112

I have the following classes in TypeScript:

class bar {
    length: number;
}

class foo {
    bars: bar[] = new Array();
}

And then I have:

var ham = new foo();
ham.bars = [
    new bar() {          // <-- compiler says Expected "]" and Expected ";"
        length = 1
    }
];

Is there a way to do that in TypeScript?

UPDATE

I came up with another solution by having a set method to return itself:

class bar {
    length: number;

    private ht: number;
    height(h: number): bar {
        this.ht = h; return this;
    }

    constructor(len: number) {
        this.length = len;
    }
}

class foo {
    bars: bar[] = new Array();
    setBars(items: bar[]) {
        this.bars = items;
        return this;
    }
}

so you can initialize it as below:

var ham = new foo();
ham.setBars(
    [
        new bar(1).height(2),
        new bar(3)
    ]);
1
  • It would be really useful to have object initializers in TypeScript similar to C#. [ {length: 1} ] is not instance of bar but if supported, new bar() { length = 1 } would be instance of bar. Maybe we should make a feature suggestion for this?
    – orad
    Commented Aug 19, 2013 at 18:30

5 Answers 5

87

There isn't a field initialization syntax like that for objects in JavaScript or TypeScript.

Option 1:

class bar {
    // Makes a public field called 'length'
    constructor(public length: number) { }
}

bars = [ new bar(1) ];

Option 2:

interface bar {
    length: number;
}

bars = [ {length: 1} ];
3
  • 11
    to make things clearer and typesafe : bars:bar[]=[{length:1}]
    – Patrice
    Commented Jun 19, 2017 at 13:38
  • Is there any way to do this without defining classes?
    – Liu Zhang
    Commented Dec 11, 2017 at 17:02
  • 2
    The question is about how to initialize an array in a class. There isn't a way to initialize an array in a class without using classes. Commented Dec 11, 2017 at 19:16
28

If you really want to have named parameters plus have your objects be instances of your class, you can do the following:

class bar {
    constructor (options?: {length: number; height: number;}) {
        if (options) {
            this.length = options.length;
            this.height = options.height;
        }
    }
    length: number;
    height: number;
}

class foo {
    bars: bar[] = new Array();
}

var ham = new foo();
ham.bars = [
    new bar({length: 4, height: 2}),
    new bar({length: 1, height: 3})
];

Also here's the related item on typescript issue tracker.

1
  • 1
    +1 for issue link. You can also make initializer values optional: options? : {length?: number; height?: number;}
    – Sam
    Commented Aug 5, 2016 at 10:37
15

A simple solution could be:

interface bar {
    length: number;
}

let bars: bar[];
bars = [];
4

If you would like to 'add' additional items to a page, you may want to create an array of maps. This is how I created an array of maps and then added results to it:

import { Product } from '../models/product';

products: Array<Product>;          // Initialize the array.

[...]

let i = 0;
this.service.products( i , (result) => {

    if ( i == 0 ) {
        // Create the first element of the array.
        this.products = Array(result);
    } else { 
        // Add to the array of maps.
        this.products.push(result);
    }

});

Where product.ts look like...

export class Product {
    id: number;
    [...]
}
1
  • If you initialise the Array like this: products: Array<Product> = []; you don't have to do the if clause.
    – Juuro
    Commented Jan 21, 2022 at 17:32
3

An other solution:

interface bar {
    length: number;
}

bars = [{
  length: 1
} as bar];

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