521

How do I check if a variable is an integer in JavaScript, and throw an alert if it isn't? I tried this, but it doesn't work:

<html>
    <head>
        <script type="text/javascript">
            var data = 22;
            alert(NaN(data));
        </script>
    </head>
</html>
4
  • 3
    One posiblity here is to use parseInt.
    – user1945782
    Commented Jan 31, 2013 at 22:50
  • 3
    jsben.ch/#/htLVw - a benchmark for the common ways to do it Commented Oct 24, 2016 at 17:44
  • 3
    All the answers here are really outdated. Today, I recommend sticking to Number.isInteger which is the least hacky way. Commented Feb 25, 2018 at 13:35
  • 4
    @Benjamim what if the number is a string that can be converted to a integer? and in HTML everything is a string.. so Number.isInteger("69") is false
    – joedotnot
    Commented Oct 31, 2018 at 8:19

41 Answers 41

598

That depends, do you also want to cast strings as potential integers as well?

This will do:

function isInt(value) {
  return !isNaN(value) && 
         parseInt(Number(value)) == value && 
         !isNaN(parseInt(value, 10));
}

With Bitwise operations

Simple parse and check

function isInt(value) {
  var x = parseFloat(value);
  return !isNaN(value) && (x | 0) === x;
}

Short-circuiting, and saving a parse operation:

function isInt(value) {
  if (isNaN(value)) {
    return false;
  }
  var x = parseFloat(value);
  return (x | 0) === x;
}

Or perhaps both in one shot:

function isInt(value) {
  return !isNaN(value) && (function(x) { return (x | 0) === x; })(parseFloat(value))
}

Tests:

isInt(42)        // true
isInt("42")      // true
isInt(4e2)       // true
isInt("4e2")     // true
isInt(" 1 ")     // true
isInt("")        // false
isInt("  ")      // false
isInt(42.1)      // false
isInt("1a")      // false
isInt("4e2a")    // false
isInt(null)      // false
isInt(undefined) // false
isInt(NaN)       // false

Here's the fiddle: http://jsfiddle.net/opfyrqwp/28/

Performance

Testing reveals that the short-circuiting solution has the best performance (ops/sec).

// Short-circuiting, and saving a parse operation
function isInt(value) {
  var x;
  if (isNaN(value)) {
    return false;
  }
  x = parseFloat(value);
  return (x | 0) === x;
}

Here is a benchmark: http://jsben.ch/#/htLVw

If you fancy a shorter, obtuse form of short circuiting:

function isInt(value) {
  var x;
  return isNaN(value) ? !1 : (x = parseFloat(value), (0 | x) === x);
}

Of course, I'd suggest letting the minifier take care of that.

18
  • 9
    @krisk - Upvoted for multiple solutions. Also performed a quick test on the 4 variants you provided: jsperf.com/tfm-is-integer - and determined that the short-circuiting solution has the best performance. Commented Jun 1, 2015 at 6:15
  • 3
    It's returning false on 2099999999999999 :-( Commented Jun 26, 2017 at 11:35
  • 1
    @jkucharovic the bitwise OR operator is the culprit. Using the non-bitwise version will return true.
    – krisk
    Commented Jun 26, 2017 at 18:33
  • 2
    This makes '2.' evaluate to true Commented Jun 27, 2017 at 16:19
  • 1
    @cyberwombat well that is a decimal number 2.0 :-) Commented Feb 2, 2018 at 13:10
389

Use the === operator (strict equality) as below,

if (data === parseInt(data, 10))
    alert("data is integer")
else
    alert("data is not an integer")
12
  • 2
    if you run your example through the above code it alerts out a as an integer and the other as not an integer which is the case... in case of NaN also the type of NaN is different from the type of the return value of pareInt().....
    – pranag
    Commented Feb 1, 2013 at 15:21
  • 1
    could you elaborate a bit? the "example" is only demonstrating that using parseInt yields worse performance than using typeof keyword and modulus operator. but I do see what you mean now about (NaN != NaN) Commented Feb 1, 2013 at 22:35
  • 6
    @connorbode in javascript all numbers have the same type (there is no float or double), so 2.0 === 2 since the unnecessary decimal is just a different representation of the same number, thus parseInt(2.0) === 2.0 is equivalent to parseInt(2) === 2 which is true Commented Aug 21, 2014 at 9:38
  • 4
    This is a bad idea. See 2ality.com/2014/05/is-integer.html (1.4). parseInt() coerces to string, for large numbers it won't do what you expect: console.log(1000000000000000000000); => 1e+21. There's plenty of better ways, e.g. const isInteger = val => val%1==0.
    – joerx
    Commented Oct 22, 2016 at 6:30
  • 2
    I'd vote for this answer to be removed altogether. Commented Mar 25, 2021 at 22:30
161

Number.isInteger() seems to be the way to go.

