14

I need a cursor for the below query so I can loop through to fetch/update/insert some other data. Can somebody help me with this?

DECLARE @FROMDATE DATETIME
DECLARE @TODATE DATETIME
SELECT @FROMDATE = Getdate()
SELECT @TODATE = Getdate() + 7

;WITH DATEINFO(DATES)
     AS (SELECT @FROMDATE
         UNION ALL
         SELECT DATES + 1
         FROM   DATEINFO
         WHERE  DATES < @TODATE)
SELECT *
FROM   DATEINFO
OPTION (MAXRECURSION 0)

I tried so many ways, but didn't find any that worked.

I'm Using

declare @adate datetime
DECLARE @FROMDATE DATETIME 
DECLARE @TODATE DATETIME 
select @FROMDATE=getdate()
select @TODATE =getdate()+7

declare @weekdates cursor for
WITH DATEINFO(DATES) AS (SELECT @FROMDATE UNION ALL SELECT DATES + 1 FROM DATEINFO WHERE DATES < @TODATE) 
SELECT * FROM DATEINFO OPTION (MAXRECURSION 0)

open @weekdates
fetch next from @weekdates into @adate
while @@fetch_status=0
begin
print 'success'
fetch next from @weekdates into @adate
end
close @weekdates
deallocate @weekdates

Still I'm getting errors

26

Just put it in before the common table expression:

DECLARE @FROMDATE DATETIME 
DECLARE @TODATE DATETIME 
select @FROMDATE=getdate()
select @TODATE =getdate()+7

declare boris cursor for

WITH DATEINFO(DATES)
     AS (SELECT @FROMDATE
         UNION ALL
         SELECT DATES + 1
         FROM   DATEINFO
         WHERE  DATES < @TODATE)
SELECT *
FROM   DATEINFO
OPTION (MAXRECURSION 0) 

(However, insert usual cautions about cursors almost always being the wrong tool for the job. If you can find a way to do the whole operation in a set based manner, it's usually preferable, and likely to perform better (or at least be more amenable to performance tuning))

  • 2
    Dare I ask why you called your cursor boris? :-) – Bridge Jan 30 '13 at 11:02
  • 3
    @Bridge - sorry, force of habit. I can never seem to come up with a decent name for cursors - they're either a) trivial to understand by reading the trivial select statement, or b) so complex to understand that you'll bust the limits of sysname in trying to describe them. So they tend to be named boris in my code – Damien_The_Unbeliever Jan 30 '13 at 11:18
  • 1
    @user1776417 What error did it throw? Did you exactly copy and paste? Did you remember to get rid of the semi-colon? Remember to close & deallocate boris when you're done. – Bridge Jan 30 '13 at 11:25
  • 6
    Cursor variables can begin with @ in which case they are automatically closed and deallocated when they go out of scope. – Martin Smith Jan 30 '13 at 15:36
  • 6
    (Change the declaration to DECLARE @boris CURSOR;SET @boris = CURSOR FOR ... for this) – Martin Smith Jan 30 '13 at 15:45
12

It is fine to use @ in a cursor name but the syntax you are using is wrong.

DECLARE @adate DATETIME
DECLARE @FROMDATE DATETIME
DECLARE @TODATE DATETIME

SELECT @FROMDATE = getdate()

SELECT @TODATE = getdate() + 7

DECLARE @weekdates CURSOR;

SET @weekdates = CURSOR FOR
WITH DATEINFO(DATES)
     AS (SELECT @FROMDATE
         UNION ALL
         SELECT DATES + 1
         FROM   DATEINFO
         WHERE  DATES < @TODATE)
SELECT *
FROM   DATEINFO
OPTION (MAXRECURSION 0) 

OPEN @weekdates

FETCH next FROM @weekdates INTO @adate

WHILE @@fetch_status = 0
  BEGIN
      PRINT 'success'

      FETCH next FROM @weekdates INTO @adate
  END

When declared as a local @ variable the cursor is automatically closed and deallocated when the variable goes out of scope.

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