How do I check if a variable is an integer in JavaScript, and throw an alert if it isn't? I tried this, but it doesn't work:

<html>
    <head>
        <script type="text/javascript">
            var data = 22;
            alert(NaN(data));
        </script>
    </head>
</html>
  • 2
    One posiblity here is to use parseInt. – Paul Jan 31 '13 at 22:50
  • 2
    jsben.ch/#/htLVw - a benchmark for the common ways to do it – EscapeNetscape Oct 24 '16 at 17:44
  • All the answers here are really outdated. Today, I recommend sticking to Number.isInteger which is the least hacky way. – Benjamin Gruenbaum Feb 25 at 13:35
  • @Benjamim what if the number is a string that can be converted to a integer? and in HTML everything is a string.. so Number.isInteger("69") is false – joedotnot Oct 31 at 8:19

35 Answers 35

up vote 293 down vote accepted

Use the === operator (strict equality) as below,

if (data === parseInt(data, 10))
    alert("data is integer")
else
    alert("data is not an integer")
  • 76
    this counts NaN as an integer. also performs worse against my method. jsperf.com/numbers-and-integers – Blake Regalia Jan 31 '13 at 23:54
  • 2
    if you run your example through the above code it alerts out a as an integer and the other as not an integer which is the case... in case of NaN also the type of NaN is different from the type of the return value of pareInt()..... – pranag Feb 1 '13 at 15:21
  • 1
    could you elaborate a bit? the "example" is only demonstrating that using parseInt yields worse performance than using typeof keyword and modulus operator. but I do see what you mean now about (NaN != NaN) – Blake Regalia Feb 1 '13 at 22:35
  • 4
    @connorbode in javascript all numbers have the same type (there is no float or double), so 2.0 === 2 since the unnecessary decimal is just a different representation of the same number, thus parseInt(2.0) === 2.0 is equivalent to parseInt(2) === 2 which is true – Michael Theriot Aug 21 '14 at 9:38
  • 6
    Using: (Number(a)===parseInt(a)) because they catch each other's exceptions... – Quadrivium Oct 6 '14 at 18:53

That depends, do you also want to cast strings as potential integers as well?

This will do:

function isInt(value) {
  return !isNaN(value) && 
         parseInt(Number(value)) == value && 
         !isNaN(parseInt(value, 10));
}

With Bitwise operations

Simple parse and check

function isInt(value) {
  var x = parseFloat(value);
  return !isNaN(value) && (x | 0) === x;
}

Short-circuiting, and saving a parse operation:

function isInt(value) {
  if (isNaN(value)) {
    return false;
  }
  var x = parseFloat(value);
  return (x | 0) === x;
}

Or perhaps both in one shot:

function isInt(value) {
  return !isNaN(value) && (function(x) { return (x | 0) === x; })(parseFloat(value))
}

Tests:

isInt(42)        // true
isInt("42")      // true
isInt(4e2)       // true
isInt("4e2")     // true
isInt(" 1 ")     // true
isInt("")        // false
isInt("  ")      // false
isInt(42.1)      // false
isInt("1a")      // false
isInt("4e2a")    // false
isInt(null)      // false
isInt(undefined) // false
isInt(NaN)       // false

Here's the fiddle: http://jsfiddle.net/opfyrqwp/28/

Performance

Testing reveals that the short-circuiting solution has the best performance (ops/sec).

// Short-circuiting, and saving a parse operation
function isInt(value) {
  var x;
  if (isNaN(value)) {
    return false;
  }
  x = parseFloat(value);
  return (x | 0) === x;
}

Here is a benchmark: http://jsben.ch/#/htLVw

If you fancy a shorter, obtuse form of short circuiting:

function isInt(value) {
  var x;
  return isNaN(value) ? !1 : (x = parseFloat(value), (0 | x) === x);
}

Of course, I'd suggest letting the minifier take care of that.

  • 3
    @krisk - Upvoted for multiple solutions. Also performed a quick test on the 4 variants you provided: jsperf.com/tfm-is-integer - and determined that the short-circuiting solution has the best performance. – tfmontague Jun 1 '15 at 6:15
  • 1
    It's returning false on 2099999999999999 :-( – jkucharovic Jun 26 '17 at 11:35
  • 1
    @jkucharovic the bitwise OR operator is the culprit. Using the non-bitwise version will return true. – krisk Jun 26 '17 at 18:33
  • 1
    This makes '2.' evaluate to true – cyberwombat Jun 27 '17 at 16:19
  • 1
    @cyberwombat well that is a decimal number 2.0 :-) – Kuba Beránek Feb 2 at 13:10

