17

I want to pass all the files as a single argument on Linux but I am not able to do that.

This is working

ls | sort -n | xargs  -i pdftk  {} cat output combinewd2.pdf

This passes a single argument per command, but I want all in one command.

17

This is one way to do it

pdftk $(ls | sort -n) cat output combinewd2.pdf

or using backtick

pdftk `ls | sort -n` cat output combinewd2.pdf

As pointed out in the comments this will not work on filenames containing spaces. In that case you could use eval

eval pdftk $(while IFS= read -r file; do
    echo \"$file\"
done < <(ls | sort -n)) cat output combinewd2.pdf

Suppose there are two files named " 0 foo " and " 1 bar " then the result of eval would be the desired command, with the file names in double quotes:

pdftk " 0 foo " " 1 bar " cat output combinewd2.pdf

If the filenames might contain newlines, then use find command, see discussion by @joeytwiddle in the comments of @andrewdotn's answer. The following solution also handles file names with double quotes using the sed command to escape double quotes:

eval pdftk $(while IFS= read -r -d '' file; do
    echo \"$file\"
done < <(find . -maxdepth 1 -type f -print0 | \
    sed 's/"/\\"/g'| sort -zn)) cat output combinewd2.pdf
  • 2
    A very bash-centric answer, but cool nonetheless. This won't work in csh/tcsh, however. (all comments about shell choice > /dev/null) – radical7 Feb 1 '13 at 4:45
  • Crucially, this will not work on filenames containing spaces. The words will be broken into separate arguments. – joeytwiddle Feb 24 '16 at 9:08
  • @joeytwiddle you are correct, I propose a solution using eval – amdn Feb 24 '16 at 17:51
  • @joeytwiddle right again, added sed command to escape double quotes – amdn Feb 24 '16 at 20:22
  • 1
    I fear your eval solution won't work on filenames containing " quotation marks ". I do like the simplicity of your $(...) approach for times when we know the filenames are free of whitespace. I've posted my solution as a separate answer. – joeytwiddle Feb 24 '16 at 20:22
23

Use -I option:

echo prefix | xargs -I % echo % post

Output:

prefix post
  • 5
    However, this doesn't work as desired (it calls the command three times, rather than once with three arguments) if you use ls rather than echo as the input, which is what the OP is trying to do... – DNA Aug 14 '17 at 12:37
10

It’s ugly, but you can run sh -c and access the list of arguments passed by xargs as "${@}", like so:

ls | sort -n | xargs -d'\n' sh -c 'pdftk "${@}" cat output combinewd2.pdf' "${0}"

The extra "${0}" at the end is there because, as the sh man page says

-c string

If the -c option is present, then commands are read from string. If there are arguments after the string, they are assigned to the positional parameters, starting with $0.

To test this, let’s first create some files with complicated names that will mess up most other solutions:

$ seq 1 100 | xargs -I{} touch '{} with "spaces"'
$ ls
1 with "spaces"    31 with "spaces"  54 with "spaces"  77 with "spaces"
10 with "spaces"   32 with "spaces"  55 with "spaces"  78 with "spaces"
100 with "spaces"  33 with "spaces"  56 with "spaces"  79 with "spaces"
11 with "spaces"   34 with "spaces"  57 with "spaces"  8 with "spaces"
12 with "spaces"   35 with "spaces"  58 with "spaces"  80 with "spaces"
13 with "spaces"   36 with "spaces"  59 with "spaces"  81 with "spaces"
14 with "spaces"   37 with "spaces"  6 with "spaces"   82 with "spaces"
15 with "spaces"   38 with "spaces"  60 with "spaces"  83 with "spaces"
16 with "spaces"   39 with "spaces"  61 with "spaces"  84 with "spaces"
17 with "spaces"   4 with "spaces"   62 with "spaces"  85 with "spaces"
18 with "spaces"   40 with "spaces"  63 with "spaces"  86 with "spaces"
19 with "spaces"   41 with "spaces"  64 with "spaces"  87 with "spaces"
2 with "spaces"    42 with "spaces"  65 with "spaces"  88 with "spaces"
20 with "spaces"   43 with "spaces"  66 with "spaces"  89 with "spaces"
21 with "spaces"   44 with "spaces"  67 with "spaces"  9 with "spaces"
22 with "spaces"   45 with "spaces"  68 with "spaces"  90 with "spaces"
23 with "spaces"   46 with "spaces"  69 with "spaces"  91 with "spaces"
24 with "spaces"   47 with "spaces"  7 with "spaces"   92 with "spaces"
25 with "spaces"   48 with "spaces"  70 with "spaces"  93 with "spaces"
26 with "spaces"   49 with "spaces"  71 with "spaces"  94 with "spaces"
27 with "spaces"   5 with "spaces"   72 with "spaces"  95 with "spaces"
28 with "spaces"   50 with "spaces"  73 with "spaces"  96 with "spaces"
29 with "spaces"   51 with "spaces"  74 with "spaces"  97 with "spaces"
3 with "spaces"    52 with "spaces"  75 with "spaces"  98 with "spaces"
30 with "spaces"   53 with "spaces"  76 with "spaces"  99 with "spaces"
$  ls | sort -n | xargs -d'\n' sh -c 'set -x; pdftk "${@}" cat output combinewd2.pdf' "${0}"
+ pdftk '1 with "spaces"' '2 with "spaces"' '3 with "spaces"' '4 with "spaces"' '5 with "spaces"' '6 with "spaces"' '7 with "spaces"' '8 with "spaces"' '9 with "spaces"' '10 with "spaces"' '11 with "spaces"' '12 with "spaces"' '13 with "spaces"' '14 with "spaces"' '15 with "spaces"' '16 with "spaces"' '17 with "spaces"' '18 with "spaces"' '19 with "spaces"' '20 with "spaces"' '21 with "spaces"' '22 with "spaces"' '23 with "spaces"' '24 with "spaces"' '25 with "spaces"' '26 with "spaces"' '27 with "spaces"' '28 with "spaces"' '29 with "spaces"' '30 with "spaces"' '31 with "spaces"' '32 with "spaces"' '33 with "spaces"' '34 with "spaces"' '35 with "spaces"' '36 with "spaces"' '37 with "spaces"' '38 with "spaces"' '39 with "spaces"' '40 with "spaces"' '41 with "spaces"' '42 with "spaces"' '43 with "spaces"' '44 with "spaces"' '45 with "spaces"' '46 with "spaces"' '47 with "spaces"' '48 with "spaces"' '49 with "spaces"' '50 with "spaces"' '51 with "spaces"' '52 with "spaces"' '53 with "spaces"' '54 with "spaces"' '55 with "spaces"' '56 with "spaces"' '57 with "spaces"' '58 with "spaces"' '59 with "spaces"' '60 with "spaces"' '61 with "spaces"' '62 with "spaces"' '63 with "spaces"' '64 with "spaces"' '65 with "spaces"' '66 with "spaces"' '67 with "spaces"' '68 with "spaces"' '69 with "spaces"' '70 with "spaces"' '71 with "spaces"' '72 with "spaces"' '73 with "spaces"' '74 with "spaces"' '75 with "spaces"' '76 with "spaces"' '77 with "spaces"' '78 with "spaces"' '79 with "spaces"' '80 with "spaces"' '81 with "spaces"' '82 with "spaces"' '83 with "spaces"' '84 with "spaces"' '85 with "spaces"' '86 with "spaces"' '87 with "spaces"' '88 with "spaces"' '89 with "spaces"' '90 with "spaces"' '91 with "spaces"' '92 with "spaces"' '93 with "spaces"' '94 with "spaces"' '95 with "spaces"' '96 with "spaces"' '97 with "spaces"' '98 with "spaces"' '99 with "spaces"' '100 with "spaces"' cat output combinewd2.pdf