MDN has also provided the following polyfill for browsers not supporting Number.isInteger(), mainly all versions of IE.

Link to MDN page

Number.isInteger = Number.isInteger || function(value) {
    return typeof value === "number" && 
           isFinite(value) && 
           Math.floor(value) === value;
};
11
  • 2
    MDN has the test on 9007199254740992 removed Commented Jul 30, 2015 at 10:43
  • 6
    This is the most straightforward and "correct" answer. I mean, JavaScript already has the method to check for integerhood. No need to write a new one. isNaN() tests for numericity, not integerhood. Commented Jan 29, 2019 at 16:28
  • 4
    @globewalldesk Maybe it answers the question "how to check if a number is integer" but not "if a variable is integer". E.g. a string "1" for example.
    – Onkeltem
    Commented Nov 12, 2020 at 11:52
  • 1
    I find it useful to do Number.isInteger(parseFloat(value)) for form validations. Things magically change from number to string and back sometimes when dealing with forms. Commented Mar 25, 2021 at 22:28
  • 1
    @WalterRoman parseInt('123abc') will become 123, thus invalidating your method.
    – Rodrigo
    Commented Jan 15, 2023 at 0:08
129

Assuming you don't know anything about the variable in question, you should take this approach:

if(typeof data === 'number') {
    var remainder = (data % 1);
    if(remainder === 0) {
        // yes, it is an integer
    }
    else if(isNaN(remainder)) {
        // no, data is either: NaN, Infinity, or -Infinity
    }
    else {
        // no, it is a float (still a number though)
    }
}
else {
    // no way, it is not even a number
}

To put it simply:

if(typeof data==='number' && (data%1)===0) {
    // data is an integer
}
3
  • 8
    What do you mean? This checks for data types in javascript, "1.0" is a string, and is therefore not a number. Otherwise 1 will be the value of a variable if you set it thusly var my_var=1.0;, which is correctly identified by this function as an integer. Commented Feb 6, 2014 at 19:36
  • 5
    Soon, Number.isInteger() will work... until then, this is a good way to do it
    – Claudiu
    Commented Apr 29, 2016 at 20:21
  • Number.isInteger doesn't work for me. I must be doing something wrong. Blake's solution %1 works perfectly.
    – mcmacerson
    Commented Sep 21, 2017 at 15:56
83

You could check if the number has a remainder:

var data = 22;

if(data % 1 === 0){
   // yes it's an integer.
}

Mind you, if your input could also be text and you want to check first it is not, then you can check the type first:

var data = 22;

if(typeof data === 'number'){
     // yes it is numeric

    if(data % 1 === 0){
       // yes it's an integer.
    }
}
0
32

In ES6 2 new methods are added for Number Object.

In it Number.isInteger() method returns true if the argument is an integer, otherwise returns false.

Important Note: The method will also return true for floating point numbers that can be represented as integer. Eg: 5.0 (as it is exactly equal to 5 )

Example usage :

Number.isInteger(0);         // true
Number.isInteger(1);         // true
Number.isInteger(5.0);       // true
Number.isInteger(-100000);   // true
Number.isInteger(99999999999999999999999); // true

Number.isInteger(0.1);       // false
Number.isInteger(Math.PI);   // false

Number.isInteger(NaN);       // false
Number.isInteger(Infinity);  // false
Number.isInteger(-Infinity); // false
Number.isInteger('10');      // false
Number.isInteger(true);      // false
Number.isInteger(false);     // false
Number.isInteger([1]);       // false

