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Information

I seem absolutely clueless as to how I should manage my component packages and install custom property editors. I have spent the last week or so looking at examples and tutorials, I must clearly be doing something wrong as my property editors never show up in the Object Inspector and I require step by step instructions to try and solve this frustration.

Component Package

I currently have one package, and it is set to designtime and runtime in the options. Added to this package are the units to my components (ie, MyButton, MyListBox etc) - Additionally I have a unit containing the RegisterComponents procedure. I can build and install this now, add my components to a new project and run them without any problems.

Adding a custom PropertyEditor

It gets tricky and confusing for me now that I want to introduce a property editor to my components from the package above.

TMyButton for example is a custom button with my own paint methods, it already has published properties to allow changing the appearance of the button - In addition there is also a published list to allow selecting preset appearance settings, example:

TMyButtonStyle = (bsStyle1, bsStyle2, bsStyle3)

I want to take away the list of preset styles and instead add a property to the Object Inspector called 'PresetStyles'. This property will be of paDialog, I want to a show a form where I can visually see the different button styles - a more graphical way of selecting a preset style then from a simple list.

Which packages do I need

If I understand, you need to split designtime packages and runtime packages?

Does this mean I need two register units, one for the components and one for the Property Editors?

I am not full sure how to manage this, as I said my current package is designtime and runtime, I am not sure what package type I should split it into. If I make a new designtime package for the Property Editors, and make the other package runtime only I lose the install button. Even writing this now is confusing me.

Installing the PropertyEditor

One of the articles I tried following was one from this page: http://www.delphisources.ru/pages/faq/master-delphi-7/content/LiB0097.html

The only thing I changed was add my own dialog form, and change the register code from:

RegisterPropertyEditor(TypeInfo(string), TMdSoundButton, 'SoundUp', TSoundProperty);

to

RegisterPropertyEditor(TypeInfo(string), TMyButton, 'PresetStyles', TSoundProperty);

I know it still says TSoundProperty, I just left it like that until I could get it working then I would change the class name.

Conclusion

What is the correct way of splitting/managing packages between actual components and the design side ie PropertyEditors?

The PropertyEditor never appears on TMyButton in the Object Inspector and I have a feeling it must be something to do with not configuring the packages correctly or something.

I would really appreciate some kind of assistance here, even a link to a really good tutorial guide or something as nothing I am doing seems to work, even using a lot of the examples are not working for me.

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I currently have one package, and it is set to designtime and runtime in the options.

To implement custom property/component editors, you MUST separate your code into two packages - one runtime only package containing just the implementation code for the components themselves, and one designtime only package that contains just the implementation code for the component registrations and custom editor(s). The designtime package needs to specify the runtime package, and the designide package, in its Requires list. The runtime package is what gets compiled into executables. The designtime package is what the IDE uses to get your components to appear in the Component Palette and Form Designer and interact with them.

Does this mean I need two register units, one for the components and one for the Property Editors?

No. The runtime package should have no registrations at all. That belongs in the designtime package instead. You can have a single Register() function in the designtime package that registers everything.

If I make a new designtime package for the Property Editors, and make the other package runtime only I lose the install button.

You cannot install a runtime package into the IDE, only a designtime package.

One of the articles I tried following was one from this page: http://www.delphisources.ru/pages/faq/master-delphi-7/content/LiB0097.html

The only thing I changed was add my own dialog form, and change the register code from:

RegisterPropertyEditor(TypeInfo(string), TMdSoundButton, 'SoundUp', TSoundProperty);

to

RegisterPropertyEditor(TypeInfo(string), TMyButton, 'PresetStyles', TSoundProperty);

Does your TMyButton component actually define a PresetStyles property that is a String type? You cannot define a property editor for a property that does not exist.

