8

I am looking for a way to split a string in bash over a delimiter string, and place the parts in an array.

Simple case:

#!/bin/bash
b="aaaaa/bbbbb/ddd/ffffff"
echo "simple string: $b"

IFS='/' b_split=($b)
echo ;
echo "split"
for i in ${b_split[@]}
do
    echo "------ new part ------"
    echo "$i"
done

Gives output

simple string: aaaaa/bbbbb/ddd/ffffff

split
------ new part ------
aaaaa
------ new part ------
bbbbb
------ new part ------
ddd
------ new part ------
ffffff

More complex case:

#!/bin/bash
c=$(echo "AA=A"; echo "B=BB"; echo "======="; echo "C==CC"; echo "DD=D"; echo "======="; echo "EEE"; echo "FF";)
echo "more complex string"
echo "$c";
echo ;
echo "split";

IFS='=======' c_split=($c) ;#    <----    LINE TO BE CHANGED 

for i in ${c_split[@]}
do
    echo "------ new part ------"
    echo "$i"
done

Gives output:

more complex string
AA=A
B=BB
=======
C==CC
DD=D
=======
EEE
FF

split
------ new part ------
AA
------ new part ------
A
B
------ new part ------
BB

------ new part ------

------ new part ------

------ new part ------

------ new part ------

------ new part ------

------ new part ------

------ new part ------

C
------ new part ------

------ new part ------
CC
DD
------ new part ------
D

------ new part ------

------ new part ------

------ new part ------

------ new part ------

------ new part ------

------ new part ------

------ new part ------

EEE
FF

I would like the second output to be like

------ new part ------
AA=A
B=BB
------ new part ------
C==CC
DD=D
------ new part ------
EEE
FF

I.e. to split the string on a sequence of characters, instead of one. How can I do this?

I am looking for an answer that would only modify this line in the second script:

IFS='=======' c_split=($c) ;#    <----    LINE TO BE CHANGED 
  • 1
    If what you are looking for is to tweak IFS to use more than one character as a delimiter, it is not possible. please check this thread for more info: link – Saman Barghi Feb 7 '13 at 18:50
17
+50

IFS disambiguation

IFS mean Input Field Separators, as list of characters that could be used as separators.

By default, this is set to \t\n, meaning that any number (greater than zero) of space, tabulation and/or newline could be one separator.

So the string:

 "    blah  foo=bar 
 baz  "

Leading and trailing separators would be ignored and this string will contain only 3 parts: blah, foo=bar and baz.

Splitting a string using IFS is possible if you know a valid field separator not used in your string.

OIFS="$IFS"
IFS='§'
c=$'AA=A\nB=BB\n=======\nC==CC\nDD=D\n=======\nEEE\nFF'
c_split=(${c//=======/§})
IFS="$OIFS"
printf -- "------ new part ------\n%s\n" "${c_split[@]}"

------ new part ------
AA=A
B=BB

------ new part ------

C==CC
DD=D

------ new part ------

EEE
FF

But this work only while string do not contain §.

You could use another character, like IFS=$'\026';c_split=(${c//=======/$'\026'}) but anyway this may involve furter bugs.

You could browse character maps for finding one who's not in your string:

myIfs=""
for i in {1..255};do
    printf -v char "$(printf "\\\%03o" $i)"
        [ "$c" == "${c#*$char}" ] && myIfs="$char" && break
  done
if ! [ "$myIFS" ] ;then
    echo no split char found, could not do the job, sorry.
    exit 1
  fi

but I find this solution a little overkill.

Splitting on spaces (or without modifying IFS)

Under , we could use this bashism:

b="aaaaa/bbbbb/ddd/ffffff"
b_split=(${b//// })

In fact, this syntaxe ${varname// will initiate a translation (delimited by /) replacing all occurences of / by a space , before assigning it to an array b_split.

Of course, this still use IFS and split array on spaces.

This is not the best way, but could work with specific cases.