Number.isInteger(5.000000000000001); // false
Number.isInteger(5.0000000000000001); // true
3
  • 2
    Note the comment on MDN that "The method will also return true for floating point numbers that can be represented as integer.". It depends on what you need. Commented Jun 24, 2021 at 7:18
  • 2
    5.0 is NOT an integer, i will never use this for testing integers. thank you for pointing this out
    – scavenger
    Commented Nov 12, 2022 at 18:24
  • 2
    it all depend on what you need. if you are checking the age field in a form Number.isInteger('10'); // false is not good.
    – EKanadily
    Commented Nov 25, 2022 at 8:14
31

You can use a simple regular expression:

function isInt(value) {
    var er = /^-?[0-9]+$/;
    return er.test(value);
}
2
  • 1
    This was the one that worked for me because the other ones accept "2.", including Number.isInteger(). I only added a line to remove the leading zeros. Commented Apr 30, 2021 at 18:26
  • @jose-ricardo-citerio-alcala the 2. not exists at all, unless as string (so Number.isInteger will return false) --- you can check it like console.log( ((num)=>{return "is: "+num;})(2.) );
    – a55
    Commented Apr 22 at 11:55
23

First off, NaN is a "number" (yes I know it's weird, just roll with it), and not a "function".

You need to check both if the type of the variable is a number, and to check for integer I would use modulus.

alert(typeof data === 'number' && data%1 == 0);
4
  • 2
    should be: alert(typeof data == 'number' && (data == 0 || data % 1 == 0)); to avoid division by zero.
    – Codebeat
    Commented Jan 31, 2013 at 22:57
  • 22
    @Erwinus 0%1 is still division by 1.
    – Phil
    Commented Jan 31, 2013 at 23:04
  • @Phil, (0 == 0 || 0 % 1 == 0) will evaluate to true.
    – tomekwi
    Commented Nov 25, 2015 at 13:30
  • Oh, by the way 0 % 1 == 0 also evaluates to true! % is not division!
    – tomekwi
    Commented Nov 25, 2015 at 13:31
15

Be careful while using

num % 1

empty string ('') or boolean (true or false) will return as integer. You might not want to do that

false % 1 // true
'' % 1 //true

Number.isInteger(data)

Number.isInteger(22); //true
Number.isInteger(22.2); //false
Number.isInteger('22'); //false

build in function in the browser. Dosnt support older browsers

Alternatives:

Math.round(num)=== num

However, Math.round() also will fail for empty string and boolean

9

To check if integer like poster wants:

if (+data===parseInt(data)) {return true} else {return false}

notice + in front of data (converts string to number), and === for exact.

Here are examples:

data=10
+data===parseInt(data)
true

data="10"
+data===parseInt(data)
true

data="10.2"
+data===parseInt(data)
false
1
  • 7
    This seems like the smartest solution for my case (where I don't mind if it's an integer in a string). However: why not just go return (+data===parseInt(data))? Commented Jul 31, 2014 at 14:22
7

Check if the variable is equal to that same variable rounded to an integer, like this:

if(Math.round(data) != data) {
    alert("Variable is not an integer!");
}
1
  • You can very easily fix this function's issue with returning true for NaN, by simply changing != to !== and inverting the if blocks. This works because NaN is the only value in JavaScript that does not equal itself. For example, the new code should be if (Math.round(x) === x) { /* x IS an integer! */ }
    – mgthomas99
    Commented Dec 4, 2017 at 14:46
6

The simplest and cleanest pre-ECMAScript-6 solution (which is also sufficiently robust to return false even if a non-numeric value such as a string or null is passed to the function) would be the following:

function isInteger(x) { return (x^0) === x; } 

The following solution would also work, although not as elegant as the one above:

function isInteger(x) { return Math.round(x) === x; }

Note that Math.ceil() or Math.floor() could be used equally well (instead of Math.round()) in the above implementation.

Or alternatively:

function isInteger(x) { return (typeof x === 'number') && (x % 1 === 0); }

One fairly common incorrect solution is the following:

function isInteger(x) { return parseInt(x, 10) === x; }

While this parseInt-based approach will work well for many values of x, once x becomes quite large, it will fail to work properly. The problem is that parseInt() coerces its first parameter to a string before parsing digits. Therefore, once the number becomes sufficiently large, its string representation will be presented in exponential form (e.g., 1e+21). Accordingly, parseInt() will then try to parse 1e+21, but will stop parsing when it reaches the e character and will therefore return a value of 1. Observe:

> String(1000000000000000000000)
'1e+21'

> parseInt(1000000000000000000000, 10)
1

> parseInt(1000000000000000000000, 10) === 1000000000000000000000
false
0
6

Why hasnt anyone mentioned Number.isInteger() ?

https://developer.mozilla.org/en-US/docs/Web/JavaScript/Reference/Global_Objects/Number/isInteger

Works perfectly for me and solves the issue with the NaN beginning a number.

