30

This was an interview question to be coded in C++:

Write code for a vending machine: Start with a simple one where it just vends one type of item. So two state variables: money and inventory, would do.

My answer:

I would use a state machine which has about 3-4 states. Use an enum variable to indicate the state and use a switch case statement, where each case has the operations to be done corresponding to each state and stay in a loop to move from one state to another.

The next question:

But using a switch case statement does not "scale well" for more states being added and modifying existing operations in a state. How are you going to deal with that problem?

I couldn't answer this question at that time. But later thought, I can probably:

  • have different functions for different states (each function corresponding to a state)
  • have an std::map from (string, function) where string indicates state to call the corresponding state function.
  • The main function has a string variable (starting in initial state), and calls the function corresponding to that variable in a loop. Each function does the operations needed and returns the new state to the main function.

My questions are:

  • What is the problem with switch-case statements with respect to scalability in the context of large scale software systems?
  • If so is my solution (which currently I feel is a bit more modular than having long linear code) going to resolve the problem?

The interview question is expecting answers from C++ idioms and design patterns for large scale software systems.

  • 4
    I think they expected you to use the State Design Pattern... – Henrique Barcelos Nov 10 '13 at 22:13
37

I was thinking in a more OO approach, using the State Pattern:

The Machine:

// machine.h
#pragma once

#include "MachineStates.h"

class AbstractState;
class Machine {
    friend class AbstractState;
    public:
        Machine(unsigned int inStockQuantity);
        void sell(unsigned int quantity);
        void refill(unsigned int quantity);
        unsigned int getCurrentStock();
        ~Machine();
    private:
        unsigned int mStockQuantity;
        AbstractState* mState;
};

// machine.cpp
#include "Machine.h"

Machine::Machine(unsigned int inStockQuantity) :
    mStockQuantity(inStockQuantity), 
    mState(inStockQuantity > 0 ? new Normal() : new SoldOut()) {
}

Machine::~Machine() {
    delete mState;
}

void Machine::sell(unsigned int quantity) {
    mState->sell(*this, quantity);
}

void Machine::refill(unsigned int quantity) {
    mState->refill(*this, quantity);
}

unsigned int Machine::getCurrentStock() {
    return mStockQuantity;
}

The States:

// MachineStates.h
#pragma once

#include "Machine.h"
#include <exception>
#include <stdexcept>

class Machine;

class AbstractState {
    public:
        virtual void sell(Machine& machine, unsigned int quantity) = 0;
        virtual void refill(Machine& machine, unsigned int quantity) = 0;
        virtual ~AbstractState();
    protected:
        void setState(Machine& machine, AbstractState* st);
        void updateStock(Machine& machine, unsigned int quantity);
};

class Normal : public AbstractState {
    public:
        virtual void sell(Machine& machine, unsigned int quantity);
        virtual void refill(Machine& machine, unsigned int quantity);
        virtual ~Normal();
};

class SoldOut : public AbstractState {
    public:
        virtual void sell(Machine& machine, unsigned int quantity);
        virtual void refill(Machine& machine, unsigned int quantity);
        virtual ~SoldOut();
};

// MachineStates.cpp
#include "MachineStates.h"

AbstractState::~AbstractState() {
}

void AbstractState::setState(Machine& machine, AbstractState* state) {
    AbstractState* aux = machine.mState;
    machine.mState = state; 
    delete aux;
}

void AbstractState::updateStock(Machine& machine, unsigned int quantity) {
    machine.mStockQuantity = quantity;
}

Normal::~Normal() {
}

void Normal::sell(Machine& machine, unsigned int quantity) {
    int currStock = machine.getCurrentStock();
    if (currStock < quantity) {
        throw std::runtime_error("Not enough stock");
    }

    updateStock(machine, currStock - quantity);

    if (machine.getCurrentStock() == 0) {
        setState(machine, new SoldOut());
    }
}

void Normal::refill(Machine& machine, unsigned int quantity) {
    int currStock = machine.getCurrentStock();
    updateStock(machine, currStock + quantity);
}

SoldOut::~SoldOut() {
}

void SoldOut::sell(Machine& machine, unsigned int quantity) {
    throw std::runtime_error("Sold out!");
}

void SoldOut::refill(Machine& machine, unsigned int quantity) {
    updateStock(machine, quantity);
    setState(machine, new Normal());
}

I'm not used to program in C++, but this code aparently compiles against GCC 4.8.2 and valgrind shows no leaks, so I guess it's fine. I'm not computing money, but I don't need this to show you the idea.

