10

Consider T = string.

I'm curious if it uses something like: typeof(EqualityComparer<T>).GetInterface("IEqualityComparer<T>");

Any suggestions..

1
  • Why would it say GetInterface to get the System.Type object for the interface it implements itself? How would that be useful? It could just say typeof(IEqualityComparer<T>) if it needed that type somhow, but it doesn't need that. It needs to return an instance of EqualityComparer<T> that we can use. Since the class is abstract, this involves creating an instance of some non-abstract deriving class, and returning that. But maybe you really ask what the returned object behaves like? (At least that was what I answered below.) Jan 31, 2013 at 12:12

2 Answers 2

10

Courtesy of Reflector:

public static EqualityComparer<T> Default
{
    get
    {
        EqualityComparer<T> defaultComparer = EqualityComparer<T>.defaultComparer;
        if (defaultComparer == null)
        {
            defaultComparer = EqualityComparer<T>.CreateComparer();
            EqualityComparer<T>.defaultComparer = defaultComparer;
        }
        return defaultComparer;
    }
}

private static EqualityComparer<T> CreateComparer()
{
    RuntimeType c = (RuntimeType) typeof(T);
    if (c == typeof(byte))
    {
        return (EqualityComparer<T>) new ByteEqualityComparer();
    }
    if (typeof(IEquatable<T>).IsAssignableFrom(c))
    {
        return (EqualityComparer<T>) RuntimeTypeHandle.CreateInstanceForAnotherGenericParameter((RuntimeType) typeof(GenericEqualityComparer<int>), c);
    }
    if (c.IsGenericType && (c.GetGenericTypeDefinition() == typeof(Nullable<>)))
    {
        RuntimeType type2 = (RuntimeType) c.GetGenericArguments()[0];
        if (typeof(IEquatable<>).MakeGenericType(new Type[] { type2 }).IsAssignableFrom(type2))
        {
            return (EqualityComparer<T>) RuntimeTypeHandle.CreateInstanceForAnotherGenericParameter((RuntimeType) typeof(NullableEqualityComparer<int>), type2);
        }
    }
    if (c.IsEnum && (Enum.GetUnderlyingType(c) == typeof(int)))
    {
        return (EqualityComparer<T>) RuntimeTypeHandle.CreateInstanceForAnotherGenericParameter((RuntimeType) typeof(EnumEqualityComparer<int>), c);
    }
    return new ObjectEqualityComparer<T>();
}

So as you can see if T = string it will return GenericEqualityComparer<string>.

1
  • 5
    I don't know if this is helpful. It shows what non-public class is being used behind the scene, but it gives no information on how the non-public GenericEqualityComparer<string> class works. So who cares what the concrete realization of the abstract class is named? Jan 31, 2013 at 11:53
2

EqualityComparer<T>.Default works by calling the virtual methods Equals(object) and GetHashCode() which are defined by System.Object but may or may not be overridden by T.

Note that since the metods are virtual, an implementation of a more derived class than T may be used. For example:

EqualityComparer<object>.Default
  .Equals(new Uri("http://example.com/"), new Uri("http://example.com/"))

will return true, even if

Object.ReferenceEquals(new Uri("http://example.com/"), new Uri("http://example.com/"))

and

(object)new Uri("http://example.com/") == (object)new Uri("http://example.com/")

both return false.

In the case where T is string, the class System.String overloads the two methods in question and use an ordinal comparison. Thus in this case it should be equivalent to System.StringComparer.Ordinal. And of course string is a sealed class, so no other class could derive from string and override Equals and GetHashCode in some strange way.

1
  • 1
    Also - The advantage is that first checks if T implements IEquatable<T> and if so, calls that implementation instead, avoiding the boxing overhead. This is particularly useful in generic methods: static bool Foo<T> (T x, T y) { bool same = EqualityComparer<T>.Default.Equals (x, y);
    – Royi Namir
    Aug 16, 2015 at 7:58

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