You could even drop unwanted spaces before splitting:

b='12 34 / 1 3 5 7 / ab'
b1=${b// }
b_split=(${b1//// })
printf "<%s>, " "${b_split[@]}" ;echo
<12>, <34>, <1>, <3>, <5>, <7>, <ab>, 

or exchange thems...

b1=${b// /§}
b_split=(${b1//// })
printf "<%s>, " "${b_split[@]//§/ }" ;echo
<12 34 >, < 1 3 5 7 >, < ab>, 

Splitting line on strings:

So you have to not use IFS for your meaning, but do have nice features:

#!/bin/bash

c=$'AA=A\nB=BB\n=======\nC==CC\nDD=D\n=======\nEEE\nFF'
echo "more complex string"
echo "$c";
echo ;
echo "split";

mySep='======='
while [ "$c" != "${c#*$mySep}" ];do
    echo "------ new part ------"
    echo "${c%%$mySep*}"
    c="${c#*$mySep}"
  done
echo "------ last part ------"
echo "$c"

Let see:

more complex string
AA=A
B=BB
=======
C==CC
DD=D
=======
EEE
FF

split
------ new part ------
AA=A
B=BB

------ new part ------

C==CC
DD=D

------ last part ------

EEE
FF

Nota: Leading and trailing newlines are not deleted. If this is needed, you could:

mySep=$'\n=======\n'

instead of simply =======.

Or you could rewrite split loop for keeping explicitely this out:

mySep=$'======='
while [ "$c" != "${c#*$mySep}" ];do
    echo "------ new part ------"
    part="${c%%$mySep*}"
    part="${part##$'\n'}"
    echo "${part%%$'\n'}"
    c="${c#*$mySep}"
  done
echo "------ last part ------"
c=${c##$'\n'}
echo "${c%%$'\n'}"

Any case, this match what SO question asked for (: and his sample :)

------ new part ------
AA=A
B=BB
------ new part ------
C==CC
DD=D
------ last part ------
EEE
FF

Finaly creating an array

#!/bin/bash
c=$'AA=A\nB=BB\n=======\nC==CC\nDD=D\n=======\nEEE\nFF'
echo "more complex string"
echo "$c";
echo ;
echo "split";

mySep=$'======='
export -a c_split
while [ "$c" != "${c#*$mySep}" ];do
    part="${c%%$mySep*}"
    part="${part##$'\n'}"
    c_split+=("${part%%$'\n'}")
    c="${c#*$mySep}"
  done
c=${c##$'\n'}
c_split+=("${c%%$'\n'}")

for i in "${c_split[@]}"
do
    echo "------ new part ------"
    echo "$i"
done

Do this finely:

more complex string
AA=A
B=BB
=======
C==CC
DD=D
=======
EEE
FF

split
------ new part ------
AA=A
B=BB
------ new part ------
C==CC
DD=D
------ new part ------
EEE
FF

Some explanations:

  • export -a var to define var as an array and share them in childs
  • ${variablename%string*}, ${variablename%%string*} result in the left part of variablename, upto but without string. One % mean last occurence of string and %% for all occurences. Full variablename is returned is string not found.
  • ${variablename#*string}, do same in reverse way: return last part of variablename from but without string. One # mean first occurence and two ## man all occurences.

Nota in replacement, character * is a joker mean any number of any character.

The command echo "${c%%$'\n'}" would echo variable c but without any number of newline at end of string.

So if variable contain Hello WorldZorGluBHello youZorGluBI'm happy,

variable="Hello WorldZorGluBHello youZorGluBI'm happy"

$ echo ${variable#*ZorGluB}
Hello youZorGlubI'm happy

$ echo ${variable##*ZorGluB}
I'm happy

$ echo ${variable%ZorGluB*}
Hello WorldZorGluBHello you

$ echo ${variable%%ZorGluB*}
Hello World

$ echo ${variable%%ZorGluB}
Hello WorldZorGluBHello youZorGluBI'm happy

$ echo ${variable%happy}
Hello WorldZorGluBHello youZorGluBI'm

$ echo ${variable##* }
happy

All this is explained in the manpage:

$ man -Len -Pless\ +/##word bash

$ man -Len -Pless\ +/%%word bash

$ man -Len -Pless\ +/^\\\ *export\\\ .*word bash

Step by step, the splitting loop:

The separator:

mySep=$'======='

Declaring c_split as an array (and could be shared with childs)

export -a c_split

While variable c do contain at least one occurence of mySep

while [ "$c" != "${c#*$mySep}" ];do

Trunc c from first mySep to end of string and assign to part.

    part="${c%%$mySep*}"

Remove leading newlines

    part="${part##$'\n'}"

Remove trailing newlines and add result as a new array element to c_split.

    c_split+=("${part%%$'\n'}")

Reassing c whith the rest of string when left upto mySep is removed

    c="${c#*$mySep}"

Done ;-)

done

Remove leading newlines

c=${c##$'\n'}

Remove trailing newlines and add result as a new array element to c_split.

c_split+=("${c%%$'\n'}")

Into a function:

ssplit() {
    local string="$1" array=${2:-ssplited_array} delim="${3:- }" pos=0
    while [ "$string" != "${string#*$delim}" ];do
        printf -v $array[pos++] "%s" "${string%%$delim*}"
        string="${string#*$delim}"
      done
    printf -v $array[pos] "%s" "$string"
}

Usage:

ssplit "<quoted string>" [array name] [delimiter string]

where array name is $splitted_array by default and delimiter is one single space.

