57

This question already has an answer here:

I don't understand why I am getting the error:

initialization of 'element' is skipped by 'case' label.

Can someone please explain to me?

void LinkedList::process_example(int choice) {
    switch(choice) {
    case 1:
        cout << endl << endl << "Current S = ";
        this->printSet();

        cout << "Enter an element :";
        char* element = "lol";

        //cin>>element;
        cin.clear();
        cin.ignore(200, '\n');

        this->Addelementfromback(element); //error is here
        cout << endl << endl << "Current S = ";

        this->printSet();
        break;

    case 2:
        this->check_element();
        break;

    case 3:
        cout << endl << endl;
        cout << "Current Set S = ";
        this->printSet();

        cout << endl << "S has ";
        int count = this ->check_cardinality();
        cout << count << " elements";
        break;
    }
}

marked as duplicate by Caleth, Zulan, Donald Duck, Owen Pauling, stuartd Sep 29 '17 at 13:22

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

  • That error is pretty clear, also very odd use of a switch statement. – Rapptz Feb 3 '13 at 4:21
  • 6
    Each case does not introduce a new scope (only { } blocks do that). So when you declare a variable inside one case, it should put be within its own block. – Cameron Feb 3 '13 at 4:29
115

Try wrap case with {}, and put all your statement inside {}.

case 1:
{
   cout << endl << endl << "Current S = ";
   this->printSet();    
   // and other mess
}
break;

You should put all these statement in functions, keep case statement clear. For example, write this style:

case 1:
   initializeElement();
   break;
case 2:
   doSomethingElse();
   break;

See link

  • 6
    @billiz why does putting the { } solve the problem??? – Computernerd Feb 3 '13 at 4:30
  • 15
    scope issue, case: doesn't introduce new scope till break, so you have to use {} – billz Feb 3 '13 at 4:34
  • 2
    I still dont quite understand , any article i can read to better understand??? – Computernerd Feb 3 '13 at 4:38
  • 3
4

When a variable is declared in one case, the next case is technically still in the same scope so you could reference it there but if you hit that case without hitting this one first you would end up calling an uninitialised variable. This error prevents that.

All you need to do is either define it before the switch statement or use curly braces { } to make sure it goes out of scope before exiting a specific case.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.