167

Seems like there has been a recent update to Google Chrome that causes blurry text after doing a transform: scale(). Specifically I'm doing this:

@-webkit-keyframes bounceIn {
  0% {
    opacity: 0;
    -webkit-transform: scale(.3);
  }

  50% {
    opacity: 1;
    -webkit-transform: scale(1.05);
  }

  70% {
    -webkit-transform: scale(.9);
  }

  100% {
    -webkit-transform: scale(1);
  }
}

If you visit http://rourkery.com in Chrome, you should see the problem on the main text area. It didn't used to do this and it doesn't seem to effect other webkit browsers (like Safari). There were some other posts about people experiencing a similar issue with 3d transforms, but can't find anything about 2d transforms like this.

Any ideas would be appreciated, thanks!

5
  • Just visited the site using Firefox and IE 10, don't see the problem. If it's limited to Chrome, you might need to wait for Google to fix it themselves.
    – Nolonar
    Feb 3, 2013 at 21:29
  • I've come across this problem earlier too, as Nolonar mentioned we'll have to wait for Google to fix it.
    – raj_n
    Mar 4, 2013 at 19:02
  • Not a solution, but I have noticed that the issue only occurs for me when I use CSS optimizeLegibility.
    – Bangkokian
    Feb 22, 2019 at 7:50
  • Link is broken.
    – Timothy003
    Dec 17, 2019 at 7:32
  • html5rocks.com/en/tutorials/internals/antialiasing-101 Anyone who suffers from blurry text should read this old article by Paul Lewis. In short it's mainly all about Subpixel antialiasing quirks.
    – dziku86
    Feb 24, 2021 at 8:50

36 Answers 36

104

I have had this problem a number of times and there seems to be 2 ways of fixing it (shown below). You can use either of these properties to fix the rendering, or both at the same time.

Backface visibility hidden fixes the problem as it simplifies the animation to just the front of the object, whereas the default state is the front and the back.

backface-visibility: hidden;

TranslateZ also works as it is a hack to add hardware acceleration to the animation.

transform: translateZ(0);

Both of these properties fix the problem that you are having but some people also like to add

-webkit-font-smoothing: subpixel-antialiased;

to their animated object. I find that it can change the rendering of a web font but feel free to experiment with that method too.

8
  • 17
    These techniques all seem to improve things, but I still can't get Chrome to the same level of clarity that I see in Firefox. Apr 16, 2014 at 11:25
  • 15
    backface-visibility: hidden; sure worked in my case, in solving some weird blurry movement cause by opacity transition, that is. The weird movement is now gone, BUT it has made the texts in my div permanently blurred instead.
    – ITWitch
    Jan 18, 2017 at 8:45
  • 17
    As @ykadaru suggested, try adding perspective(1px) to your transform: code, this worked for me in Chrome while nothing else solved the problem Apr 24, 2017 at 9:46
  • 4
    Does not work on Chrome Version 65.0.3325.162 (Official Build) (64-bit) running in Ubuntu 17.10 with Gnome X11 session (Wayland off)
    – Marecky
    Mar 22, 2018 at 9:20
  • 3
    In Chrome 72 the first two options cause the text to be blurry during & at the end of the transform
    – brandito
    Jan 17, 2019 at 1:31
40

After trying everything else here with no luck, what finally fixed this issue for me was removing the will-change: transform; property. For some reason it caused horribly blurry looking scaling in Chrome, but not Firefox.

7
  • 5
    Why would anyone downvote this? I don't get it... :( This is a completely valid issue in some versions of chrome, and it seems "will-change" in general is still pretty new and probably shouldn't be used. For more info see greensock.com/will-change
    – Dan
    Feb 8, 2019 at 14:05
  • Had the same issue. Thanks for posting.
    – raine
    Feb 21, 2019 at 21:33
  • 1
    I had the same issue with material-design-components rendering on Chrome 75. Removing the "will-changed" css style fixed it.
    – Rob
    Jul 16, 2019 at 14:16
  • Confirmed in Chrome 79 Jan 13, 2020 at 11:54
  • 7
    I have the opposite, adding will-change: transform; slightly fixes the issue Mar 6, 2020 at 13:30
31

To improve the blurriness, esp. on Chrome, try doing this:

transform: perspective(1px) translateZ(0);
backface-visibility: hidden;