Assuming you don't know anything about the variable in question, you should take this approach:

if(typeof data === 'number') {
    var remainder = (data % 1);
    if(remainder === 0) {
        // yes, it is an integer
    }
    else if(isNaN(remainder)) {
        // no, data is either: NaN, Infinity, or -Infinity
    }
    else {
        // no, it is a float (still a number though)
    }
}
else {
    // no way, it is not even a number
}

To put it simply:

if(typeof data==='number' && (data%1)===0) {
    // data is an integer
}
  • 1
    this will not work for 1.0 – Radha Mohan Maheshwari Feb 6 '14 at 11:19
  • 5
    What do you mean? This checks for data types in javascript, "1.0" is a string, and is therefore not a number. Otherwise 1 will be the value of a variable if you set it thusly var my_var=1.0;, which is correctly identified by this function as an integer. – Blake Regalia Feb 6 '14 at 19:36
  • 4
    Soon, Number.isInteger() will work... until then, this is a good way to do it – Claudiu Apr 29 '16 at 20:21
  • Number.isInteger doesn't work for me. I must be doing something wrong. Blake's solution %1 works perfectly. – mcmacerson Sep 21 '17 at 15:56

Number.isInteger() seems to be the way to go.

MDN has also provided the following polyfill for browsers not supporting Number.isInteger(), mainly all versions of IE.

Link to MDN page

Number.isInteger = Number.isInteger || function(value) {
    return typeof value === "number" && 
           isFinite(value) && 
           Math.floor(value) === value;
};

You could check if the number has a remainder:

var data = 22;

if(data % 1 === 0){
   // yes it's an integer.
}

Mind you, if your input could also be text and you want to check first it is not, then you can check the type first:

var data = 22;

if(typeof data === 'number'){
     // yes it is numeric

    if(data % 1 === 0){
       // yes it's an integer.
    }
}
  • Of yes, if it is zero you will get an division by zero error – Codebeat Jan 31 '13 at 22:54
  • 3
    @Erwinus: Run 0 % 1 === 0 in the console. It returns true as 0 % 1 returns 0. – Nope Jan 31 '13 at 22:55
  • Have you try it in IE ;-) – Codebeat Jan 31 '13 at 22:58
  • 1
    @Erwinus: 0 % 1 returns 0 in IE9, IE8 and IE7 compatibility mode. – Nope Jan 31 '13 at 23:00
  • 58
    @Erwinus: I think you got your facts mixed up. A division by zero error is caused when you divide by zero not when you divide zero by a number. Nothing to do with the version of IE at all. – Nope Jan 31 '13 at 23:06

You can use a simple regular expression:

function isInt(value) {
    var er = /^-?[0-9]+$/;
    return er.test(value);
}

First off, NaN is a "number" (yes I know it's weird, just roll with it), and not a "function".

You need to check both if the type of the variable is a number, and to check for integer I would use modulus.

alert(typeof data === 'number' && data%1 == 0);
  • 2
    should be: alert(typeof data == 'number' && (data == 0 || data % 1 == 0)); to avoid division by zero. – Codebeat Jan 31 '13 at 22:57
  • 19
    @Erwinus 0%1 is still division by 1. – Phil Jan 31 '13 at 23:04
  • @Phil, (0 == 0 || 0 % 1 == 0) will evaluate to true. – tomekwi Nov 25 '15 at 13:30
  • Oh, by the way 0 % 1 == 0 also evaluates to true! % is not division! – tomekwi Nov 25 '15 at 13:31

Be careful while using

num % 1

empty string ('') or boolean (true or false) will return as integer. You might not want to do that

false % 1 // true
'' % 1 //true

Number.isInteger(data)

Number.isInteger(22); //true
Number.isInteger(22.2); //false
Number.isInteger('22'); //false

build in function in the browser. Dosnt support older browsers

Alternatives:

Math.round(num)=== num

However, Math.round() also will fail for empty string and boolean

To check if integer like poster wants:

if (+data===parseInt(data)) {return true} else {return false}

notice + in front of data (converts string to number), and === for exact.

Here are examples:

data=10
+data===parseInt(data)
true

data="10"
+data===parseInt(data)
true

data="10.2"
+data===parseInt(data)
false
  • 6
    This seems like the smartest solution for my case (where I don't mind if it's an integer in a string). However: why not just go return (+data===parseInt(data))? – Swiss Mister Jul 31 '14 at 14:22
if(Number.isInteger(Number(data))){
    //-----
}

The simplest and cleanest pre-ECMAScript-6 solution (which is also sufficiently robust to return false even if a non-numeric value such as a string or null is passed to the function) would be the following:

function isInteger(x) { return (x^0) === x; } 

The following solution would also work, although not as elegant as the one above:

function isInteger(x) { return Math.round(x) === x; }

Note that Math.ceil() or Math.floor() could be used equally well (instead of Math.round()) in the above implementation.