You could use:

c=$'AA=A\nB=BB\n=======\nC==CC\nDD=D\n=======\nEEE\nFF'
ssplit "$c" c_split $'\n=======\n'
printf -- "--- part ----\n%s\n" "${c_split[@]}"
--- part ----
AA=A
B=BB
--- part ----
C==CC
DD=D
--- part ----
EEE
FF
  • 1
    Thanks for the excelent answer and the detailed explenation. Well done! You dedinitely deserve more upvotes, but I can only give one... :) – user000001 Feb 10 '13 at 17:06
  • I'm trying to use this solution, but my separator is a long line with asterisks (*). I have tried changing the separator for a regular expression, but that doesn't work. Is it possible to do something like: mySep="/\*{50,}/"? – Joudicek Jouda Apr 21 '16 at 9:00
  • Also my string is loaded from a file (multiline): c=`cat /home/pi/test.txt` if that makes a difference. – Joudicek Jouda Apr 21 '16 at 9:10
3

do it with awk:

 awk -vRS='\n=*\n'  '{print "----- new part -----";print}' <<< $c

output:

kent$  awk -vRS='\n=*\n'  '{print "----- new part -----";print}' <<< $c
----- new part -----
AA=A
B=BB
----- new part -----
C==CC
DD=D
----- new part -----
EEE
FF
  • Thanx and +1 for answering. But I can't mark as accepted because (correct me if I am wrong) you process each part in awk but you can't return each part as a separate element in an array. Could you modify? – user000001 Jan 31 '13 at 18:26
  • @user000001 to make it more clear, I added another answer. – Kent Feb 4 '13 at 10:22
  • @user000001 is right saying that there is only a filter not a splitting method: sed $'bb;:a;i----- new part -----\n;1p;d;:b;1ba;/^====*$/ba;' do the same... – F. Hauri Feb 9 '13 at 15:56
1

Following script tested in bash:

kent@7pLaptop:/tmp/test$ bash --version
GNU bash, version 4.2.42(2)-release (i686-pc-linux-gnu)

the script: (named t.sh)

#!/bin/bash

c=$(echo "AA=A"; echo "B=BB"; echo "======="; echo "C==CC"; echo "DD=D"; echo "======="; echo "EEE"; echo "FF";)
echo "more complex string"
echo "$c"
echo "split now"

c_split=($(echo "$c"|awk -vRS="\n=*\n"  '{gsub(/\n/,"\\n");printf $0" "}'))

for i in ${c_split[@]}
do
    echo "---- new part ----"
    echo -e "$i" 
done

output:

kent@7pLaptop:/tmp/test$ ./t.sh 
more complex string
AA=A
B=BB
=======
C==CC
DD=D
=======
EEE
FF
split now
---- new part ----
AA=A
B=BB
---- new part ----
C==CC
DD=D
---- new part ----
EEE
FF

note the echo statement in that for loop, if you remove the option -e you will see:

---- new part ----
AA=A\nB=BB
---- new part ----
C==CC\nDD=D
---- new part ----
EEE\nFF\n

take -e or not depends on your requirement.

  • This breaks if you replace AA=A with AA =A or with AA=\\nA – that other guy Feb 6 '13 at 0:08
  • hugly step by echo -e, as @thatotherguy said, this won't be clean and could have a lot of border effect. – F. Hauri Feb 9 '13 at 15:55
1

Here's an approach that doesn't fumble when the data contains literal backslash sequences, spaces and other:

c=$(echo "AA=A"; echo "B=BB"; echo "======="; echo "C==CC"; echo "DD=D"; echo "======="; echo "EEE"; echo "FF";)
echo "more complex string"
echo "$c";
echo ;
echo "split";

c_split=()
while IFS= read -r -d '' part
do
  c_split+=( "$part" )
done < <(printf "%s" "$c" | sed -e 's/=======/\x00/g')
c_split+=( "$part" )

for i in "${c_split[@]}"
do
    echo "------ new part ------"
    echo "$i"
done

Note that the string is actually split on "=======" as requested, so the line feeds become part of the data (causing extra blank lines when "echo" adds its own).

