401

I need a robust and simple way to remove illegal path and file characters from a simple string. I've used the below code but it doesn't seem to do anything, what am I missing?

using System;
using System.IO;

namespace ConsoleApplication1
{
    class Program
    {
        static void Main(string[] args)
        {
            string illegal = "\"M<>\"\\a/ry/ h**ad:>> a\\/:*?\"<>| li*tt|le|| la\"mb.?";

            illegal = illegal.Trim(Path.GetInvalidFileNameChars());
            illegal = illegal.Trim(Path.GetInvalidPathChars());

            Console.WriteLine(illegal);
            Console.ReadLine();
        }
    }
}
  • Trim removes characters from the beginning and end of strings. However, you probably should ask why the data is invalid, and rather than try and sanitize/fix the data, reject the data. – user7116 Sep 28 '08 at 15:54
  • 8
    Unix style names are not valid on Windows and i don't want to deal with 8.3 shortnames. – Gary Willoughby Oct 16 '09 at 12:04
  • GetInvalidFileNameChars() will strip things like : \ etc from folder paths. – CAD bloke May 20 '16 at 3:18
  • 1
    Path.GetInvalidPathChars() doesn't seem to strip * or ? – CAD bloke May 20 '16 at 3:24
  • 13
    I tested five answers from this question (timed loop of 100,000) and the following method is the fastest. The regular expression took 2nd place, and was 25% slower : public string GetSafeFilename(string filename) { return string.Join("_", filename.Split(Path.GetInvalidFileNameChars())); } – Brain2000 Jul 15 '16 at 15:20

26 Answers 26

461

Try something like this instead;

string illegal = "\"M\"\\a/ry/ h**ad:>> a\\/:*?\"| li*tt|le|| la\"mb.?";
string invalid = new string(Path.GetInvalidFileNameChars()) + new string(Path.GetInvalidPathChars());

foreach (char c in invalid)
{
    illegal = illegal.Replace(c.ToString(), ""); 
}

But I have to agree with the comments, I'd probably try to deal with the source of the illegal paths, rather than try to mangle an illegal path into a legitimate but probably unintended one.

Edit: Or a potentially 'better' solution, using Regex's.

string illegal = "\"M\"\\a/ry/ h**ad:>> a\\/:*?\"| li*tt|le|| la\"mb.?";
string regexSearch = new string(Path.GetInvalidFileNameChars()) + new string(Path.GetInvalidPathChars());
Regex r = new Regex(string.Format("[{0}]", Regex.Escape(regexSearch)));
illegal = r.Replace(illegal, "");

Still, the question begs to be asked, why you're doing this in the first place.

  • 30
    It's not necessary to append the two lists together. The illegal file name char list contains the illegal path char list and has a few more. Here are lists of both lists cast to int: 34,60,62,124,0,1,2,3,4,5,6,7,8,9,10,11,12,13,14,15,16,17,18,19,20,21,22,23,24,25,26,27,28,29,30,31,58,42,63,92,47 34,60,62,124,0,1,2,3,4,5,6,7,8,9,10,11,12,13,14,15,16,17,18,19,20,21,22,23,24,25,26,27,28,29,30,31 – Sarel Botha Apr 11 '11 at 18:12
  • 7
    @sjbotha this may be true on Windows and Microsoft's implementation of .NET I'm not willing to make the same assumption for say mono running Linux. – Matthew Scharley Apr 17 '11 at 1:24
  • 7
    Regarding the first solution. Shouldn't a StringBuilder be more efficient than the string assignments? – epignosisx Dec 30 '11 at 15:53
  • 5
    For what it's worth, @MatthewScharley, the Mono implementation of GetInvalidPathChars() returns only 0x00 and GetInvalidFileNameChars() returns only 0x00 and '/' when running on non-Windows platforms. On Windows, the lists of invalid characters is much longer, and GetInvalidPathChars() is entirely duplicated inside GetInvalidFileNameChars(). This isn't going to change in the forseeable future, so all you're really doing is doubling the amount of time this function takes to run because you're worried that the definition of a valid path will change sometime soon. Which it won't. – Warren Rumak Jan 27 '14 at 19:09
  • 9
    @Charleh this discussion is so unnecessary... code should always be optimized and there is no risk of this to be incorrect. A filename is a part of the path, too. So it is just illogical that GetInvalidPathChars() could contain characters that GetInvalidFileNameChars() wouldn't. You are not taking correctness over "premature" optimisation. You are simply using bad code. – Stefan Fabian Aug 9 '14 at 11:54
265