Or alternatively:

function isInteger(x) { return (typeof x === 'number') && (x % 1 === 0); }

One fairly common incorrect solution is the following:

function isInteger(x) { return parseInt(x, 10) === x; }

While this parseInt-based approach will work well for many values of x, once x becomes quite large, it will fail to work properly. The problem is that parseInt() coerces its first parameter to a string before parsing digits. Therefore, once the number becomes sufficiently large, its string representation will be presented in exponential form (e.g., 1e+21). Accordingly, parseInt() will then try to parse 1e+21, but will stop parsing when it reaches the e character and will therefore return a value of 1. Observe:

> String(1000000000000000000000)
'1e+21'

> parseInt(1000000000000000000000, 10)
1

> parseInt(1000000000000000000000, 10) === 1000000000000000000000
false

ECMA-262 6.0 (ES6) standard include Number.isInteger function.

In order to add support for old browser I highly recommend using strong and community supported solution from:

https://github.com/paulmillr/es6-shim

which is pure ES6 JS polyfills library.

Note that this lib require es5-shim, just follow README.md.

You could tryNumber.isInteger(Number(value)) if value might be an integer in string form e.g var value = "23" and you want this to evaluate to true. Avoid trying Number.isInteger(parseInt(value)) because this won't always return the correct value. e.g if var value = "23abc" and you use the parseInt implementation, it would still return true.

But if you want strictly integer values then probably Number.isInteger(value) should do the trick.

  • 1
    Note that this is not supported by IE; as stated here in the docu I got my scrip halted because of this especially if the var you are checking is undefined – mikewasmike Jul 12 '17 at 14:55

Why hasnt anyone mentioned Number.isInteger() ?

https://developer.mozilla.org/en-US/docs/Web/JavaScript/Reference/Global_Objects/Number/isInteger

Works perfectly for me and solves the issue with the NaN beginning a number.

Check if the variable is equal to that same variable rounded to an integer, like this:

if(Math.round(data) != data) {
    alert("Variable is not an integer!");
}
  • 3
    Problem with this one is that it works with NaN as a value – marksyzm Apr 2 '14 at 9:00
  • You can very easily fix this function's issue with returning true for NaN, by simply changing != to !== and inverting the if blocks. This works because NaN is the only value in JavaScript that does not equal itself. For example, the new code should be if (Math.round(x) === x) { /* x IS an integer! */ } – mgthomas99 Dec 4 '17 at 14:46

Number.isInteger() is the best way if your browser support it, if not, I think there are so many ways to go:

function isInt1(value){
  return (value^0) === value
}

or:

function isInt2(value){
  return (typeof value === 'number') && (value % 1 === 0); 
}

or:

function isInt3(value){
  return parseInt(value, 10) === value; 
}

or:

function isInt4(value){
  return Math.round(value) === value; 
}

now we can test the results:

var value = 1
isInt1(value)   // return true
isInt2(value)   // return true
isInt3(value)   // return true
isInt4(value)   // return true

var value = 1.1
isInt1(value)   // return false
isInt2(value)   // return false
isInt3(value)   // return false
isInt4(value)   // return false

var value = 1000000000000000000
isInt1(value)   // return false
isInt2(value)   // return true
isInt3(value)   // return false
isInt4(value)   // return true

var value = undefined
isInt1(value)   // return false
isInt2(value)   // return false
isInt3(value)   // return false
isInt4(value)   // return false

var value = '1' //number as string
isInt1(value)   // return false
isInt2(value)   // return false
isInt3(value)   // return false
isInt4(value)   // return false

So, all of these methods are works, but when the number is very big, parseInt and ^ operator would not works well.

You could use this function:

function isInteger(value) {
    return (value == parseInt(value));
}

It will return true even if the value is a string containing an integer value.
So, the results will be:

alert(isInteger(1)); // true
alert(isInteger(1.2)); // false
alert(isInteger("1")); // true
alert(isInteger("1.2")); // false
alert(isInteger("abc")); // false

Besides, Number.isInteger(). Maybe Number.isSafeInteger() is another option here by using the ES6-specified.

To polyfill Number.isSafeInteger(..) in pre-ES6 browsers:

Number.isSafeInteger = Number.isSafeInteger || function(num) {
    return typeof num === "number" && 
           isFinite(num) && 
           Math.floor(num) === num &&
           Math.abs( num ) <= Number.MAX_SAFE_INTEGER;
};
var x = 1.5;
if(!isNaN(x)){
 console.log('Number');
 if(x % 1 == 0){
   console.log('Integer');
 }
}else {
 console.log('not a number');
}
  • 3
    After 29 answers, one would expect a bit more of explanations to make your answer stand out... – brasofilo Jun 9 '17 at 17:31

You can use regexp for this:

function isInteger(n) {
    return (typeof n == 'number' && /^-?\d+$/.test(n+''));
}

From http://www.toptal.com/javascript/interview-questions:

function isInteger(x) { return (x^0) === x; } 

Found it to be the best way to do this.