UPDATE: Perspective adds distance between the user and the z-plane, which technically scales the object, making the blurriness seem 'permanent'. The perspective(1px) above is like duck-tape because we're matching the blurriness we're trying to solve. You might have better luck with the css below:

transform: translateZ(0);
backface-visibility: hidden;
4
  • 6
    For me, this actually makes it worse.
    – balu
    Mar 29, 2018 at 13:14
  • 1
    For me this fixes the glitch (without this, the element moves 1px after animation is done, transform: perspective(1px) alone fix this!)
    – Sergiu
    Mar 22, 2019 at 8:06
  • @balu check my updated answer! get rid of the perspective(1px) property and see if it works better.
    – ykadaru
    Apr 25, 2019 at 18:33
  • You answered with exactly the same question code. Dec 16, 2021 at 10:45
21

I found that adjusting the scale ratio helped slightly.

Using scale(1.048) over (1.05) seemed to generate a better approximation to a whole-pixel font size, reducing the sub-pixel blurring.

I also used translateZ(0) which seems to adjust Chrome's final rounding step in the transform animation. This is a plus for my onhover usage because it increases speed and reduces visual noise. For an onclick function however, I wouldn't use it because, the transformed font doesn't appear to be as crispy.

2
  • 3
    That's the only approach that worked for me. The other approaches (backface-visibility, adding filters, perspective and good old translateZ) just made it worse. Try scaling to whole pixels. For example go from 14px to 16px using a scale factor of 1,1429 (16/14). May 8, 2018 at 22:21
  • 3
    Worked for me without translateZ(0), changed just 1.05 to 1.048
    – A. Volg
    Sep 16, 2019 at 8:50
19

Instead of

transform: scale(1.5);

using

zoom : 150%;

fixes the text blurring problem in Chrome.

10
  • 1
    It can help but also introduces other issues, like white border lines being introduced sometimes
    – Kevin
    Apr 20, 2015 at 22:35
  • 2
    not sure why the downvote. When I applied this to checkboxes this worked much better than transform: scale() Sep 25, 2015 at 2:11
  • 3
    For firefox, use transform: scale() works like charm without any blurriness. You'll have to work on browser detection and act accordingly for chrome/safari and firefox. Dec 8, 2015 at 20:15
  • 20
    Another issue is that zoom doesn't seem to work with the transition property, so it can't be used for CSS animations
    – ericgrosse
    Mar 19, 2016 at 15:34
  • 3
    It works and fox the blur thing, but it also changes position of elements. Dec 7, 2016 at 17:18
10

This must be a bug with Chrome (Version 56.0.2924.87), but the below fixes the bluriness for me when changing css properties in the console('.0'). I'll report it.

filter: blur(.0px)
3
  • 1
    Did you get anywhere with your bug report?
    – Diazole
    Nov 20, 2018 at 13:38
  • afraid I don't even recall where I submitted the bug to. Did so though.
    – andyw
    Nov 20, 2018 at 15:46
  • I'm using Bootstrap (4.4.1), Chrome (80.0.3987.132), Windows 10 (with view 125% scaled up) and I have blurry texts in dropdown menu. The menu is positioned using transform: translate3d(); and this seems to cause the problem. None of the suggested solutions worked for me. Except/kinda this one. This works only if I set it first to some positive value (e.g., blur(0.1px)) and then change to blur(0px). Since the element is dynamic, and also requires a dynamic (JS) solution, ... this sucks :\
    – akinuri
    Mar 13, 2020 at 8:43
8

Sunderls lead me to the answer. Except filter: scale does not exist, but filter: blur does.

Apply the next declarations to the elements that appear blurred (in my case they were inside a transformed element):

backface-visibility: hidden;    
-webkit-filter: blur(0);

It almost worked perfectly. "Almost" because i'm using a transition and while in transition, elements don't look perfect, but once the transition is done, they do.

3
  • -webkit-filter: blur(0); alone works for me. backface-visibility: hidden; blurs my element when I reset the scaling afterwards. Feb 5, 2016 at 12:30
  • this is kinda funny for Chrome... if i set blur(0px); it doesnt fix it. but if i do blur(1px); and then press the arrow down key to blur(0px); it does look correct. Gone on page refresh / no matter what I write in the CSS Sep 30, 2016 at 7:12
  • 1
    @TomRoggero This sounds less specific to the blur property value and more about when redraw of the layout is done. You could experiment forcing redraw of the element using JavaScript after some delay.
    – Gajus
    Aug 16, 2017 at 9:59
6

I found out, that the problem occures on relative transforms in any way. translateX(50%), scale(1.1) or what ever. providing absolute values always works (does not produce blurry text(ures)).