3
5
if(Number.isInteger(Number(data))){
    //-----
}
3
5

The Accepted answer not worked for me as i needed to check for int/float and alphabet. so try this at will work for both int/float and alphabet check

function is_int(value){
        if( (parseInt(value) % 1 === 0 )){
            return true;
        }else{
            return false;
        }
}

usage

is_int(44);   // true
is_int("44");   // true
is_int(44.55);  // true
is_int("44.55");  // true
is_int("aaa");  // false  
1
  • is_int("4aaa") would also be true
    – Fluchaa
    Commented Aug 24, 2022 at 12:42
4

ECMA-262 6.0 (ES6) standard include Number.isInteger function.

In order to add support for old browser I highly recommend using strong and community supported solution from:

https://github.com/paulmillr/es6-shim

which is pure ES6 JS polyfills library.

Note that this lib require es5-shim, just follow README.md.

4

Just try this:

let number = 5;
if (Number.isInteger(number)) {
    //do something
}
2
  • Number.isInteger() is not supported in all versions of IE browsers.
    – S K R
    Commented Feb 20, 2020 at 10:31
  • depends... if you care about preservation of Neanderthal Technology or if you want to promote new technologies. If you embrace the future then you would indeed adopt ES6 and do all you can to destroy IE. Like I do, like most do :)
    – scavenger
    Commented Nov 12, 2022 at 18:46
4

What about large integers (bigint)?

Most of these answers fail on large integers (253 and larger): Bitwise tests(e.g. (x | 0) === x), testing typeof x === 'number', regular int functions (e.g. parseInt), regular arithmetics fail on large integers. This can be resolved by using BigInt.

I've compiled several answers into one snippet to show the results. Most outright fail with large integers, while others work, except when passed the type BigInt (e.g. 1n). I've not included duplicate answers and have also left out any answers that allow decimals or don't attempt to test type)

// these all fail
n = 1000000000000000000000000000000
b = 1n

// These all fail on large integers
//https://stackoverflow.com/a/14636652/3600709
console.log('fail',1,n === parseInt(n, 10))
//https://stackoverflow.com/a/14794066/3600709
console.log('fail',2,!isNaN(n) && parseInt(Number(n)) == n && !isNaN(parseInt(n, 10)))
console.log('fail',2,!isNaN(n) && (parseFloat(n) | 0) === parseFloat(n))
console.log('fail',2,!isNaN(n) && (function(x) { return (x | 0) === x; })(parseFloat(n)))
//https://stackoverflow.com/a/21742529/3600709
console.log('fail',3,n == ~~n)
//https://stackoverflow.com/a/28211631/3600709
console.log('fail',4,!isNaN(n) && parseInt(n) == parseFloat(n))
//https://stackoverflow.com/a/41854178/3600709
console.log('fail',5,String(parseInt(n, 10)) === String(n))

// These ones work for integers, but not BigInt types (e.g. 1n)
//https://stackoverflow.com/a/14636725/3600709
console.log('partial',1,typeof n==='number' && (n%1)===0) // this one works
console.log('partial',1,typeof b==='number' && (b%1)===0) // this one fails
//https://stackoverflow.com/a/27424770/3600709
console.log('partial',2,Number.isInteger(n)) // this one works
console.log('partial',2,Number.isInteger(b)) // this one fails
//https://stackoverflow.com/a/14636638/3600709
console.log('partial',3,n % 1 === 0)
console.log('partial',3,b % 1 === 0) // gives uncaught type on BigInt

Checking type

If you actually want to test the incoming value's type to ensure it's an integer, use this instead:

function isInt(value) {
    try {
        BigInt(value)
        return !['string','object','boolean'].includes(typeof value)
    } catch(e) {
        return false
    }
}

function isInt(value) {
    try {
        BigInt(value)
        return !['string','object','boolean'].includes(typeof value)
    } catch(e) {
        return false
    }
}

console.log('--- should be false')
console.log(isInt(undefined))
console.log(isInt(''))
console.log(isInt(null))
console.log(isInt({}))
console.log(isInt([]))
console.log(isInt(1.1e-1))
console.log(isInt(1.1))
console.log(isInt(true))
console.log(isInt(NaN))
console.log(isInt('1'))
console.log(isInt(function(){}))
console.log(isInt(Infinity))

console.log('--- should be true')
console.log(isInt(10))
console.log(isInt(0x11))
console.log(isInt(0))
console.log(isInt(-10000))
console.log(isInt(100000000000000000000000000000000000000))
console.log(isInt(1n))


