6

EDIT: I have edited the post to clarify my question, now I myself, have more understanding.

I am essentially, as the title says, attempting to output console to my JTextArea in my GUI, whilst performing the tasks of the application.

Here is what I am currently doing:

public class TextAreaOutputStream extends OutputStream
{

    private final JTextArea textArea;

    private final StringBuilder sb = new StringBuilder();

    public TextAreaOutputStream(final JTextArea textArea)
    {
        this.textArea = textArea;
    }

    @Override
    public void flush()
    {
    }

    @Override
    public void close()
    {
    }

    @Override
    public void write(int b) throws IOException
    {

        if (b == '\r')
            return;

        if (b == '\n')
        {
            final String text = sb.toString() + "\n";
            SwingUtilities.invokeLater(new Runnable()
            {
                public void run()
                {
                    textArea.append(text);
                }
            });
            sb.setLength(0);
        }
        sb.append((char) b);
    }
}

The above will successfully re-direct System.out to my output stream above and therefore despatch an event to the EventQueue to update my GUI (JTextArea).

Here is the issue:

Currently using invokeLater() will as it says on the docs:

Causes runnable to have its run method called in the dispatch thread of the EventQueue. This will happen after all pending events are processed.

So what I actually want to do is perform my update to the GUI (call run()) before processing everything else in the EventQueue.

Is it possible to inject an event essentially into my EventQueue? Or can somebody point me to an decent tutorial on this area?

thanks,

1
  • "The solution above works in the sense that I get sysout to my JTextArea, however when I am attempting to do this in an actionPerformed(), I am not getting any output." And you are certain you pass all those if's ? There is no good reason why one System.out call would work and another fail
    – Robin
    Feb 5, 2013 at 13:39

5 Answers 5

12

The following example creates frame with text area and redirects System.out to it:

import java.awt.BorderLayout;
import java.awt.Container;
import java.io.IOException;
import java.io.OutputStream;
import java.io.PrintStream;

import javax.swing.JFrame;
import javax.swing.JScrollPane;
import javax.swing.JTextArea;
import javax.swing.SwingUtilities;

public class JTextAreaOutputStream extends OutputStream
{
    private final JTextArea destination;

    public JTextAreaOutputStream (JTextArea destination)
    {
        if (destination == null)
            throw new IllegalArgumentException ("Destination is null");

        this.destination = destination;
    }

    @Override
    public void write(byte[] buffer, int offset, int length) throws IOException
    {
        final String text = new String (buffer, offset, length);
        SwingUtilities.invokeLater(new Runnable ()
            {
                @Override
                public void run() 
                {
                    destination.append (text);
                }
            });
    }

    @Override
    public void write(int b) throws IOException
    {
        write (new byte [] {(byte)b}, 0, 1);
    }

    public static void main (String[] args) throws Exception
    {
        JTextArea textArea = new JTextArea (25, 80);

        textArea.setEditable (false);

        JFrame frame = new JFrame ("stdout");
        frame.setDefaultCloseOperation (JFrame.EXIT_ON_CLOSE);
        Container contentPane = frame.getContentPane ();
        contentPane.setLayout (new BorderLayout ());
        contentPane.add (
            new JScrollPane (
                textArea, 
                JScrollPane.VERTICAL_SCROLLBAR_ALWAYS, 
                JScrollPane.HORIZONTAL_SCROLLBAR_AS_NEEDED),
            BorderLayout.CENTER);
        frame.pack ();
        frame.setVisible (true);

        JTextAreaOutputStream out = new JTextAreaOutputStream (textArea);
        System.setOut (new PrintStream (out));

        while (true)
        {
            System.out.println ("Current time: " + System.currentTimeMillis ());
            Thread.sleep (1000L);
        }
    }
}
3
  • hmmm what is wrong with my approach? All that I can see here is you have just recreated my solution? Can you point out where it addresses my issue?
    – Joe
    Feb 5, 2013 at 11:57
  • 1
    Nothing wrong with sleeping on the Initial Thread, but one should build GUI components on the EDT.
    – trashgod
    Feb 5, 2013 at 12:01
  • There are several minor issues with your approach, i.e. you output each '\n' twice, but nothing that may lead to problem you described. Are you sure that !"".equals(targetFile.getText()) and checkBox.isSelected() are both true? Feb 5, 2013 at 13:31
5