Without knowing exactly how your PresetStyles property is implemented in the component itself and what it represents, it probably does not make much sense to invoke a popup Dialog for a String property (except maybe for things like filenames and such). Based on your description, it probably makes more sense to implement a component editor instead of a property editor, and leave your existing TMyButtonStyle property alone to use the IDE's default editor for enum properties. To invoke your popup dialog, the component editor would allow the user to right-click on the component itself and choose "Edit" (or whatever other string value you decide to name it) from the popup menu, or just double-click on the component, in the Form Designer. You can then display and edit the component as desired, and assign any changes to the component when the dialog is closed.

The PropertyEditor never appears on TMyButton in the Object Inspector and I have a feeling it must be something to do with not configuring the packages correctly or something.

It is hard to know for sure since you did not show any of your actual code yet.

| improve this answer | |
  • I didn't post any code because it was essentially the same as from the link in the question I posted, only slightly modified. The major concern I had was working with the packages correctly, Matthias Alleweldt pretty much answered that and the property editor part, that and with NGLN's post and yours I understand a lot more the concepts of it all. – user1175743 Feb 5 '13 at 19:16
  • The link in the question does not show any component code, only the editor code, so it is hard to match up if the code you are actually using really matches your actual component code. – Remy Lebeau Feb 5 '13 at 22:49
  • I think the biggest issue with the Property Editors - and I feel stupid for not realising it is I was trying to register them for non existing properties, ie I thought registering a property editor would magically create a new property. That is why they never showed up for me, I need to register property editors for existing published properties. – user1175743 Feb 6 '13 at 10:41
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    Normal property editors do require actual properties, yes. However, IIRC there is a lower-level way to "create" properties at design-time as well. I don't recall the details offhand, though (and I am not referring to overriding TComponent.DefineProperties(), which only applies to custom DFM streaming). – Remy Lebeau Feb 6 '13 at 21:28
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If I understand, you need to split designtime packages and runtime packages?

Does this mean I need two register units, one for the components and one for the Property Editors?

No. One registration unit that registers both the components ánd the property editors is enough, as long as that registration unit isn't used at runtime (which normally isn't). This applies to the unit containing the property editor too. Prevent using DesignEditors.pas at runtime, and then you're fine.

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  • I will remember to keep DesignEditors from been used at runtime thanks – user1175743 Feb 5 '13 at 16:21
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Component Package

It is OK to have one package for both today. In the past it made sense to split them if an application was distributed with runtime packages to reduce the total size. I like to split them up to now to seperate the implementation and the design interface.

Which packages do I need

If you have two packages the runtime packages must be referenced in 'Requires' in the design time package. Therefore you only have to register the design time package. The runtime package ist implicit loaded into the IDE. In your case with one package you have to register this.

Installing the PropertyEditor

There is something wrong with the first parameter. It must be the typeinfo of the property.

RegisterPropertyEditor(TypeInfo(TMyButtonStyle), TMdSoundButton, 'PresetStyles', TSoundProperty);

TSoundProperty should be a descand from TEnumProperty.

Conclusion

Go on with one package. The property should appear with the changed code. If not check that the property is not readonly.

| improve this answer | |
  • I followed your tips and it never worked, so I uninstalled my component and closed/reopened the IDE, rebuilt and installed the package and now it magically works. Thanks for your answer this was really bothering me a lot! – user1175743 Feb 5 '13 at 16:20
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    -1. It is NOT OK to have one package for both designtime and runtime code when custom editors are involved. In fact, it is forbidden, and has been since around D6. The designtime libraries are not allowed to be compiled into runtime executables. RegisterComponents() is OK by itself, because it is implemented in a runtime package, but RegisterPropertyEditor() is not. You MUST separate your runtime and designtime code, and the IDE enforces that. – Remy Lebeau Feb 5 '13 at 16:34
  • Thanks Remy to make this clear. It was my practice for a long time and now I know that I have to. – Matthias Alleweldt Feb 5 '13 at 16:40
  • I think I will split the packages then with the advice shown. – user1175743 Feb 5 '13 at 19:19
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    This answer is simply wrong. Can't it be fixed. Or can't the accept be moved to an accurate answer. – David Heffernan Feb 5 '13 at 21:53

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