Without checking type

If you don't care if the incoming type is actually boolean, string, etc. converted into a number, then just use the following:

function isInt(value) {
    try {
        BigInt(value)
        return true
    } catch(e) {
        return false
    }
}

function isInt(value) {
    try {
        BigInt(value)
        return true
    } catch(e) {
        return false
    }
}

console.log('--- should be false')
console.log(isInt(undefined))
console.log(isInt(null))
console.log(isInt({}))
console.log(isInt(1.1e-1))
console.log(isInt(1.1))
console.log(isInt(NaN))
console.log(isInt(function(){}))
console.log(isInt(Infinity))

console.log('--- should be true')
console.log(isInt(10))
console.log(isInt(0x11))
console.log(isInt(0))
console.log(isInt(-10000))
console.log(isInt(100000000000000000000000000000000000000))
console.log(isInt(1n))
// gets converted to number
console.log(isInt(''))
console.log(isInt([]))
console.log(isInt(true))
console.log(isInt('1'))

3

You could use this function:

function isInteger(value) {
    return (value == parseInt(value));
}

It will return true even if the value is a string containing an integer value.
So, the results will be:

alert(isInteger(1)); // true
alert(isInteger(1.2)); // false
alert(isInteger("1")); // true
alert(isInteger("1.2")); // false
alert(isInteger("abc")); // false
3

Use the | operator:

(5.3 | 0) === 5.3 // => false
(5.0 | 0) === 5.0 // => true

So, a test function might look like this:

var isInteger = function (value) {
  if (typeof value !== 'number') {
    return false;
  }

  if ((value | 0) !== value) {
    return false;
  }

  return true;
};
3

Number.isInteger() is the best way if your browser support it, if not, I think there are so many ways to go:

function isInt1(value){
  return (value^0) === value
}

or:

function isInt2(value){
  return (typeof value === 'number') && (value % 1 === 0); 
}

or:

function isInt3(value){
  return parseInt(value, 10) === value; 
}

or:

function isInt4(value){
  return Math.round(value) === value; 
}

now we can test the results:

var value = 1
isInt1(value)   // return true
isInt2(value)   // return true
isInt3(value)   // return true
isInt4(value)   // return true

var value = 1.1
isInt1(value)   // return false
isInt2(value)   // return false
isInt3(value)   // return false
isInt4(value)   // return false

var value = 1000000000000000000
isInt1(value)   // return false
isInt2(value)   // return true
isInt3(value)   // return false
isInt4(value)   // return true

var value = undefined
isInt1(value)   // return false
isInt2(value)   // return false
isInt3(value)   // return false
isInt4(value)   // return false

var value = '1' //number as string
isInt1(value)   // return false
isInt2(value)   // return false
isInt3(value)   // return false
isInt4(value)   // return false

So, all of these methods are works, but when the number is very big, parseInt and ^ operator would not works well.

1
  • Having the following test let possibleDataTypes = ['string', '20', '20.000','20.0001', [], {}, new Number(5), NaN, null, undefined, Infinity, -Infinity, true, false, 20, -20, 200000000, 20.000000, 20.000001 , Math.PI, 100000000000000000000, 1 + 1e-16]; let polyFillFunctions = [isInt1, isInt2, isInt3, isInt4, Number.isInteger]; possibleDataTypes.map((dataType) =>{console.log(polyFillFunctions.map((functionName) => functionName(dataType))) }); display the possible data types' output in a compact side-by-side pseudo-tabular format. Inconsistent results arose.
    – xquilt
    Commented Sep 1, 2022 at 9:25
3

You could tryNumber.isInteger(Number(value)) if value might be an integer in string form e.g var value = "23" and you want this to evaluate to true. Avoid trying Number.isInteger(parseInt(value)) because this won't always return the correct value. e.g if var value = "23abc" and you use the parseInt implementation, it would still return true.