To test it:

#include <iostream>
#include <stdexcept>
#include "Machine.h"
#include "MachineStates.h"

int main() {
    Machine m(10), m2(0);

    m.sell(10);
    std::cout << "m: " << "Sold 10 items" << std::endl;

    try {
        m.sell(1);
    } catch (std::exception& e) {
        std::cerr << "m: " << e.what() << std::endl;
    }

    m.refill(20);
    std::cout << "m: " << "Refilled 20 items" << std::endl;

    m.sell(10);
    std::cout << "m: " << "Sold 10 items" << std::endl;
    std::cout << "m: " << "Remaining " << m.getCurrentStock() << " items" << std::endl;

    m.sell(5);
    std::cout << "m: " << "Sold 5 items" << std::endl;
    std::cout << "m: " << "Remaining " << m.getCurrentStock() << " items" << std::endl;

    try {
        m.sell(10);
    } catch (std::exception& e) {
        std::cerr << "m: " << e.what() << std::endl;
    }

    try {
        m2.sell(1);
    } catch (std::exception& e) {
        std::cerr << "m2: " << e.what() << std::endl;
    }

    return 0;
}

Output is:

m: Sold 10 items
m: Sold out!
m: Refilled 20 items
m: Sold 10 items
m: Remaining 10 items
m: Sold 5 items
m: Remaining 5 items
m: Not enough stock
m2: Not enough stock

Now, if you want to add a Broken state, all you need is another AbstractState child. Maybe you'll need to add a broken property on Machine also.

To add more products, you must have a map of products and its respective in-stock quantity and so on...

  • 1
    Also the machine should be initialized to Normal or SoldOut state based on the quantity, not always Normal by default. – zar Jan 9 '15 at 19:49
24

Consider using tables instead of switch statements. One column could be the transition criteria and another column is the destination state.

This scales nicely because you don't have to change the table processing function; just add another row to the table.

+------------------+---------------------+---------------+
| Current state ID | transition criteria | Next state ID |
+------------------+---------------------+---------------+
|                  |                     |               |
+------------------+---------------------+---------------+

In my code at work, we use a column of function pointers rather than the "Next state ID". The table is a separate file with accessor functions defined. There is one or more include statements to resolve each function pointer.

Edit 1: Example of separate table files.

table.h

#ifndef TABLE_H
#define TABLE_H

struct Table_Entry
{
    unsigned int  current_state_id;
    unsigned char transition_letter;
    unsigned int  next_state_id;
};

Table_Entry const *    table_begin(void);
Table_Entry const *    table_end(void);

#endif // TABLE_H

table.cpp:

#include "table.h"

static const Table_Entry    my_table[] =
{
    //  Current   Transition     Next
    //  State ID    Letter     State ID
    {    0,          'A',        1}, // From 0 goto 1 if letter is 'A'.
    {    0,          'B',        2}, // From 0 goto 2 if letter is 'B'.
    {    0,          'C',        3}, // From 0 goto 3 if letter is 'C'.
    {    1,          'A',        1}, // From 1 goto 1 if letter is 'A'.
    {    1,          'B',        3}, // From 1 goto 3 if letter is 'B'.
    {    1,          'C',        0}, // From 1 goto 0 if letter is 'C'.
};

static const unsigned int  TABLE_SIZE =  
    sizeof(my_table) / sizeof(my_table[0]);


Table_Entry const *
table_begin(void)
{
    return &my_table[0];
}


Table_Entry const *
table_end(void)
{
    return &my_table[TABLE_SIZE];
}  

state_machine.cpp

#include "table.h"
#include <iostream>

using namespace std;  // Because I'm lazy.

void
Execute_State_Machine(void)
{
    unsigned int current_state = 0;
    while (1)
    {
        char transition_letter;
        cout << "Current state: " << current_state << "\n";
        cout << "Enter transition letter: ";
        cin >> transition_letter;
        cin.ignore(1000, '\n'); /* Eat up the '\n' still in the input stream */
        Table_Entry const *  p_entry = table_begin();
        Table_Entry const * const  p_table_end =  table_end();
        bool state_found = false;
        while ((!state_found) && (p_entry != p_table_end))
        {
            if (p_entry->current_state_id == current_state)
            {
                if (p_entry->transition_letter == transition_letter)
                {
                    cout << "State found, transitioning"
                         << " from state " << current_state
                         << ", to state " << p_entry->next_state_id
                         << "\n";
                    current_state = p_entry->next_state_id;
                    state_found = true;
                    break;
                }
             }
             ++p_entry;
         }
         if (!state_found)
         {
             cerr << "Transition letter not found, current state not changed.\n";
         }
    }
}
  • Please could you give more details of how you are going to code this table in the separate file with accessor functions. If possible, by taking a small example state machine: 3 states(A, B, C); A(), B(), C() are the functions that have the operations needed to be done in each. – Romonov Feb 3 '13 at 21:12
  • @Romonov: See new edited answer. – Thomas Matthews Feb 3 '13 at 22:50
  • 7
    @Sanhadrin: Why is it not C++? I'll admit it is not object oriented, but it is compatible with both C and C++. Is it because I'm not using function objects, or the std::map structure? I explicitly use a table because the table can be compiled as static data and doesn't have to be initialized like an std::map. – Thomas Matthews Jun 12 '14 at 23:32
  • 1
    I've spent a lot of time on trying all kinds of types of state machines, but a transition table just works the best in almost every problem I have with them. +1 for a really nice piece of code there! – Zimano Dec 4 '15 at 15:37
  • 4
    I don't agree with statements like "this is not C++". Sorry, if it compiles with a standards-compliant compiler, then it is C++ code. End of story. You can say it's not OO, but the beauty of C++ is that it doesn't force any one paradigm down your throat. – chili Oct 13 '16 at 1:12
7