None of the solutions mentions here worked, and I think there is not solution, yet (using Chrome 62.0.3202.94 while I am writing this).

In my case transform: translateY(-50%) translateX(-50%) causes the blur (I want to center a dialog).

To reach a bit more "absolute" values, I had to set decimal values to transform: translateY(-50.09%) translateX(-50.09%).

NOTE

I am quite sure, that this values vary on different screen sizes. I just wanted to share my experiences, in case it helps someone.

1
  • I was running in to this exact same issue doing the exact same thing. I was centering a modal with translate3d(-50%, -50%, 0). In my case, I bumped up the values to -50.048% and it looks perfect. Nov 20, 2019 at 15:19
5

I have found a much better and clean solution:

.element{
 transform:scale(0.5) 
 transform-origin: 100% 0;
}

or

.element{
 transform:scale(0.5) 
 transform-origin: 0% 0;
}

Thanks to this post: Preventing blurry rendering with transform: scale

1
  • 1
    This 'solved' the problem in Firefox 85 on Windows and improved, but not completely solved in Chrome 88... Also, sadly, you can't really use it freely. Feb 1, 2021 at 14:35
5

I have this same problem. I fixed this using:

.element {
  display: table
}
2
  • 4
    insane but it works; Chrome is the new IE apparently
    – Arthur
    Feb 18, 2020 at 14:16
  • oooow lord! ir works! i guess table 'fix' de width in PX did not possible width with half-pixel... Jul 8, 2020 at 20:10
4

In my case following code caused blurry font:

-webkit-transform: translate(-50%,-50%);
transform: translate(-50%,-50%);

and just adding zoom property fixed it for me. Play around with zoom, following worked for me:

zoom: 97%;   
1
4

Another fix to try i just found for blurry transforms (translate3d, scaleX) on Chrome is to set the element as "display: inline-table;". It seems to force pixel rounding in some case (on the X axis).

I read subpixel positioning under Chrome was intended and devs won't fix it.

0
3

Try using zoom: 101%; for complex designs when you can't use a combination of zoom + scale.

1
3

2019 Update
The Chrome display bug is still unfixed and though no fault of the patrons, none of the suggestions offered in the entirety of this website help to resolve the issue. I can concur that I have tried every single one of them in vain: only 1 comes close and that's the css rule: filter:blur(0); which eliminates the shifting of a container by 1px but does not resolve the blurred display bug of the container itself and any content it may have.

Here's the reality: there literally is no fix to this problem so here is a work around for fluid websites

CASE
I'm currently developing a fluid website and have 3 divs, all centered with hover effects and sharing percentage values in both the width and position. The Chrome bug occurs on the center container which is set to left:50%; and transform:translateX(-50%); a common setting.

EXAMPLE: First the HTML...

<div id="box1" class="box">
    Lorem Ipsum is simply dummy text of the printing and typesetting industry. Lorem Ipsum has been the industry"s standard dummy text ever since the 1500s, when an unknown printer took a galley of type and scrambled it to make a type specimen book.
</div>

<div id="box2" class="box">
    Lorem Ipsum is simply dummy text of the printing and typesetting industry. Lorem Ipsum has been the industry"s standard dummy text ever since the 1500s, when an unknown printer took a galley of type and scrambled it to make a type specimen book.
</div>

<div id="box3" class="box">
    Lorem Ipsum is simply dummy text of the printing and typesetting industry. Lorem Ipsum has been the industry"s standard dummy text ever since the 1500s, when an unknown printer took a galley of type and scrambled it to make a type specimen book.
</div>

Here's the CSS where the Chrome bug occurs...

*{margin:0; padding:0; border:0; outline:0; box-sizing:border-box;  background:#505050;}
.box {position:absolute; border:1px solid #fff; border-radius:10px; width:26%; background:#8e1515; padding:25px; top:20px; font-size:12pt; color:#fff; overflow:hidden; text-align:center; transition:0.5s ease-in-out;}
.box:hover {background:#191616;}
.box:active {background:#191616;}
.box:focus {background:#191616;}
#box1 {left:5%;}
#box2 {left:50%; transform:translateX(-50%);} /* Bugged */
#box3 {right:5%;}

Here's the fixed css...