The original question asked to "remove illegal characters":

public string RemoveInvalidChars(string filename)
{
    return string.Concat(filename.Split(Path.GetInvalidFileNameChars()));
}

You may instead want to replace them:

public string ReplaceInvalidChars(string filename)
{
    return string.Join("_", filename.Split(Path.GetInvalidFileNameChars()));    
}

This answer was on another thread by Ceres, I really like it neat and simple.

  • 9
    To precisely answer the OP's question, you would need to use "" instead of "_", but your answer probably applies to more of us in practice. I think replacing illegal characters with some legal one is more commonly done. – B H Jan 8 '16 at 20:27
  • 4
    This is a fantastic answer. I don't know about the performance, but it is very easy to read and understand. – PRMan Jul 4 '16 at 2:27
  • 27
    I tested five methods from this question (timed loop of 100,000) and this method is the fastest one. The regular expression took 2nd place, and was 25% slower than this method. – Brain2000 Jul 15 '16 at 15:19
  • 3
    This is genius! – Dan Bechard Jan 19 '17 at 20:05
  • 9
    To address @BH 's comment, one can simply use string.Concat(name.Split(Path.GetInvalidFileNameChars())) – Michael Sutton Jun 7 '17 at 14:06
204

I use Linq to clean up filenames. You can easily extend this to check for valid paths as well.

private static string CleanFileName(string fileName)
{
    return Path.GetInvalidFileNameChars().Aggregate(fileName, (current, c) => current.Replace(c.ToString(), string.Empty));
}

Update

Some comments indicate this method is not working for them so I've included a link to a DotNetFiddle snippet so you may validate the method.

https://dotnetfiddle.net/nw1SWY

  • 4
    This did not work for me. The method is not returning the clean string. It is returning the passed filename as it is. – Karan Jul 17 '13 at 6:29
  • What @Karan said, this does not work, the original string comes back. – Jon Mar 20 '14 at 15:26
  • You can actually do this with Linq like this though: var invalid = new HashSet<char>(Path.GetInvalidPathChars()); return new string(originalString.Where(s => !invalid.Contains(s)).ToArray()). Performance probably isn't great but that probably doesn't matter. – Casey Jul 9 '15 at 14:12
  • 2
    @Karan or Jon What input are you sending this function? See my edit for verification of this method. – Michael Minton Sep 24 '15 at 2:45
  • 2
    It's easy - guys were passing strings with valid chars. Upvoted for cool Aggregate solution. – Nickmaovich Jan 20 '16 at 13:10
87

You can remove illegal chars using Linq like this:

var invalidChars = Path.GetInvalidFileNameChars();

var invalidCharsRemoved = stringWithInvalidChars
.Where(x => !invalidChars.Contains(x))
.ToArray();

EDIT
This is how it looks with the required edit mentioned in the comments:

var invalidChars = Path.GetInvalidFileNameChars();

string invalidCharsRemoved = new string(stringWithInvalidChars
  .Where(x => !invalidChars.Contains(x))
  .ToArray());
  • 1
    I like this way : you keep only the allowed chars in the string (which is nothing else than a char array). – Dude Pascalou Jul 4 '12 at 9:36
  • 5
    I know that this is an old question, but this is an awesome answer. However, I wanted to add that in c# you cannot cast from char[] to string either implicitly or explicitly (crazy, I know) so you'll need to drop it into a string constructor. – JNYRanger Oct 21 '14 at 18:52
  • 1
    I haven't confirmed this, but I expect Path.GetInvalidPathChars() to be a superset of GetInvalidFileNameChars() and to cover both filenames and paths, so I would probably use that instead. – angularsen Jan 9 '15 at 22:11
  • 2
    This should be the answer instead of those horrible looking Regex entries! ;) – Jeb Sep 3 '15 at 16:22
  • 2
    @anjdreas actually Path.GetInvalidPathChars() seems to be a subset of Path.GetInvalidFileNameChars(), not the other way round. Path.GetInvalidPathChars() will not return '?', for example. – Rafael Costa Dec 30 '15 at 10:21
26