Use the | operator:

(5.3 | 0) === 5.3 // => false
(5.0 | 0) === 5.0 // => true

So, a test function might look like this:

var isInteger = function (value) {
  if (typeof value !== 'number') {
    return false;
  }

  if ((value | 0) !== value) {
    return false;
  }

  return true;
};

This will solve one more scenario (121.), a dot at end

function isInt(value) {
        var ind = value.indexOf(".");
        if (ind > -1) { return false; }

        if (isNaN(value)) {
            return false;
        }

        var x = parseFloat(value);
        return (x | 0) === x;

    }

For positive integer values without separators:

return ( data !== '' && data === data.replace(/\D/, '') );

Tests 1. if not empty and 2. if value is equal to the result of a replace of a non-digit char in its value.

Ok got minus, cause didn't describe my example, so more examples:):

I use regular expression and test method:

var isInteger = /^[0-9]\d*$/;

isInteger.test(123); //true
isInteger.test('123'); // true
isInteger.test('sdf'); //false
isInteger.test('123sdf'); //false

// If u want to avoid string value:
typeof testVal !== 'string' && isInteger.test(testValue);
  • Got minus probably because test is not a function. – imlokesh Dec 24 '17 at 19:05
  • @imlokesh what do you mean "is not a function"? oO I wrote i use "test method". – Vasyl Gutnyk Dec 26 '17 at 16:28
  • 1
    my bad... this works well... – imlokesh Dec 26 '17 at 16:30
  • @imlokesh no problem, i just ask U cause i used it in production:) and i thought u found some bug:) – Vasyl Gutnyk Dec 26 '17 at 16:37

I had to check if a variable (string or number) is an integer and I used this condition:

function isInt(a){
    return !isNaN(a) && parseInt(a) == parseFloat(a);
}

http://jsfiddle.net/e267369d/1/

Some of the other answers have a similar solution (rely on parseFloat combined with isNaN), but mine should be more straight forward and self explaining.


Edit: I found out that my method fails for strings containing comma (like "1,2") and I also realized that in my particular case I want the function to fail if a string is not a valid integer (should fail on any float, even 1.0). So here is my function Mk II:

function isInt(a){
    return !isNaN(a) && parseInt(a) == parseFloat(a) && (typeof a != 'string' || (a.indexOf('.') == -1 && a.indexOf(',') == -1));
}

http://jsfiddle.net/e267369d/3/

Of course in case you actually need the function to accept integer floats (1.0 stuff), you can always remove the dot condition a.indexOf('.') == -1.

function isInteger(argument) { return argument == ~~argument; }

Usage:

isInteger(1);     // true<br>
isInteger(0.1);   // false<br>
isInteger("1");   // true<br>
isInteger("0.1"); // false<br>

or:

function isInteger(argument) { return argument == argument + 0 && argument == ~~argument; }

Usage:

isInteger(1);     // true<br>
isInteger(0.1);   // false<br>
isInteger("1");   // false<br>
isInteger("0.1"); // false<br>
  • 1
    interesting, only work for small integer,failed on big Int. isInteger(9000000000) returns false. the reason is bitwise operators treat numbers as if they were 32-bit signed integers. – anru Jun 22 '15 at 9:53

Lodash https://lodash.com/docs#isInteger (since 4.0.0) has function to check if variable is an integer:

_.isInteger(3);
// → true

_.isInteger(Number.MIN_VALUE);
// → false

_.isInteger(Infinity);
// → false

_.isInteger('3');
// → false
  • 1
    Apparently, this is just for version 4.0 and above ... – Manuel Rivera Apr 1 '16 at 14:13
  • Manuel: That is true I'll add it to the anwser, thanks! – Mikael Lepistö Apr 4 '16 at 6:12

After few successes and failures, I came up with this solution:

const isInt = (value) => {
  return String(parseInt(value, 10)) === String(value)
}

I liked the idea above of checking the value for not being NaN and use parseFloat, but when I tried it in React infrastructure it didn't work for some reason.

Edit: I found a nicer way without using strings:

var isInt = function (str) {
  return str === '0' || !!~~str;
}

I think it's the shortest answer. Maybe even the most efficient, but I could be stand corrected. :)

This solution will work for all browsers.
1. Convert your number to string e.g. 123 => String(123)
2. Check if there is any .(dot) available in given string or not by using indexOf function of string.

"123".indexOf(".") => -1 // integer
"123.1".indexOf(".") => 3 // not integer

OR

Use below function

function isInt(val) {
    return String(val).indexOf('.') === -1;
}

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