  • EEE, FF parts lost here. also regarding the line break/line feeds, OP has given the expected output, it is clear. – Kent Feb 6 '13 at 9:36
  • You're right, it was off by one there. – that other guy Feb 6 '13 at 16:38
1

Added some in the example text because of this comment:

This breaks if you replace AA=A with AA =A or with AA=\nA – that other guy

EDIT: I added a suggestion that isn't sensitive for some delimiter in the text. However this isn't using a "one line split" that OP was asking for, but this is how I should have done it if I would do it in bash, and want the result in an array.

script.sh (NEW):

#!/bin/bash

text=$(
  echo "AA=A"; echo "AA =A"; echo "AA=\nA"; echo "B=BB"; echo "=======";
  echo "C==CC"; echo "DD=D"; echo "======="; echo "EEE"; echo "FF";
)
echo "more complex string"
echo "$text"
echo "split now"

c_split[0]=""
current=""
del=""
ind=0

# newline
newl=$'\n'

# Save IFS (not necessary when run as sub shell)
saveIFS="$IFS"
IFS="$newl"
for row in $text; do

  if [[ $row =~ ^=+$ ]]; then
    c_split[$ind]="$current"
    ((ind++))
    current=""
    # Avoid preceding newline
    del=""
    continue
  fi

  current+="$del$row"
  del="$newl"
done

# Restore IFS
IFS="$saveIFS"

# If there is a last poor part of the text
if [[ -n $current ]]; then
  c_split[$ind]="$current"
fi

# The result is an array
for i in "${c_split[@]}"
do
    echo "---- new part ----"
    echo "$i"
done

script.sh (OLD, with "one line split"):
(I stool the idea with awk from @Kent and adjusted it a bit)

#!/bin/bash

c=$(
  echo "AA=A"; echo "AA =A"; echo "AA=\nA"; echo "B=BB"; echo "=======";
  echo "C==CC"; echo "DD=D"; echo "======="; echo "EEE"; echo "FF";
)
echo "more complex string"
echo "$c"
echo "split now"

# Now, this will be almost absolute secure,
# perhaps except a direct hit by lightning.
del=""
for ch in $'\1' $'\2' $'\3' $'\4' $'\5' $'\6' $'\7'; do
  if [ -z "`echo "$c" | grep "$ch"`" ]; then
    del="$ch"
    break
  fi
done

if [ -z "$del" ]; then
  echo "Sorry, all this testing but no delmiter to use..."
  exit 1
fi

IFS="$del" c_split=($(echo "$c" | awk -vRS="\n=+\n" -vORS="$del" '1'))

for i in ${c_split[@]}
do
  echo "---- new part ----"
  echo "$i"
done

Output:

[244an]$ bash --version
GNU bash, version 4.2.24(1)-release (x86_64-pc-linux-gnu)

[244an]$ ./script.sh
more complex string
AA=A
AA =A
AA=\nA
B=BB
=======
C==CC
DD=D
=======
EEE
FF
split now
---- new part ----
AA=A
AA =A
AA=\nA
B=BB
---- new part ----
C==CC
DD=D
---- new part ----
EEE
FF

I'm not using -e for echo, to get AA=\\nA to not do a newline

  • I think you are pretty close. But now it will fail if there is a | in the string :P . Could you think of a way to escape it (without breaking something else)? – user000001 Feb 6 '13 at 19:58
  • I think it doesn't matter what character or sequence you chose, there is always a risk that it will be in "wrong" place. If you want to keep some of the suggestions here and not rewrite it totally a test can be added to be 100% sure. Some code that chose delimiter (| in the above) from a list of characters, finding the first that isn't in the string. Then use that instead of always using |. E.g. characters to use/test: |;,&% etc. – 244an Feb 6 '13 at 20:40
  • Updated the answer, but sooner or later it will be better to write it better in some other language, e.g. ruby. I finally added a better(?) alternative, but that isn't using split in one line (as the OP wants?). – 244an Feb 7 '13 at 11:04
  • You can use \0 as a delimiter, since this isn't allowed in string data anyways (try var=$'foo\0bar'; echo "$var"). This is what my suggested answer does. – that other guy Feb 8 '13 at 18:04
  • Thanks for the tip, but \0 doesn't work, I think IFS needs something apart from NULL character. But I tried with \1 instead, and it seems to work, and good to learn more about $'' syntax, thanks. I will do a last update, but perhaps the OP doesn't have a real problem to solve, it feels more like a quiz. – 244an Feb 8 '13 at 21:03

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