18

I'm tying myself in knots over a simple problem. I have a class that implements INotifyPropertyChanged. Some of the instance properties' getters use static properties and thus their values may change if the static property changes? Here's a simplified example.

class ExampleClass : INotifyPropertyChanged
{

    private static int _MinimumLength = 5;
    public static int MinimumLength
    {
        get
        {
            return _MinimumLength;
        }
        set
        {
            if (_MinimumLength != value)
            {
                _MinimumLength = value;
                //WHAT GOES HERE
            }
        }
    }

    private int _length = -1;
    public int length
    {
        get
        {
            return (_length > _MinimumLength) ? _length : _MinimumLength;
        }
        set
        {
            var oldValue = (_length > _MinimumLength) ? _length : _MinimumLength;
            if (_length != value)
            {
                _length = value;
                var newValue = (_length > _MinimumLength) ? _length : _MinimumLength;
                if (newValue != oldValue)
                {
                    OnPropertyChanged("length");
                }
            }
        }
    }

    public event PropertyChangedEventHandler PropertyChanged;

    [NotifyPropertyChangedInvocator]
    protected virtual void OnPropertyChanged(string propertyName)
    {
        if (PropertyChanged != null)
        {
            PropertyChanged(this, new PropertyChangedEventArgs(propertyName));
        }
    }

}

Clearly if the static property MinimumLength changes then every instance's property length may also change. But how should the static property signal the possible change to the instances? It cannot call OnPropertyChanged since that is not static.

I could keep a list at the class level of all the instances and call a method on each one, but somehow that feels like overkill. Or I could pull the static properties out into a singleton class but logically they live at the class level. Is there an established pattern for this or should I be thinking about this differently?

13

If you're inclined to maintain that design then I would go with a solution like the following:

public static int MinimumLength
{
    get { return _MinimumLength; }
    set
    {
        if (_MinimumLength != value)
        {
            _MinimumLength = value;
            OnGlobalPropertyChanged("MinimumLength");
        }
    }
}
static event PropertyChangedEventHandler GlobalPropertyChanged = delegate { };
static void OnGlobalPropertyChanged(string propertyName)
{
    GlobalPropertyChanged(
        typeof (ExampleClass), 
        new PropertyChangedEventArgs(propertyName));
}
public ExampleClass()
{
    // This should use a weak event handler instead of normal handler
    GlobalPropertyChanged += this.HandleGlobalPropertyChanged;
}
void HandleGlobalPropertyChanged(object sender, PropertyChangedEventArgs e)
{
    switch (e.PropertyName)
    {
        case "MinimumLength":
            if (length > MinimumLength)
                length = MinimumLength;
            break;
    }
}

This is pretty much equivalent to maintaining a list of instances but I find it more maintainable and clearer. Also, you really need to use a weak event handler strategy, otherwise, your instances will not be garbage collected because they will always be associated with the static event which acts like a GC root.

You can read more about weak event handlers in the following blog posts (which were written by me so I'm biased):

.NET Weak Event Handlers – Part I

.NET Weak Event Handlers – Part I

In an unrelated note your code is currently firing property changed when in fact the property value did not change. For example:

  1. Set MinimumLength to 5;
  2. Set length to 10; (event fires since the value changes from the default 0 to 5)
  3. Set length to 11; (event fires but it should not since the length is still 5)
  • And +1 (if I could up-vote again) for the links to your blog post, I was wondering what you meant about standard event handling and garbage collection. Thanks too for spotting the flaw in my code! I've edited it to take account of the bug you spotted. – dumbledad Jan 31 '13 at 15:53
  • How would WPF make use if the solution?! we are not implementing INotifyPropertyChanged! I am facing the issue right now. – Talal Yousif Dec 31 '14 at 12:08
6

You could use the technique mentioned in Binding static property and implementing INotifyPropertyChanged but also raise a notification against "length", e.g.

class ExampleClass : INotifyPropertyChanged
{
    private static int _MinimumLength = 5;

    public int MinimumLength
    {
        get
        {
            return _MinimumLength;
        }
        set
        {
            if (_MinimumLength != value)
            {
                _MinimumLength = value;

                OnPropertyChanged("MinimumLength");
                OnPropertyChanged("length");
            }
        }
    }
    ...
}
  • That's clever, thanks Phil. For this to work anything that wanted to set the MinimumLength would need an instance though. I'll have to think that through. – dumbledad Jan 30 '13 at 21:59
  • 4
    The issue here is that it will only notify on the instance for which you set MinimumLength. It won't notify on all of the other instances. – Dan Bryant Jan 30 '13 at 22:04
  • 1
    Good point. Oh well, I can think of messy solutions involving a static dictionary of instances, but let's no go there. – Phil Jan 30 '13 at 22:07
0

i was faced to the same problem. Here is the solution i have put in place.

public class ZoomDataVm : ModelBase
{
    public ZoomDataVm()
    {
        // initialise the zoom
    }

    private double _zoomLevel;
    public double ZoomLevel
    {
        get { return _zoomLevel; }
        set
        {
            if (_zoomLevel != value)
            {
                _zoomLevel = value;
                RaisePropertyChanged(() => ZoomLevel);
                //
                // persist zoom info
            }
        }
    }
}

public class ZoomVm : ModelBase
{
    public static ZoomDataVm _instance;

    static ZoomVm()
    {
        _instance = new ZoomDataVm();
    }

    public ZoomDataVm Instance
    {
        get { return _instance; }
    }
}

Then i use it in the XAML like that

<StackPanel>
    <StackPanel.Resources>
        <screenControls:ZoomVm x:Key="ZoomVm" />
    </StackPanel.Resources>
    <TextBlock Text="{Binding ElementName=uiScaleSliderContainer, Path=Tag}" Foreground="White" Margin="0,0,20,0" />
    <Control Name="uiScaleSliderContainer"
        Margin="0,0,0,0"
        VerticalAlignment="Center"
        HorizontalAlignment="Left"
        Tag="{Binding Source={StaticResource ZoomVm}, Path=Instance.ZoomLevel}">
        <Control.Template>
            <ControlTemplate>
                <Slider Orientation="Horizontal"
                    Width="400"
                    x:Name="uiScaleSlider"
                    ToolTip="Zoom"
                    Value="{Binding ElementName=uiScaleSliderContainer, Path=Tag}"
                    Minimum="0.1"
                    Maximum="2"
                    TickFrequency="0.1"
                    IsSnapToTickEnabled="True">
                </Slider>
            </ControlTemplate>
        </Control.Template>
    </Control>
</StackPanel>

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