I once wrote a state machine in C++, where I needed the same transition for a lot of state pairs (source → target pairs). I want to illustrate an example:

4 -> 8   \
5 -> 9    \_ action1()
6 -> 10   /
7 -> 11  /

8 -> 4   \
9 -> 5    \_ action2()
10 -> 6   /
11 -> 7  /

What I came up with was a set of (transition criteria + next state + "action" function to be called). To keep things general, both the transition criteria and the next state were written as functors (lambda functions):

typedef std::function<bool(int)> TransitionCriteria;
typedef std::function<int(int)>  TransitionNewState;
typedef std::function<void(int)> TransitionAction;   // gets passed the old state

This solution is nice if you have a lot of transitions which apply for a lot of different states as in the example above. However, for each "step", this method requires to linearly scan the list of all different transitions.

For the examples above, there would be two such transitions:

struct Transition {
    TransitionCriteria criteria;
    TransitionNewState newState;
    TransitionAction action;

    Transition(TransitionCriteria c, TransitionNewState n, TransitionAction a)
        : criteria(c), newState(n), action(a) {}
};
std::vector<Transition> transitions;

transitions.push_back(Transition(
    [](int oldState){ return oldState >= 4 && oldState < 8; },
    [](int oldState){ return oldState + 4; },
    [](int oldState){ std::cout << "action1" << std::endl; }
));
transitions.push_back(Transition(
    [](int oldState){ return oldState >= 8 && oldState < 12; },
    [](int oldState){ return oldState - 4; },
    [](int oldState){ std::cout << "action2" << std::endl; }
));
5

I don't know whether that would have gotten you through the interview, but I'd personally refrain from coding any state machine by hand, especially if it's in a professional setting. State machines are a well researched problem, and there exist well tested open source tools which often produce superior code to what you will produce yourself by hand, and they also help you with diagnosing problems with your state machine by eg. being able to generate state diagrams automatically.

My goto tools for this kind of problem are:

4

I've written plenty of state machines using these methods. But when I wrote Cisco's Transceiver Library for the Nexus 7000 (a $117,000 switch) I used a method I invented in the 80's. That was to use a macro which makes the state machine look more like multi-tasking blocking code. The macros are written for C but I have used them with small modifications for C++ when I worked for DELL. You can read more about it here: https://www.codeproject.com/Articles/37037/Macros-to-simulate-multi-tasking-blocking-code-at

2
#include <stdio.h>
#include <iostream>

using namespace std;
class State;

enum state{ON=0,OFF};
class Switch {
    private:
        State* offState;
        State* onState;
        State* currState;
    public:
        ~Switch();
        Switch();
        void SetState(int st);
        void on();
        void off();
};
class State{
    public:
        State(){}
        virtual void on(Switch* op){}
        virtual void off(Switch* op){} 
};
class OnState : public State{
    public:
    OnState(){
        cout << "OnState State Initialized" << endl;
    }
    void on(Switch* op);
    void off(Switch* op);
};
class OffState : public State{
    public:
    OffState(){
        cout << "OffState State Initialized" << endl;
    }
    void on(Switch* op);
    void off(Switch* op);
};
Switch::Switch(){
    offState = new OffState();
    onState = new OnState();
    currState=offState;
}
Switch::~Switch(){
    if(offState != NULL)
        delete offState;
    if(onState != NULL)
        delete onState;
}
void Switch::SetState(int newState){
    if(newState == ON)
    {
        currState = onState;
    }
    else if(newState == OFF)
    {
        currState = offState;
    }
}
void Switch::on(){
    currState->on(this);
}
void Switch::off(){
    currState->off(this);
}
void OffState::on(Switch* op){
    cout << "State transition from OFF to ON" << endl;
    op->SetState(ON);
}
void OffState::off(Switch* op){
    cout << "Already in OFF state" << endl;
}
void OnState::on(Switch* op){
    cout << "Already in ON state" << endl;
}
void OnState::off(Switch* op){
    cout << "State transition from ON to OFF" << endl;
    op->SetState(OFF);
}
int main(){
    Switch* swObj = new Switch();
    int ch;
    do{
        switch(ch){
            case 1:     swObj->on();
                    break;
            case 0:     swObj->off();
                    break;
            default :   cout << "Invalid choice"<<endl;
                    break;
        }
        cout << "Enter 0/1: ";
        cin >> ch;  
    }while(true);`enter code here`
    delete swObj;
    return 0;
}

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