3

I have a very interesting situation , i have figured out that Singleton pattern is not all possible with .net framework (Any version)

look at this code below

namespace SingletonPattern
{
    class Singleton
    {
    private static readonly Singleton instance = new Singleton();
    private static int mcount = 0;

    private Singleton() {

        mcount += 1;
        Console.WriteLine("Creating {0} instances of Singleton Class", mcount.ToString());
    }

    public static Singleton Instance
    {
        get
        {
            return instance;
        }
    }
}

class program
{
    static void Main()
    {
        for (int i = 0; i < 1000; i++)
        {
            System.Activator.CreateInstance(Type.GetType("SingletonPattern.Singleton"), true);
        }

        Console.ReadLine();


        }
    }
}

with the help of System.activator any buddy can break singleton pattern.

so who's at risk ?

any guy who wrote some licensing component where license is implemented as a singleton pattern.

Any server based code which makes use of Singleton pattern.

Maybe I am wrong or my discovery does not make sense but i just wanna share and want to know your views?

4
  • 20
    If you use a singleton to enforce any kind of security (such as preventing license violations), then your code (and not the singleton) is fundamentally broken. A singleton is a design pattern meant to make your code easier to maintain (whether or not it achieves this is a different matter). It was never intended to enforce or provide any kind of security. In general, using reflection you can access all private members, not just constructors. That doesn't mean the .NET framework is broken. It provides some features for ease of use, but they never pretended to be "secure" Commented Sep 22, 2009 at 15:59
  • 5
    Since he's asking for input and views, why would you vote him down. Just educate him (as many answerers have done). Commented Sep 22, 2009 at 16:02
  • What the use of feature if it is leading to some bad situation. but thanks for your Vote and responses
    – Saurabh
    Commented Sep 22, 2009 at 16:22
  • 1
    The problem is that Activator.CreateInstance can be used in many good situations, especially dealing with Reflection and dynamically loading/executing/creating types. Unfortunately most if not all good things can be re-purposed for nefarious things (, at least in programming).
    – RCIX
    Commented Sep 23, 2009 at 4:18

9 Answers 9

28

Just because it is possible to deliberately circumvent a pattern in this way does not mean that the pattern itself is "not possible".

1
  • 1
    Actually, this guy has a point. If you have valid reasons to create a singleton (for whatever reason you only want 1 of your class in existence), then you can just use Activator.CreateInstance anytime you want a copy (overriding your Singleton
    – RCIX
    Commented Sep 23, 2009 at 4:19
13

It is true that this implementation of a singleton is wrong, but that doesn't mean that someone couldn't create a better singleton implementation.

1
11

By the same token, all private methods are not private because you can access them using reflection.

I don't see a problem with this.

7

To use System.Activator.CreateInstance, you need high permissions. Of course if you're allowed to ignore access modifiers because the system trusts you, then you can break code that depends on consumers respecting access modifiers.

Normally, code does not usually have these permissions.

1
  • 1
    Exactly. If you grant code permission to do something, then you can't complain about the fact that it has permission to do it.
    – Greg Beech
    Commented Sep 22, 2009 at 16:05
4

I don't think design patterns are a form of security as much as a way to encourage a certain usage. If someone is going to that much trouble to work around the constraints of your design, they get what they deserve.

2

Every client-side licensing scheme can be broken.

You could work around this by throwing an exception if the counter is greater 1 - but then again, the other code could use Reflection to reset the counter. The calling code could even modify your assembly before loading it, completely removing the licensing code!

No programming language, obfuscator, etc. can completely protect you against this - if it was possible, surely game publishers would have already used it to create unbreakable copy protection!

As soon as you've got untrusted code in the same 'security zone' as your code; you've already lost.

2

if you want to protect against this edge case just change private ctor:

private Singleton() { throw new ApplicationException{
     "Don't call System.Activator.CreateInstance on this class"); }

And then you'll then have to add another parameterized private ctor to actually create the singleton... perhaps with a secret parameter that only the initalizer will know how to pass... entire class would be:

class Singleton
{    
   private static readonly Singleton inst = new Singleton("MySecretWord");    
   private static int mcount = 0;   
   private Singleton(string secret)
   { if (secret != "MySecretWord")  
       throw new ApplicationException{
           "Don't call Private constructor on this class"); 
   }
   private Singleton() { throw new ApplicationException{
     "Don't call System.Activator.CreateInstance on this class"); }
  public static Singleton Instance { get  {  return inst ;  } }
}

But why go to all this trouble ? if someone wants to go to the trouble to break your singleton pattern using CreateInstance, then that's there problem, no?

6
  • Erm, sorry if im being stupid, but that wouldnt work as the private constructor needs to be called.
    – Fen
    Commented Sep 22, 2009 at 15:57
  • @darren, editing while you commented, to add exactly that point! Commented Sep 22, 2009 at 15:58
  • 1
    And even then they could just use a tool like reflector to find your secret word..
    – markt
    Commented Sep 22, 2009 at 16:10
  • @markt, wouldn't CreateInstance have to be recoded in the CLR framework to even CALL the parameterized private ctor? Commented Sep 22, 2009 at 17:56
  • Probably you are correct -- I didn't realize that you could only call parameterless private constructors with CreateInstance.. interesting.
    – markt
    Commented Sep 22, 2009 at 22:15
0

If you are concerned about other code attempting to break this pattern, you could use something like a lock, or a semaphore or mutex,etc.. in your implementation to manage the number of instances.

...which might end up making it just a little bit more difficult, as reflection may still be used again to circumvent this...

But - with a locking mechanism, you will take a performance hit, so you have weigh the benefits..

0

Check the stack trace in your private constructor to ensure that it is only getting invoked from the Singleton class and not from anywhere else.

using System;
using System.Diagnostics;

class Program
{
    public static void Main(string[] args)
    {
        //This should work and not throw any exception
        Singleton singleton = Singleton.Instance;
        Debug.Assert(singleton != null);

        //This should throw an exception
        Singleton s = (Singleton)Activator.CreateInstance(typeof(Singleton), true);
    }
}

public class Singleton
{
    private static Singleton uniqueInstance = new Singleton();

    private Singleton() 
    {
        StackTrace trace = new StackTrace();
        StackFrame frame = trace.GetFrame(1);

        //Check that the private constructor is only getting invoked by the static initializer, otherwise throw exception
        if (String.Compare(trace.GetFrame(1).GetMethod().Name, ".cctor") != 0)
            throw new InvalidOperationException(
                "Don't call Private constructor on this class. Abide by Singleton semantics.");
    }

    public static Singleton Instance { get { return uniqueInstance; } }
}

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