All the arguments are quoted correctly. Note that this will fail if any filenames contain newlines, and that ls -v is basically ls | sort -n.

  • This works on filenames containing spaces, but not on filenames containing newlines. Although those aren't very common, they can be handled correctly with: find . -type f -maxdepth 1 -print0 | sort -zn | xargs -0 sh -c ... – joeytwiddle Feb 24 '16 at 9:15
  • Although if we are using find then we don't need xargs at all! We can use find ... -exec [command] {} + as recommended in BashFAQ/020. – joeytwiddle Feb 24 '16 at 9:16
  • @joeytwiddle Yup, use find instead of ls if there might be newlines in filenames. – andrewdotn Feb 24 '16 at 16:30
  • But argh, we can't use find directly in this case, because of the OP's desire to sort. By the way, I think the "$0" should go inside the shell's command. It's an odd quirk of sh -c 'foo' bar baz bim that bar gets passed as the $0 argument, with baz and bim in $@, while foo get executed. Experiment with: sh -c 'echo "$0" "$@"' a b c – joeytwiddle Feb 24 '16 at 20:20
  • 1
    @joeytwiddle $0 is outside so that the parent’s $0 gets passed to the child, but $@ expands to $1 ... on from xargs. It’s very subtle, which is why I lead with “It’s ugly, but …” – andrewdotn Feb 24 '16 at 21:30
7

This should work on filenames containing spaces, newlines, apostrophes and quotation marks (all of which are possible on UNIX filesystems):

find . -maxdepth 1 -type f -print0 |
  sort -zn |
  xargs -0 sh -c 'pdftk "$@" cat output combinewd2.pdf' "$0"

That might be overkill compared to the accepted answer, if you know you are working with simple filenames.

But if you are writing a script that will be used again in future, it is desirable that it won't explode one day when it meets unusual (but valid) inputs.

This is basically an adaptation of andrewdotn's answer which terminates input files with a zero-byte, instead of with a newline, hence preserving filenames which contain one or more newline characters.

The respective options -print0, -z and -0 tell each of the programs that input/output should be delimited by the zero-byte. Three different programs, three different arguments!

4

The most intuitive way I found was to:

  • first construct the commands with -I{} and "echo",
  • then execute the commands with "bash" (as if you are executing a shell script)

Here is an example to rename extensions from ".txt" to ".txt.json":

find .|grep txt$|xargs -I{} echo "mv {} {}.json"|bash

Slightly advanced example to rename .txt to .json (removing .txt extension)

find $PWD|grep txt$|cut -d"." -f1|xargs -I{} echo "mv {}.txt {}.json"|bash

I once had a requirement to append the string "End of File" to all files.

find .|grep txt|xargs -I{} echo "echo End of File >> {}"|bash

If you do it right, xargs is the king of all commands!

2

The problem here is that whilst xargs can put individual arguments in the middle of the command with -i and {}, it refuses to do this for multiple arguments. This appears to be an oversight that ends up causing us a lot of trouble!

Aside from the solutions above, another alternative is to simply add the arguments that you want to come after the files to the end of the list of files.

(
  ls | sort -n
  echo cat
  echo output
  echo combinewd2.pdf
) | xargs -d'\n' pdftk

This approach does not work on filenames containing newlines. For that rare case you should pass lines terminated with a zero byte to xargs, as offered in my other answer.

2

You can do this by chaining two calls to xargs. Use the first to chain all of the args together into one string and pass that as a param to echo, and the second using -I to place that chain of args into the place where you want it, as follows:

ls | sort -n | xargs echo | xargs -I {} pdftk {} cat output combinewd2.pdf

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