 13:19
0

If you optimize your CSS file, you can write like this:

.dis-inblck{display:inline-block;}
.color-w{color:#fff;}
  • That's bad advice, and not how CSS is supposed to work. Your CSS class names should be semantic, not stylistic. You should never have classes like "color-red". If you're making a one-to-one mapping of classes to styles, you're totally misusing CSS. – meagar Sep 23 '13 at 13:17

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