Your error must lie somewhere else that you haven't shown us yet. Here is a very simple demo that works as expected with almost the same code as yours (I only fixed minor issues):

import java.awt.event.ActionEvent;
import java.awt.event.ActionListener;
import java.io.IOException;
import java.io.OutputStream;
import java.io.PrintStream;

import javax.swing.JFrame;
import javax.swing.JScrollPane;
import javax.swing.JTextArea;
import javax.swing.SwingUtilities;
import javax.swing.Timer;

public class TextAreaOutputStream extends OutputStream {

    private final JTextArea textArea;

    private final StringBuilder sb = new StringBuilder();

    public TextAreaOutputStream(final JTextArea textArea) {
        this.textArea = textArea;
    }

    @Override
    public void flush() {
    }

    @Override
    public void close() {
    }

    @Override
    public void write(int b) throws IOException {

        if (b == '\r') {
            return;
        }

        if (b == '\n') {
            final String text = sb.toString() + "\n";

            textArea.append(text);
            sb.setLength(0);
        } else {
            sb.append((char) b);
        }
    }

    public static void main(String[] args) {
        SwingUtilities.invokeLater(new Runnable() {

            @Override
            public void run() {
                JFrame frame = new JFrame(TextAreaOutputStream.class.getSimpleName());
                frame.setDefaultCloseOperation(JFrame.EXIT_ON_CLOSE);
                JTextArea ta = new JTextArea(24, 80);
                System.setOut(new PrintStream(new TextAreaOutputStream(ta)));
                frame.add(new JScrollPane(ta));
                frame.pack();
                frame.setVisible(true);
                System.out.println("Textarea console initiated");
                Timer t = new Timer(1000, new ActionListener() {

                    int count = 1;

                    @Override
                    public void actionPerformed(ActionEvent e) {
                        System.out.println("Outputting line " + count++ + " to the console. Working properly, no?");
                    }
                });
                t.start();
            }
        });
    }
}
4
  • The issue is my own stupidity and misunderstanding on invokeLater(). My solution is working, but not as I desire, i.e. My GUI is updated however not until after everything else in the EventQueue is processed - that being the ... in my snippet above. Which is not what I want.
    – Joe
    Feb 5, 2013 at 15:26
  • @buymypies Btw, JTextArea.append is Thread-safe, so there is no need to wrap it in an invokeLater(). Feb 5, 2013 at 15:35
  • Please see my edit of my question, hopefully I have made it clearer as to what I am trying to do.
    – Joe
    Feb 5, 2013 at 15:43
  • @buymypies 1) No need to wrap JTextArea.append in an invokeLater(). 2) If you are thinking about re-ordering events on the EventQueue, forget about it (it is not hard to do): this just means that you have a wrong design somewhere. If you need to execute lengthy operations, don't perform them on the EDT, but use instead a SwingWorker for that purpose. Feb 5, 2013 at 15:54
3

You might need to use PipedOutputStream... see the answers to the question here: How to redirect all console output to a Swing JTextArea/JTextPane with the right encoding?

Basically what this does is, it redirects the System.out to a buffer, from which, the program can read the output printed with System.out. This is called Piping

2

The best way to do this I have found is very simple and seems to work very nicely. I've used it for years with no issues.

JTextArea output = new JTextArea();
PrintStream out = new PrintStream(new OutputStream() {
@Override
    public void write(int b) throws IOException {
        output.append(""+(char)(b & 0xFF));
    }
});
System.setOut(out);
System.out.println("TEST");
0

If you want to see scrolling effect in Text Area, then instead of appending the output, you can put the new text in beginning. Example:

HttpURLConnection con = (HttpURLConnection) (new URL(url[0]).openConnection());
con.setInstanceFollowRedirects(false);
con.connect();
int responseCode = con.getResponseCode();
String location = con.getHeaderField("Location");
textArea.setText(url[0] +"," +responseCode+"," +location+"\n"+textArea.getText()); //new text is prefixed to the existing text
textArea.update(textArea.getGraphics());

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