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I am working with an EF Code First project, and all is well. I have a simple Class, Customer. In my Customer Class I have a field I want to encrypt (Yes, I know I can encrypt at the DB level but requirements dictate I encrypt at the Domain/Code level), so I am hoping that I can do something like the following:

public class Customer
{
    public int CustomerID { get; set; }      
    public string FieldToEncrypt { get; set { _FieldToEncrypt = MyEncryptionFunction.Encrypt(); } }
}

However, I assume that if the setter has a definition, entity framework code first may ignore that property when generating the schema. So my question is, is there a way to do EF Code First with provided getters/setters, or should I move this functionality into a constructor? Should I override one of the methods/events that happens when the Context is saving, instead?

EDIT ********************

As a note, I am using DataService to transmit the data over an OData protocol service. This automatically generates insert/update/select methods. Some of the suggestions require creating a second property, but the DataService class does not seem to pass through NotMapped properties. This throws a bit of a kink into my earlier question.

3
  • If you're doing encryption on a string, I'd suggest putting it as close to the input as possible. i.e. Where you do FieldToEncrypt = "asdf"; (encryption handled in setter), change to FieldToEncrypt = MyEncryptionFunction.Encrypt("asdf");
    – Bob.
    Feb 4, 2013 at 20:41
  • 2
    Have you tried it? There are a number of similar answers on SO that suggest that this works out of the box in the way you are looking for. See stackoverflow.com/questions/11962532/… and stackoverflow.com/questions/8990319/…
    – Zeph
    Feb 4, 2013 at 20:46
  • The second link you provided appears to be closer to what I need. However, he's talking about 'not mapping' the field. I want the field to be mapped, still. I just want the mapped value to be transformed before the value is stuck in the database. I guess I have a deeper question, and that is: In EF Code First, does the code call the getters and setters before / after inserting?
    – Richthofen
    Feb 4, 2013 at 20:54

1 Answer 1

5
public class Customer 
{
    public int CustomerID { get; set; }        
    public string EncryptedField { get; private set; }

    [NotMapped]
    public string Field
    {
        get { return MyEncryptionFunction.Decrypt(EncryptedField); }
        set { EncryptedField = MyEncryptionFunction.Encrypt(value); }
    } 
}
5
  • Ok, but I am mentally trying to work out the GET vs SET. So when the Entity Framework attempts to write the data to the database, does it call the 'GET' on the object? If so, the data in the database would be decrypted then inserted into the database. In this example, I am worried the data is only encrypted in memory and not when persisted. I tried the SET statement and it worked surprisingly exactly how I wanted it to. What does the 'NotMapped' annotation provide? Does it tell the framework to not persist that column in the db? if so, it wouldn't work for my example.
    – Richthofen
    Feb 4, 2013 at 21:08
  • In this sample you will have only two columns in database: CustomerID and EncryptedField (with encrypted field value). Not encrypted data will not be stored anywhere - neither in database, nor in memory. NotMapped annotation tells EF to skip property and do not generate column in database for this property Feb 4, 2013 at 21:10
  • Ok. But instead of splitting this up into two fields, one notmapped and one mapped, can I just do this with one field, mapped?
    – Richthofen
    Feb 4, 2013 at 21:13
  • 1
    @Richthofen setter will be executed when reading data from database into your property. So, if you want to store encrypted data, think about what you will get in your field - data encrypted twice. Feb 4, 2013 at 21:24
  • Question updated; NotMapped causes some problems as I am using DataService<> to autogenerate a service based on my datacontext and DataService ignores NotMapped properties.
    – Richthofen
    Feb 4, 2013 at 21:46

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