These are all great solutions, but they all rely on Path.GetInvalidFileNameChars, which may not be as reliable as you'd think. Notice the following remark in the MSDN documentation on Path.GetInvalidFileNameChars:

The array returned from this method is not guaranteed to contain the complete set of characters that are invalid in file and directory names. The full set of invalid characters can vary by file system. For example, on Windows-based desktop platforms, invalid path characters might include ASCII/Unicode characters 1 through 31, as well as quote ("), less than (<), greater than (>), pipe (|), backspace (\b), null (\0) and tab (\t).

It's not any better with Path.GetInvalidPathChars method. It contains the exact same remark.

  • 12
    Then what is the point of Path.GetInvalidFileNameChars? I would expect it to return exactly the invalid characters for the current system, relying on .NET to know which filesystem I'm running on and presenting me the fitting invalid chars. If this is not the case and it just returns hardcoded characters, which are not reliable in the first place, this method should be removed since it has zero value. – Jan Jan 18 '14 at 18:08
  • 1
    I know this is a old comment but, @Jan you could want to write on another filesystem, maybe this is why there is a warning. – fantastik78 Jul 7 '15 at 13:59
  • 3
    @fantastik78 good point, but in this case I would want to have an additional enum argument to specify my remote FS. If this is too much maintenance effort (which is most likely case), this whole method is still a bad idea, because it gives you the wrong impression of safety. – Jan Sep 3 '15 at 10:33
  • 1
    @Jan I totally agree with you, I was just arguing about the warning. – fantastik78 Sep 3 '15 at 14:39
  • Interestingly this is a sort of "blacklisting" invalid chars. Would it not be better to "whitelist" only the known valid chars here?! Reminds me of the stupid "virusscanner" idea instead of whitelisting allowed apps.... – Bernhard Jul 10 '18 at 8:48
21

For file names:

string cleanFileName = String.Join("", fileName.Split(Path.GetInvalidFileNameChars()));

For full paths:

string cleanPath = String.Join("", path.Split(Path.GetInvalidPathChars()));

Note that if you intend to use this as a security feature, a more robust approach would be to expand all paths and then verify that the user supplied path is indeed a child of a directory the user should have access to.

  • Very tricky and intelligent solution! ThumbUp – Bernhard Feb 27 '18 at 13:59
18

For starters, Trim only removes characters from the beginning or end of the string. Secondly, you should evaluate if you really want to remove the offensive characters, or fail fast and let the user know their filename is invalid. My choice is the latter, but my answer should at least show you how to do things the right AND wrong way:

StackOverflow question showing how to check if a given string is a valid file name. Note you can use the regex from this question to remove characters with a regular expression replacement (if you really need to do this).

  • I especially agree with the second advice. – OregonGhost Sep 28 '08 at 15:59
  • 4
    I would normally agree with the second, but I have a program which generates a filename and which may contain illegal characters in some situations. Since my program is generating the illegal filenames, I think it's appropriate to remove/replace those characters. (Just pointing out a valid use-case) – JDB May 9 '13 at 15:48
16

I use regular expressions to achieve this. First, I dynamically build the regex.

string regex = string.Format(
                   "[{0}]",
                   Regex.Escape(new string(Path.GetInvalidFileNameChars())));
Regex removeInvalidChars = new Regex(regex, RegexOptions.Singleline | RegexOptions.Compiled | RegexOptions.CultureInvariant);

Then I just call removeInvalidChars.Replace to do the find and replace. This can obviously be extended to cover path chars as well.

