5

Can you clarify me why in this piece of code:

private Dictionary<Type, Type> viewTypeMap = new Dictionary<Type, Type>();

public void ShowView<TView>(ViewModelBase viewModel, bool showDialog = false)
    where TView : IView
{
    var view = Activator.CreateInstance(viewTypeMap[typeof(TView)]);
    (IView)view.ShowDialog();
}

I get the error:

"Only assignment, call, increment, decrement, and new object expressions can be used as a statement."

IView defines the ShowDialog() method.

12

The cast operator is of lower precedence than the member access operator.

(A)B.C();

is parsed as

(A)(B.C());

which is not a legal statement. You ought to write

((A)B).C();

if you mean to cast B to A and then call C() on type A.

For your future reference, the precedence table is here:

http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/aa691323(v=VS.71).aspx

|improve this answer|||||
2

Why not try the following so that your view object is declared as IView instead of object?

public void ShowView<TView>(ViewModelBase viewModel, bool showDialog = false) where TView : IView
{
    var view = (IView)Activator.CreateInstance(viewTypeMap[typeof(TView)]);
    view.ShowDialog();
}
|improve this answer|||||
0

You can cast it as it is being instantiated, then if it is used multiple times you won't need to recast it every time.

var view = (IView)Activator.CreateInstance(viewTypeMap[typeof(TView)]);
view.ShowDialog();
|improve this answer|||||
-1

Change

(IView)view.ShowDialog();

to

((IView) view).ShowDialog();

Eric explained why

|improve this answer|||||

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.