70

I have a very long string of text with () and [] in it. I'm trying to remove the characters between the parentheses and brackets but I cannot figure out how.

The list is similar to this:

x = "This is a sentence. (once a day) [twice a day]"

This list isn't what I'm working with but is very similar and a lot shorter.

2
  • 10
    Please show what you've tried (by editing your question NOT by adding a comment), and people will point you in the right direction. Jan 30, 2013 at 4:50
  • 4
    may () or [] be nested e.g., "[a [(b] ([c))]]"?
    – jfs
    Jan 30, 2013 at 4:55

6 Answers 6

137

You can use re.sub function.

>>> import re 
>>> x = "This is a sentence. (once a day) [twice a day]"
>>> re.sub("([\(\[]).*?([\)\]])", "\g<1>\g<2>", x)
'This is a sentence. () []'

If you want to remove the [] and the () you can use this code:

>>> import re 
>>> x = "This is a sentence. (once a day) [twice a day]"
>>> re.sub("[\(\[].*?[\)\]]", "", x)
'This is a sentence.  '

Important: This code will not work with nested symbols

Explanation

The first regex groups ( or [ into group 1 (by surrounding it with parentheses) and ) or ] into group 2, matching these groups and all characters that come in between them. After matching, the matched portion is substituted with groups 1 and 2, leaving the final string with nothing inside the brackets. The second regex is self explanatory from this -> match everything and substitute with the empty string.

-- modified from comment by Ajay Thomas

5
  • 1
    it doesn't work if x = "ewq[a [(b] ([c))]]", it gives 'ewq )]]' not 'eqw'...
    – pradyunsg
    Jan 30, 2013 at 9:30
  • @paddila I know but Tic does not say anything about nested symbols.
    – jvallver
    Jan 30, 2013 at 9:34
  • I commented asking him about it.. he hasn't responded yet
    – pradyunsg
    Jan 30, 2013 at 9:35
  • 1
    can someone explain the regex used here?
    – markroxor
    Mar 19, 2018 at 10:05
  • 3
    @markroxor the first regex groups '(' and ']' into group 1(by surrounding it with parentheses) and ')' and ']' into group 2., matching these groups and all characters that come in between the two groups. After matching, the matched portion is substituted with groups 1 and 2, leaving the final string with nothing inside the brackets. The second regex is self explanatory from this -> match everything and substitute with empty string. Hope it helps Apr 17, 2018 at 17:38
26

Run this script, it works even with nested brackets.
Uses basic logical tests.

def a(test_str):
    ret = ''
    skip1c = 0
    skip2c = 0
    for i in test_str:
        if i == '[':
            skip1c += 1
        elif i == '(':
            skip2c += 1
        elif i == ']' and skip1c > 0:
            skip1c -= 1
        elif i == ')'and skip2c > 0:
            skip2c -= 1
        elif skip1c == 0 and skip2c == 0:
            ret += i
    return ret

x = "ewq[a [(b] ([c))]] This is a sentence. (once a day) [twice a day]"
x = a(x)
print x
print repr(x)

Just incase you don't run it,
Here's the output:

>>> 
ewq This is a sentence.  
'ewq This is a sentence.  ' 
0
17

Here's a solution similar to @pradyunsg's answer (it works with arbitrary nested brackets):

def remove_text_inside_brackets(text, brackets="()[]"):
    count = [0] * (len(brackets) // 2) # count open/close brackets
    saved_chars = []
    for character in text:
        for i, b in enumerate(brackets):
            if character == b: # found bracket
                kind, is_close = divmod(i, 2)
                count[kind] += (-1)**is_close # `+1`: open, `-1`: close
                if count[kind] < 0: # unbalanced bracket
                    count[kind] = 0  # keep it
                else:  # found bracket to remove
                    break
        else: # character is not a [balanced] bracket
            if not any(count): # outside brackets
                saved_chars.append(character)
    return ''.join(saved_chars)

print(repr(remove_text_inside_brackets(
    "This is a sentence. (once a day) [twice a day]")))
# -> 'This is a sentence.  '
2
  • 2
    Looks complex at first glance, but is better than mine (and definitely the accepted (my opinion))
    – pradyunsg
    Mar 17, 2013 at 15:54
  • Excellent answer.
    – pdrak
    Sep 25, 2020 at 9:55
13

This should work for parentheses. Regular expressions will "consume" the text it has matched so it won't work for nested parentheses.

import re
regex = re.compile(".*?\((.*?)\)")
result = re.findall(regex, mystring)

or this would find one set of parentheses, simply loop to find more:

start = mystring.find("(")
end = mystring.find(")")
if start != -1 and end != -1:
  result = mystring[start+1:end]
2
  • 27
    I don't know why this answer as marked as correct. The question in asking to remove text, not return it. I had the same need (remove text between certain chars) and @jvallver's answer helped me. Sep 30, 2015 at 19:08
  • 7
    This achieves opposite than OP asked for
    – simone
    Dec 7, 2017 at 17:16
3

You can split, filter, and join the string again. If your brackets are well defined the following code should do.

import re
x = "".join(re.split("\(|\)|\[|\]", x)[::2])
2
  • 1
    Very late, but very better. :-P
    – Zach
    Feb 7 at 13:55
  • Just what I needed - short and sweet!
    – TCSGrad
    Apr 24 at 19:49
0

You can try this. Can remove the bracket and the content exist inside it.

 import re
    x = "This is a sentence. (once a day) [twice a day]"
    x = re.sub("\(.*?\)|\[.*?\]","",x)
    print(x)

Expected ouput :

This is a sentence. 

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