  • That code doesn't work for some reason. – Bryan Legend Feb 6 '10 at 21:52
  • Strange, it has been working for me. I'll double-check it when I get chance. Can you be more specific and explain what exactly isn't working for you? – Jeff Yates Feb 8 '10 at 15:56
  • 1
    It won't work (properly at the very least) because you aren't escaping the path characters properly, and some of them have a special meaning. Refer to my answer for how to do that. – Matthew Scharley Apr 8 '10 at 21:39
  • @Jeff: Your version is still better than Matthew's, if you slightly modify it. Refer to my answer on how. – Jan Feb 13 '12 at 8:28
  • 2
    I would also add some other invalid file name patterns that can be found on MSDN and extend your solution to the following regex: new Regex(String.Format("^(CON|PRN|AUX|NUL|CLOCK\$|COM[1-9]|LPT[1-9])(?=\..|$)|(^(\.+|\s+)$)|((\.+|\s+)$)|([{0}])", Regex.Escape(new String(Path.GetInvalidFileNameChars()))), RegexOptions.Compiled | RegexOptions.Singleline | RegexOptions.CultureInvariant); – yar_shukan Sep 10 '14 at 14:46
15

The best way to remove illegal character from user input is to replace illegal character using Regex class, create method in code behind or also it validate at client side using RegularExpression control.

public string RemoveSpecialCharacters(string str)
{
    return Regex.Replace(str, "[^a-zA-Z0-9_]+", "_", RegexOptions.Compiled);
}

OR

<asp:RegularExpressionValidator ID="regxFolderName" 
                                runat="server" 
                                ErrorMessage="Enter folder name with  a-z A-Z0-9_" 
                                ControlToValidate="txtFolderName" 
                                Display="Dynamic" 
                                ValidationExpression="^[a-zA-Z0-9_]*$" 
                                ForeColor="Red">
  • 4
    IMHO this solution is much better than others Instead of searching for all invalid chars just define which are valid. – igorushi Sep 29 '15 at 7:55
  • Good solution +1 – Priyankara Oct 2 '16 at 13:10
14

I absolutely prefer the idea of Jeff Yates. It will work perfectly, if you slightly modify it:

string regex = String.Format("[{0}]", Regex.Escape(new string(Path.GetInvalidFileNameChars())));
Regex removeInvalidChars = new Regex(regex, RegexOptions.Singleline | RegexOptions.Compiled | RegexOptions.CultureInvariant);

The improvement is just to escape the automaticially generated regex.

11

Here's a code snippet that should help for .NET 3 and higher.

using System.IO;
using System.Text.RegularExpressions;

public static class PathValidation
{
    private static string pathValidatorExpression = "^[^" + string.Join("", Array.ConvertAll(Path.GetInvalidPathChars(), x => Regex.Escape(x.ToString()))) + "]+$";
    private static Regex pathValidator = new Regex(pathValidatorExpression, RegexOptions.Compiled);

    private static string fileNameValidatorExpression = "^[^" + string.Join("", Array.ConvertAll(Path.GetInvalidFileNameChars(), x => Regex.Escape(x.ToString()))) + "]+$";
    private static Regex fileNameValidator = new Regex(fileNameValidatorExpression, RegexOptions.Compiled);

    private static string pathCleanerExpression = "[" + string.Join("", Array.ConvertAll(Path.GetInvalidPathChars(), x => Regex.Escape(x.ToString()))) + "]";
    private static Regex pathCleaner = new Regex(pathCleanerExpression, RegexOptions.Compiled);

    private static string fileNameCleanerExpression = "[" + string.Join("", Array.ConvertAll(Path.GetInvalidFileNameChars(), x => Regex.Escape(x.ToString()))) + "]";
    private static Regex fileNameCleaner = new Regex(fileNameCleanerExpression, RegexOptions.Compiled);

    public static bool ValidatePath(string path)
    {
        return pathValidator.IsMatch(path);
    }

    public static bool ValidateFileName(string fileName)
    {
        return fileNameValidator.IsMatch(fileName);
    }

    public static string CleanPath(string path)
    {
        return pathCleaner.Replace(path, "");
    }

    public static string CleanFileName(string fileName)
    {
        return fileNameCleaner.Replace(fileName, "");
    }
}
8