*{margin:0; padding:0; border:0; outline:0; box-sizing:border-box;  background:#505050;}
.box {position:absolute; border:1px solid #fff; border-radius:10px; width:26%; background:#8e1515; padding:25px; top:20px; font-size:12pt; color:#fff; overflow:hidden; text-align:center; transition:0.5s ease-in-out;}
.box:hover {background:#191616;}
.box:active {background:#191616;}
.box:focus {background:#191616;}
#box1 {left:5%;}
#box2 {left:37%;} /* Fixed */
#box3 {right:5%;}

Bugged fiddle: https://jsfiddle.net/m9bgrunx/2/
Fixed fiddle: https://jsfiddle.net/uoc6e2dm/2/

As you can see a small amount of tweaking to the CSS should reduce or eliminate the requirement to use transform for positioning. This could also apply to fixed width websites as well as fluid.

4
  • Blurriness is expected when using translation, because the element can end up on a half pixel. There are now better alternatives for centering things: flexbox sample, grid sample
    – Timothy003
    Dec 17, 2019 at 6:47
  • The only browser I've tested which seems to have an issue with transform center is Chrome, everything else appears crystal clear. I looked back and this issue has been around for 7 years! Still there's plenty of ways to skin a cat and like you say it's not even required anymore.
    – SJacks
    Dec 17, 2019 at 7:27
  • this is unbelievable, but filter: blur (-0.1px); helped me !!. how the hell does this work ??
    – jt3k
    Mar 31, 2020 at 4:40
  • @jt3k You're forcing Chrome to render in software, which rounds to the nearest pixel. In short: don't do that.
    – Timothy003
    Oct 10, 2021 at 8:18
2

It's important to add that this issue arises if the element which is being translated has a height with an odd number of pixels. So, if you have control over the height of the element, setting it to an even number will make the content appear crisp

3
  • I used even numbered dimensions, and the element is still blurry. Aug 22, 2017 at 20:12
  • This simply doesn't add anything to this post.
    – Leo
    Nov 14, 2018 at 16:54
  • Using even numbers didn't help with the bluriness of the animation BUT it helped with my subpixel positionning, which was another problem I had when positionning items in an infinite scroll. Thanks for the tip ! Oct 15, 2020 at 21:45
2

None of above worked for me. I had this animation for popups:

@keyframes pulse {
  from {
    transform: scale3d(1, 1, 1);
  }
  50% {
    transform: scale3d(1.05, 1.05, 1.05);
  }
  to {
    transform: scale3d(1, 1, 1);
  }
}

In my case blurry effect was gone after applying this rule: -webkit-perspective: 1000; even though it is marked as unused in Chrome inspector.

1
  • It works for me and it is also marked as unused. I have also added will-change: transform; that fixes blurry of elements borders. Any other answers didn't worked for me. Mar 6, 2020 at 13:49
2

None of the above worked for me.

It worked when I added perspective

ie from

transform : translate3d(-10px,-20px,0) scale3d(0.7,0.7, 1)

i changed to

transform : perspective(1px) translate3d(-10px,-20px,0) scale3d(0.7,0.7, 1)

1
  • Adding perspective(1px) actually made it worse for me :(
    – balu
    Mar 29, 2018 at 13:25
2

I used a combination of all answers and this is what worked for me in the end:

.modal .modal--transition {
  display: inline-table;
  transform: perspective(1px) scale(1) translateZ(0);
  backface-visibility: hidden;
  -webkit-font-smoothing: subpixel-antialiased;
}
2

My solution was:

display: initial;

Then it was crispy sharp

1
  • Note that this won't work on span or any other inline elements. Jun 23 at 0:37
2

I was facing the blurry text issue on Chrome but not on Firefox when I used transform: translate(-50%,-50%).

Well, I really tried a lot of workarounds like:

transform: perspective(1px);
filter: blur(0);
transform: translateZ(0);
backface-visibility: hidden;

None of these worked to me.

Finally, I made the height and width of the element even. It resolved the issue for me!!!

Note: It might depend from use case to use case. But surely worth a try!

