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In these days I'm trying to study a JVM bytecode. I found opcode called FNEG described on wikipedia: use to negate a float. What is it good for? I've tried to do negation of variable in normal Java code and Eclipse reports me error that negation operator is undefined for arguments of type float. So what is it for? How can I use it?

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    Huh? Negation of floats is certainly supported in Java. – Oliver Charlesworth Feb 3 '13 at 14:39
  • How? Eclipse fires me no – user35443 Feb 3 '13 at 14:42
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    "I've tried to do negation of variable in normal Java code and Eclipse reports me error that negation operator is undefined for arguments of type float." Um...it is: pastie.org/6033481 Works a treat. My guess is that you just have a syntax error. If only you'd quoted some code so we could tell you that. :-) – T.J. Crowder Feb 3 '13 at 14:43
  • Oh. I was using different operator..... – user35443 Feb 3 '13 at 14:47
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public class temp {
    public static void main(String[] args) {
        float a = 1.0f;
        a = -a;
        System.out.println(a);
    }
}

javap -c tempgives:

Compiled from "temp.java"
public class temp extends java.lang.Object{
public temp();
  Code:
   0:   aload_0
   1:   invokespecial   #8; //Method java/lang/Object."<init>":()V
   4:   return

public static void main(java.lang.String[]);
  Code:
   0:   fconst_1
   1:   fstore_1
   2:   fload_1
   3:   fneg
   4:   fstore_1
   5:   getstatic       #16; //Field java/lang/System.out:Ljava/io/PrintStream;
   8:   fload_1
   9:   invokevirtual   #22; //Method java/io/PrintStream.println:(F)V
   12:  return

}

See 3: for fneg, standard javac.

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  • Oh. I was using different operator. – user35443 Feb 3 '13 at 14:45
  • @user35443 You tried !? Indeed, logical complement is not specified for float. – tb- Feb 3 '13 at 15:01
  • @user35443 +1 There is only one negative operator in any language I can think of - – Peter Lawrey Feb 3 '13 at 20:39
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    @PeterLawrey But Java does have three operators to which the term "negation", used in the question, might reasonably be applied, unary -, ~, and !. It would have helped if the question had included the failing source code. – Patricia Shanahan Feb 3 '13 at 23:20
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    @PatriciaShanahan From the Java tutorial you have - is Unary minus operator; negates an expression and ! is Logical complement operator; inverts the value of a boolean and The unary bitwise complement operator "~" inverts a bit pattern – Peter Lawrey Feb 4 '13 at 8:22

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