Most solutions above combine illegal chars for both path and filename which is wrong (even when both calls currently return the same set of chars). I would first split the path+filename in path and filename, then apply the appropriate set to either if them and then combine the two again.

wvd_vegt

  • +1: Very true. Today, working in .NET 4.0, the regex solution from the top answer nuked all backslashes in a full path. So I made a regex for the dir path and a regex for just the filename, cleaned separately and recombined – dario_ramos May 22 '13 at 21:03
  • That might be true but this doesn't answer the question. I'm not sure a vague 'I'd do it like this' is terribly helpful compared to some of the complete solutions already in here (see for example Lilly's answer, below) – Ian Grainger May 12 '16 at 11:20
6

If you remove or replace with a single character the invalid characters, you can have collisions:

<abc -> abc
>abc -> abc

Here is a simple method to avoid this:

public static string ReplaceInvalidFileNameChars(string s)
{
    char[] invalidFileNameChars = System.IO.Path.GetInvalidFileNameChars();
    foreach (char c in invalidFileNameChars)
        s = s.Replace(c.ToString(), "[" + Array.IndexOf(invalidFileNameChars, c) + "]");
    return s;
}

The result:

 <abc -> [1]abc
 >abc -> [2]abc
5

Throw an exception.

if ( fileName.IndexOfAny(Path.GetInvalidFileNameChars()) > -1 )
            {
                throw new ArgumentException();
            }
4

I wrote this monster for fun, it lets you roundtrip:

public static class FileUtility
{
    private const char PrefixChar = '%';
    private static readonly int MaxLength;
    private static readonly Dictionary<char,char[]> Illegals;
    static FileUtility()
    {
        List<char> illegal = new List<char> { PrefixChar };
        illegal.AddRange(Path.GetInvalidFileNameChars());
        MaxLength = illegal.Select(x => ((int)x).ToString().Length).Max();
        Illegals = illegal.ToDictionary(x => x, x => ((int)x).ToString("D" + MaxLength).ToCharArray());
    }

    public static string FilenameEncode(string s)
    {
        var builder = new StringBuilder();
        char[] replacement;
        using (var reader = new StringReader(s))
        {
            while (true)
            {
                int read = reader.Read();
                if (read == -1)
                    break;
                char c = (char)read;
                if(Illegals.TryGetValue(c,out replacement))
                {
                    builder.Append(PrefixChar);
                    builder.Append(replacement);
                }
                else
                {
                    builder.Append(c);
                }
            }
        }
        return builder.ToString();
    }

    public static string FilenameDecode(string s)
    {
        var builder = new StringBuilder();
        char[] buffer = new char[MaxLength];
        using (var reader = new StringReader(s))
        {
            while (true)
            {
                int read = reader.Read();
                if (read == -1)
                    break;
                char c = (char)read;
                if (c == PrefixChar)
                {
                    reader.Read(buffer, 0, MaxLength);
                    var encoded =(char) ParseCharArray(buffer);
                    builder.Append(encoded);
                }
                else
                {
                    builder.Append(c);
                }
            }
        }
        return builder.ToString();
    }

    public static int ParseCharArray(char[] buffer)
    {
        int result = 0;
        foreach (char t in buffer)
        {
            int digit = t - '0';
            if ((digit < 0) || (digit > 9))
            {
                throw new ArgumentException("Input string was not in the correct format");
            }
            result *= 10;
            result += digit;
        }
        return result;
    }
}
  • 1
    I like this because it avoids having two different strings creating the same resulting path. – Kim Jan 29 '14 at 16:25
3

I think it is much easier to validate using a regex and specifiing which characters are allowed, instead of trying to check for all bad characters. See these links: http://www.c-sharpcorner.com/UploadFile/prasad_1/RegExpPSD12062005021717AM/RegExpPSD.aspx http://www.windowsdevcenter.com/pub/a/oreilly/windows/news/csharp_0101.html

Also, do a search for "regular expression editor"s, they help a lot. There are some around which even output the code in c# for you.