But if you want strictly integer values then probably Number.isInteger(value) should do the trick.

1
  • 1
    Note that this is not supported by IE; as stated here in the docu I got my scrip halted because of this especially if the var you are checking is undefined Commented Jul 12, 2017 at 14:55
3
var x = 1.5;
if(!isNaN(x)){
 console.log('Number');
 if(x % 1 == 0){
   console.log('Integer');
 }
}else {
 console.log('not a number');
}
1
  • 4
    After 29 answers, one would expect a bit more of explanations to make your answer stand out...
    – brasofilo
    Commented Jun 9, 2017 at 17:31
3

The 'accepted' answer is wrong (as some comments below point out). this modification can make it work:

if (data.toString() === parseInt(data, 10).toString())
    alert("data is a valid integer")
else
    alert("data is not a valid integer")
3

My approach:

a >= 1e+21 → Only pass for very large numbers. This will cover all cases for sure, unlike other solutions which has been provided in this discussion.

a === (a|0) → if the given function's argument is exactly the same (===) as the bitwise-transformed value, it means that the argument is an integer.

a|0 → return 0 for any value of a that isn't a number, and if a is indeed a number, it will strip away anything after the decimal point, so 1.0001 will become 1

const isInteger = n => n >= 1e+21 ? true : n === (n|0);

// tests:
[
  [1,                         true],
  [1000000000000000000000,    true],
  [4e2,                       true],
  [Infinity,                  true],
  [1.0,                       true],
  [1.0000000000001,           false],
  [0.1,                       false],
  ["0",                       false],
  ["1",                       false],
  ["1.1",                     false],
  [NaN,                       false],
  [[],                        false],
  [{},                        false],
  [true,                      false],
  [false,                     false],
  [null,                      false],
  [undefined,                 false],
].forEach(([test, expected]) => 
  console.log(
    isInteger(test) === expected, 
    typeof test, 
    test
   ) 
)

3
  • 1
    Good idea! I also like that you showed your tests but unfortunately this does not consider a String value of "0".
    – Jammer
    Commented Nov 12, 2018 at 13:08
  • Hey @vsync, Not intentionally. I did originally upvote but decided to revert it back due to my previous comment. I must have accidentally double clicked it or something.
    – Jammer
    Commented Nov 13, 2018 at 1:54
  • 1.0 is a float, not an integer
    – scavenger
    Commented Nov 12, 2022 at 18:40
2

Besides, Number.isInteger(). Maybe Number.isSafeInteger() is another option here by using the ES6-specified.

To polyfill Number.isSafeInteger(..) in pre-ES6 browsers:

Number.isSafeInteger = Number.isSafeInteger || function(num) {
    return typeof num === "number" && 
           isFinite(num) && 
           Math.floor(num) === num &&
           Math.abs( num ) <= Number.MAX_SAFE_INTEGER;
};
2

you can also try it this way

var data = 22;
if (Number.isInteger(data)) {
    console.log("integer");
 }else{
     console.log("not an integer");
 }

or

if (data === parseInt(data, 10)){
    console.log("integer");
}else{
    console.log("not an integer");
}
1
  • This will produce the wrong result for data=22.5;. Also both branches have console.log("not an integer") ::S
    – Axiom255
    Commented Oct 28, 2018 at 5:19
1

You can use regexp for this:

function isInteger(n) {
    return (typeof n == 'number' && /^-?\d+$/.test(n+''));
}
1

From http://www.toptal.com/javascript/interview-questions:

function isInteger(x) { return (x^0) === x; } 

Found it to be the best way to do this.

1
1
function isInteger(argument) { return argument == ~~argument; }

Usage:

isInteger(1);     // true<br>
isInteger(0.1);   // false<br>
isInteger("1");   // true<br>
isInteger("0.1"); // false<br>

or:

function isInteger(argument) { return argument == argument + 0 && argument == ~~argument; }

Usage:

isInteger(1);     // true<br>
isInteger(0.1);   // false<br>
isInteger("1");   // false<br>
isInteger("0.1"); // false<br>
1
  • 1
    interesting, only work for small integer,failed on big Int. isInteger(9000000000) returns false. the reason is bitwise operators treat numbers as if they were 32-bit signed integers.
    – anru
    Commented Jun 22, 2015 at 9:53

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