72

I want to create a new column in a data.table calculated from the current value of one column and the previous of another. Is it possible to access previous rows?

E.g.:

> DT <- data.table(A=1:5, B=1:5*10, C=1:5*100)
> DT
   A  B   C
1: 1 10 100
2: 2 20 200
3: 3 30 300
4: 4 40 400
5: 5 50 500
> DT[, D := C + BPreviousRow] # What is the correct code here?

The correct answer should be

> DT
   A  B   C   D
1: 1 10 100  NA
2: 2 20 200 210
3: 3 30 300 320
4: 4 40 400 430
5: 5 50 500 540
  • I usually set a key to my data.tables: DT <- data.table(A=..., key = "A") – PatrickT Jun 21 '16 at 8:08
95

With shift() implemented in v1.9.6, this is quite straightforward.

DT[ , D := C + shift(B, 1L, type="lag")]
# or equivalently, in this case,
DT[ , D := C + shift(B)]

From NEWS:

  1. New function shift() implements fast lead/lag of vector, list, data.frames or data.tables. It takes a type argument which can be either "lag" (default) or "lead". It enables very convenient usage along with := or set(). For example: DT[, (cols) := shift(.SD, 1L), by=id]. Please have a look at ?shift for more info.

See history for previous answers.

  • Does that .N hold the current row number or something? Sorry to ask here, but I can't seem to find it in the help files... – SlowLearner Feb 4 '13 at 15:24
  • 7
    @SlowLearner: You might also find .I useful, which holds the row indices for the rows in the curren group. – Steve Lianoglou Feb 4 '13 at 16:02
  • 7
    Use seq_len(.N - 1) instead of 1:(.N-1). This avoids problems associated with 1:0. – mnel Feb 4 '13 at 19:08
  • 1
    +1 for the .SD example--I was trying to use a lapply and getting funky results. this is much simpler. – MichaelChirico Apr 26 '15 at 22:41
  • Where can I find an updated pdf with all this new information ? The official 1.9.4 vignettes and webminars don't include it. And the Rmd 1.9.5 vignettes are not comfortable and don't include it either. – skan Apr 30 '15 at 16:45
28

Using dplyr you could do:

mutate(DT, D = lag(B) + C)

Which gives:

#   A  B   C   D
#1: 1 10 100  NA
#2: 2 20 200 210
#3: 3 30 300 320
#4: 4 40 400 430
#5: 5 50 500 540
  • 2
    Underrated answer - thank you for sharing. – B C Nov 19 '18 at 18:25
20

Several folks have answered the specific question. See the code below for a general purpose function that I use in situations like this that may be helpful. Rather than just getting the prior row, you can go as many rows in the "past" or "future" as you'd like.

rowShift <- function(x, shiftLen = 1L) {
  r <- (1L + shiftLen):(length(x) + shiftLen)
  r[r<1] <- NA
  return(x[r])
}

# Create column D by adding column C and the value from the previous row of column B:
DT[, D := C + rowShift(B,-1)]

# Get the Old Faithul eruption length from two events ago, and three events in the future:
as.data.table(faithful)[1:5,list(eruptLengthCurrent=eruptions,
                                 eruptLengthTwoPrior=rowShift(eruptions,-2), 
                                 eruptLengthThreeFuture=rowShift(eruptions,3))]
##   eruptLengthCurrent eruptLengthTwoPrior eruptLengthThreeFuture
##1:              3.600                  NA                  2.283
##2:              1.800                  NA                  4.533
##3:              3.333               3.600                     NA
##4:              2.283               1.800                     NA
##5:              4.533               3.333                     NA
  • This is a brilliant answer, I'm annoyed that I've already upvoted the other answers because this is a far more general answer. In fact, I'm going to use it in my geneorama package (if you don't mind). – geneorama Nov 3 '14 at 19:52
  • Sure, go for it. I was hoping to get some free time and submit it as a pull request to the data.table package, but alas... – dnlbrky Nov 3 '14 at 20:33
  • A similar function called shift has been added to data.table as of version 1.9.5. See the updated answer from @Arun. – dnlbrky Feb 19 '15 at 18:53
12

Based on @Steve Lianoglou 's comment above, why not just:

DT[, D:= C + c(NA, B[.I - 1]) ]
#    A  B   C   D
# 1: 1 10 100  NA
# 2: 2 20 200 210
# 3: 3 30 300 320
# 4: 4 40 400 430
# 5: 5 50 500 540

And avoid using seq_len or head or any other function.

  • 2
    Nice - however this would not work if you wanted to find the previous within a group. – Matthew Sep 2 '14 at 18:39
  • 1
    @Matthew you are right. If subsetting by group I would replace .I with seq_len(.N) – Gary Weissman Feb 15 '15 at 20:00
9

Following Arun's solution, a similar results can be obtained without referring to to .N

> DT[, D := C + c(NA, head(B, -1))][]
   A  B   C   D
1: 1 10 100  NA
2: 2 20 200 210
3: 3 30 300 320
4: 4 40 400 430
5: 5 50 500 540
  • Is there a reason to prefer one method to another? Or is it simply an aesthetic difference? – Corone Feb 4 '13 at 16:10
  • I think that in this scenario (i.e. where .N is readily available) it is mostly aesthetic choice. I am not aware of any important difference. – Ryogi Feb 4 '13 at 16:24
1

I added a padding argument and changed some names and called it shift. https://github.com/geneorama/geneorama/blob/master/R/shift.R

  • 1
    Thanks so much for the note. I'll be on the lookout for it, and most likely use it and deprecate my geneorama version. – geneorama Jan 9 '15 at 20:06
1

Here is my intuitive solution:

#create data frame
df <- data.frame(A=1:5, B=seq(10,50,10), C=seq(100,500, 100))`
#subtract the shift from num rows
shift  <- 1 #in this case the shift is 1
invshift <- nrow(df) - shift
#Now create the new column
df$D <- c(NA, head(df$B, invshift)+tail(df$C, invshift))`

Here invshift, the number of rows minus 1, is 4. nrow(df) provides you with the number of rows in a data frame or in a vector. Similarly, if you want to take still earlier values, subtract from nrow 2, 3, ...etc, and also put NA's accordingly at the beginning.

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