  • Given that .net is a framework that is intended to allow programs to run on multiple platforms (e.g. Linux/Unix as well as Windows), I feel Path.GetInvalidFileNameChars() is best since it will contain the knowledge of what is or isn't valid on the filesystem your program is being run on. Even if your program will never run on Linux (maybe it's full of WPF code), there's always the chance some new Windows filesystem will come along in the future and have different valid/invalid chars. Rolling your own with regex is reinventing the wheel, and shifting a platform issue into your own code. – Daniel Scott Oct 3 '18 at 23:54
  • I agree with your advice on online regex editors/testers though. I find them invaluable (since regexes are tricky things, and full of subtlety that can trip you up easily, giving you a regex that behaves in some wildly unexpected way with edge cases). My favourite is regex101.com (I like how it breaks the regex down and shows you clearly what it expects to match). I also quite like debuggex.com as it's got a compact visual representation of match groups and character classes and whatnot. – Daniel Scott Oct 4 '18 at 0:05
2

This seems to be O(n) and does not spend too much memory on strings:

    private static readonly HashSet<char> invalidFileNameChars = new HashSet<char>(Path.GetInvalidFileNameChars());

    public static string RemoveInvalidFileNameChars(string name)
    {
        if (!name.Any(c => invalidFileNameChars.Contains(c))) {
            return name;
        }

        return new string(name.Where(c => !invalidFileNameChars.Contains(c)).ToArray());
    }
  • 1
    I don't think it's O(n) when you use the 'Any' function. – II ARROWS Aug 30 '16 at 10:42
  • @IIARROWS and what is it in your opinion? – Alexey F Aug 30 '16 at 12:32
  • I don't know, it just didn't felt like that when I wrote my comment... now that I tried to calculate it, looks like you're right. – II ARROWS Aug 30 '16 at 19:48
2

Scanning over the answers here, they all** seem to involve using a char array of invalid filename characters.

Granted, this may be micro-optimising - but for the benefit of anyone who might be looking to check a large number of values for being valid filenames, it's worth noting that building a hashset of invalid chars will bring about notably better performance.

I have been very surprised (shocked) in the past just how quickly a hashset (or dictionary) outperforms iterating over a list. With strings, it's a ridiculously low number (about 5-7 items from memory). With most other simple data (object references, numbers etc) the magic crossover seems to be around 20 items.

There are 40 invalid characters in the Path.InvalidFileNameChars "list". Did a search today and there's quite a good benchmark here on StackOverflow that shows the hashset will take a little over half the time of an array/list for 40 items: https://stackoverflow.com/a/10762995/949129

Here's the helper class I use for sanitising paths. I forget now why I had the fancy replacement option in it, but it's there as a cute bonus.

Additional bonus method "IsValidLocalPath" too :)

(** those which don't use regular expressions)

public static class PathExtensions
{
    private static HashSet<char> _invalidFilenameChars;
    private static HashSet<char> InvalidFilenameChars
    {
        get { return _invalidFilenameChars ?? (_invalidFilenameChars = new HashSet<char>(Path.GetInvalidFileNameChars())); }
    }


    /// <summary>Replaces characters in <c>text</c> that are not allowed in file names with the 
    /// specified replacement character.</summary>
    /// <param name="text">Text to make into a valid filename. The same string is returned if 
    /// it is valid already.</param>
    /// <param name="replacement">Replacement character, or NULL to remove bad characters.</param>
    /// <param name="fancyReplacements">TRUE to replace quotes and slashes with the non-ASCII characters ” and ⁄.</param>
    /// <returns>A string that can be used as a filename. If the output string would otherwise be empty, "_" is returned.</returns>
    public static string ToValidFilename(this string text, char? replacement = '_', bool fancyReplacements = false)
    {
        StringBuilder sb = new StringBuilder(text.Length);
        HashSet<char> invalids = InvalidFilenameChars;
        bool changed = false;