2
  • Yes, using width:0 and height:0, and animating with transition : width .15s, height.15s (instead of transform:scale(0) and transition:transform .15s) does the job, but you lose the transform origin (may be I can hack this by animating margin), and it is a little bit janky (I can see 2-3 intermediate frames) Oct 15, 2020 at 21:26
  • You should use backface-visibility: hidden; AND transform: translateZ(0); . Z transform tells the engine to use 3D rendering. Until that, backface-visibility has no effect. Jan 13, 2021 at 11:43
2

I have tried a lot of examples from these answers unfortunately nothing help for Chrome Version 81.0.4044.138 I have added to transforming element instead

 transform-origin: 50% 50%;

this one

 transform-origin: 51% 51%;

it helps for me

0
2

This is what worked for me:

body { perspective: 1px; }

1
1

I fixed my case by adding:

transform: perspective(-1px)
1
  • 2
    This for me just removed the scale() transform result
    – jpenna
    Apr 30, 2019 at 3:52
1

I removed this from my code - transform-style: preserve-3d; and added this- transform: perspective(1px) translateZ(0);

the blur went away!

1

FOR CHORME:

I´ve tried all suggestions here. But diden't work. My college found a great solution, that works better:

You should NOT scale past 1.0

And include translateZ(0) in the hover but NOT in the none-hover/initial position.

Example:

a {
    transition: all 500ms cubic-bezier(0.165, 0.840, 0.440, 1.000);
    transform: scale(0.8, 0.8);
}

a:hover {
    transform: translateZ(0)scale(1.0, 1.0);
}
1
  • 3
    Now for me it starts blurry and goes to clear.
    – Ian Wesley
    Jan 12, 2021 at 17:44
1

I have a div that has a small perspective shift on it to give a subtle 3D effect. The text in the div was blurring and I tried all the suggestions here to no avail.

Oddly, I found that setting 'filter: inherit;' on the text elements vastly improved the clarity. Though I can't understand why.

Here's my code in case it helps:

Html:

<div id="NavContainer">
    <div id="Nav">
        <label>Title</label>
        <nav>
            <a href="/">home</a>
            <a href="/link1">link1</a>
            <a href="/link2">link2</a>
        </nav>
    </div>
</div>

Css:

    #NavContainer {
        position: absolute;
        z-index: 1;
        top: 0;
        left: 20px;
        right: 20px;
        perspective: 80vw;
        perspective-origin: top center;
    }

    #Nav {
        text-align: right;
        transform: rotateX(-5deg);
    }

        #Nav > nav > a,
        #Nav > label {
            display: inline-block;
            filter: inherit;
        }

        #Nav > label {
            float: left;
            font-weight: bold;
        }
0

For me the problem was that my elements were using transformStyle: preserve-3d. I realized that this wasn't actually needed for the app and removing it fixed the blurriness.

0

In Chrome 74.0.3729.169, current as of 5-25-19, there doesn't seem to be any fix for blurring occurring at certain browser zoom levels caused by the transform. Even a simple TransformY(50px) will blur the element. This doesn't occur in current versions of Firefox, Edge or Safari, and it doesn't seem to occur at all zoom levels.

1
  • This is what happened to my. I can't get rid of this blur effect. One solution which have worked is to set these properties: top: 0, bottom: 0, left: 0; right: 0; margin: auto but then the container will take the whole space it can (it must be width), so this doesn't work in case when the content should decide how big container will be.
    – kwiat1990
    Aug 14, 2019 at 7:17
0

It will be difficult to solve with only css.

So I solved it with jquery.

This is my CSS.

.trY {
   top: 50%;
   transform: translateY(-50%);
}

.trX {
   left: 50%;
   transform: translateX(-50%);
}

.trXY {
   top: 50%;
   left: 50%;
   transform: translate(-50%, -50%);
}

and this is my jquery.

function tr_init() {
$(".trY, .trX, .trXY").each(function () {
    if ($(this).outerWidth() % 2 != 0) {
        var fixed_width = Math.ceil($(this).outerWidth() / 2) * 2;
        $(this).css("width", fixed_width);
    }
    if ($(this).outerHeight() % 2 != 0) {
        var fixed_height = Math.ceil($(this).outerHeight() / 2) * 2;
        $(this).css("height", fixed_height);
    }
})}
0

Just to add to the fix craze, putting {border:1px solid #???} around the badly looking object fixes the issue for me. In case you have a stable background colour, consider this too. This is so dumb noone thought about mentioning I guess, eh eh.

1
  • This did not make a difference for me Jun 23 at 0:40

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