2

I am trying to write a function to reverse a string, but I got such exception when I am doing: *str++ = *end; anyone who knows what's the reason? Thanks in advance.

void reverse(char* str)
 {
    char *end = str;
    char temp;
    if(str)
    {
      while(*end)
       {
     end++;
       }
    end--;

    while(str<end)
    {
       temp = *str;
       *str++ = *end;
       *end--=temp;
    }
   }
 }
  • 3
    How do you call this method? Because a conversion from a string literal to a char* is deprecated and in this case it brings errors. – Jack Feb 2 '13 at 17:33
5

Chances are, you called the function with a string literal:

 reverse("ablewasiereisawelba");

You can't modify string literals without invoking undefined behaviour, and crash is a valid response to an attempt to modify a string literal. Make sure you pass a non-constant array instead:

 char palindrome[] = "ablewasiereisawelba";
 reverse(palindrome);

The C++ 2011 standard, ISO/IEC 14882:2011 says:

2.14.5 String literal [lex.string]

¶12 The effect of attempting to modify a string literal is undefined.

Commonly, string literals are placed in readonly memory, and an attempt to modify one leads to a 'crash'. That is certainly a perfectly legitimate response to invoking undefined behaviour.

| improve this answer | |
  • You can't modify string literals. Isn't it actually UB? (asking because not sure, not criticising) – amit Feb 2 '13 at 17:34
  • Yes, it is undefined behavior IIRC. – Jack Feb 2 '13 at 17:35
  • 1
    C++ standard ISO/IEC 14882:2011 §2.14.5 String literals says: "The effect of attempting to modify a string literal is undefined." so it is undefined behaviour. Commonly, string literals are placed in readonly memory, and an attempt to modify one leads to a crash. – Jonathan Leffler Feb 2 '13 at 17:37
0

So you need to do this:

 char str[] = "My string to reverse!";

 reverse(str);

This means that str is stored in modifiable memory. Most modern compilers store literal strings (that is 'anything within quotes' in read-only memory, because you are not meant to modify the original string).

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