        for (int i = 0; i < text.Length; i++)
        {
            char c = text[i];
            if (invalids.Contains(c))
            {
                changed = true;
                char repl = replacement ?? '\0';
                if (fancyReplacements)
                {
                    if (c == '"') repl = '”'; // U+201D right double quotation mark
                    else if (c == '\'') repl = '’'; // U+2019 right single quotation mark
                    else if (c == '/') repl = '⁄'; // U+2044 fraction slash
                }
                if (repl != '\0')
                    sb.Append(repl);
            }
            else
                sb.Append(c);
        }

        if (sb.Length == 0)
            return "_";

        return changed ? sb.ToString() : text;
    }


    /// <summary>
    /// Returns TRUE if the specified path is a valid, local filesystem path.
    /// </summary>
    /// <param name="pathString"></param>
    /// <returns></returns>
    public static bool IsValidLocalPath(this string pathString)
    {
        // From solution at https://stackoverflow.com/a/11636052/949129
        Uri pathUri;
        Boolean isValidUri = Uri.TryCreate(pathString, UriKind.Absolute, out pathUri);
        return isValidUri && pathUri != null && pathUri.IsLoopback;
    }
}
2
public static class StringExtensions
      {
        public static string RemoveUnnecessary(this string source)
        {
            string result = string.Empty;
            string regex = new string(Path.GetInvalidFileNameChars()) + new string(Path.GetInvalidPathChars());
            Regex reg = new Regex(string.Format("[{0}]", Regex.Escape(regex)));
            result = reg.Replace(source, "");
            return result;
        }
    }

You can use method clearly.

2

File name can not contain characters from Path.GetInvalidPathChars(), + and # symbols, and other specific names. We combined all checks into one class:

public static class FileNameExtensions
{
    private static readonly Lazy<string[]> InvalidFileNameChars =
        new Lazy<string[]>(() => Path.GetInvalidPathChars()
            .Union(Path.GetInvalidFileNameChars()
            .Union(new[] { '+', '#' })).Select(c => c.ToString(CultureInfo.InvariantCulture)).ToArray());


    private static readonly HashSet<string> ProhibitedNames = new HashSet<string>
    {
        @"aux",
        @"con",
        @"clock$",
        @"nul",
        @"prn",

        @"com1",
        @"com2",
        @"com3",
        @"com4",
        @"com5",
        @"com6",
        @"com7",
        @"com8",
        @"com9",

        @"lpt1",
        @"lpt2",
        @"lpt3",
        @"lpt4",
        @"lpt5",
        @"lpt6",
        @"lpt7",
        @"lpt8",
        @"lpt9"
    };

    public static bool IsValidFileName(string fileName)
    {
        return !string.IsNullOrWhiteSpace(fileName)
            && fileName.All(o => !IsInvalidFileNameChar(o))
            && !IsProhibitedName(fileName);
    }

    public static bool IsProhibitedName(string fileName)
    {
        return ProhibitedNames.Contains(fileName.ToLower(CultureInfo.InvariantCulture));
    }

    private static string ReplaceInvalidFileNameSymbols([CanBeNull] this string value, string replacementValue)
    {
        if (value == null)
        {
            return null;
        }

        return InvalidFileNameChars.Value.Aggregate(new StringBuilder(value),
            (sb, currentChar) => sb.Replace(currentChar, replacementValue)).ToString();
    }

    public static bool IsInvalidFileNameChar(char value)
    {
        return InvalidFileNameChars.Value.Contains(value.ToString(CultureInfo.InvariantCulture));
    }

    public static string GetValidFileName([NotNull] this string value)
    {
        return GetValidFileName(value, @"_");
    }

    public static string GetValidFileName([NotNull] this string value, string replacementValue)
    {
        if (string.IsNullOrWhiteSpace(value))
        {
            throw new ArgumentException(@"value should be non empty", nameof(value));
        }

        if (IsProhibitedName(value))
        {
            return (string.IsNullOrWhiteSpace(replacementValue) ? @"_" : replacementValue) + value; 
        }

        return ReplaceInvalidFileNameSymbols(value, replacementValue);
    }

    public static string GetFileNameError(string fileName)
    {
        if (string.IsNullOrWhiteSpace(fileName))
        {
            return CommonResources.SelectReportNameError;
        }

        if (IsProhibitedName(fileName))
        {
            return CommonResources.FileNameIsProhibited;
        }

        var invalidChars = fileName.Where(IsInvalidFileNameChar).Distinct().ToArray();

        if(invalidChars.Length > 0)
        {
            return string.Format(CultureInfo.CurrentCulture,
                invalidChars.Length == 1 ? CommonResources.InvalidCharacter : CommonResources.InvalidCharacters,
                StringExtensions.JoinQuoted(@",", @"'", invalidChars.Select(c => c.ToString(CultureInfo.CurrentCulture))));
        }

        return string.Empty;
    }
}

Method GetValidFileName replaces all incorrect data to _.

2

One liner to cleanup string from any illegal chars for windows file naming:

public static string CleanIllegalName(string p_testName) => new Regex(string.Format("[{0}]", Regex.Escape(new string(Path.GetInvalidFileNameChars()) + new string(Path.GetInvalidPathChars())))).Replace(p_testName, "");
1
public static bool IsValidFilename(string testName)
{
    return !new Regex("[" + Regex.Escape(new String(System.IO.Path.GetInvalidFileNameChars())) + "]").IsMatch(testName);
}
0

This will do want you want, and avoid collisions

 static string SanitiseFilename(string key)
    {
        var invalidChars = Path.GetInvalidFileNameChars();
        var sb = new StringBuilder();
        foreach (var c in key)
        {
            var invalidCharIndex = -1;
            for (var i = 0; i < invalidChars.Length; i++)
            {
                if (c == invalidChars[i])
                {
                    invalidCharIndex = i;
                }
            }
            if (invalidCharIndex > -1)
            {
                sb.Append("_").Append(invalidCharIndex);
                continue;
            }

            if (c == '_')
            {
                sb.Append("__");
                continue;
            }

            sb.Append(c);
        }
        return sb.ToString();

    }
0

I think the question already not full answered... The answers only describe clean filename OR path... not both. Here is my solution:

private static string CleanPath(string path)
{
    string regexSearch = new string(Path.GetInvalidFileNameChars()) + new string(Path.GetInvalidPathChars());
    Regex r = new Regex(string.Format("[{0}]", Regex.Escape(regexSearch)));
    List<string> split = path.Split('\\').ToList();
    string returnValue = split.Aggregate(string.Empty, (current, s) => current + (r.Replace(s, "") + @"\"));
    returnValue = returnValue.TrimEnd('\\');
    return returnValue;
}
0

I created an extension method that combines several suggestions:

  1. Holding illegal characters in a hash set
  2. Filtering out characters below ascii 127. Since Path.GetInvalidFileNameChars does not include all invalid characters possible with ascii codes from 0 to 255. See here and MSDN
  3. Possiblity to define the replacement character

Source:

public static class FileNameCorrector
{
    private static HashSet<char> invalid = new HashSet<char>(Path.GetInvalidFileNameChars());

    public static string ToValidFileName(this string name, char replacement = '\0')
    {
        var builder = new StringBuilder();
        foreach (var cur in name)
        {
            if (cur > 31 && cur < 128 && !invalid.Contains(cur))
            {
                builder.Append(cur);
            }
            else if (replacement != '\0')
            {
                builder.Append(replacement);
            }
        }

        return builder.ToString();
    }
}
-6

Or you can just do

[YOUR STRING].Replace('\\', ' ').Replace('/', ' ').Replace('"', ' ').Replace('*', ' ').Replace(':', ' ').Replace('?', ' ').Replace('<', ' ').Replace('>', ' ').Replace('|', ' ').Trim();

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