125

In JavaScript, I'm telling the browser to do something if the window size is greater than 500px. I do it like so:

if (windowsize > 500) {
    // do this
}

This works great, but I would like to apply this same method, but with a range of numbers. So I would like to tell my browser to do stuff if the window size is between 500px and 600px. I know this wouldn't work, but here is how I imagined it:

if (windowsize > 500-600) {
    // do this
}

Is this even possible, within JavaScript?

  • 9
    Seems a bit harsh to close this question. Can I vote to reopen it. It is well-written and gives sample code. – Caltor Aug 27 '15 at 16:06
  • Surely the more correct check would be if ( windowsize >= 500 && windowsize <= 600 ) or if ( !(windowsize < 500 || windowsize > 600) ) – SPlatten Sep 3 at 11:08
205

Tests whether windowsize is greater than 500 and lesser than 600 meaning that neither values 500 or 600 itself will result in the condition becoming true.

if (windowsize > 500 && windowsize < 600) {
  // ...
}
  • 1
    thanks undefined, just to confirm this will do what I want within the browser when the window size is greater then 500px and less than 600px, essentially functioning within the range of 500-600px only, correct? (I'm not too good with this stuff lol) – Dyck Feb 5 '13 at 23:14
  • 1
    @Dyck Yes, it does so :), note that jQuery is only a JavaScript library. – undefined Feb 5 '13 at 23:17
  • 7
    Mind that this condition is only true when windowsize is at least 501px and at most 599px. 500px and 600px are excluded. Add equality to comparisons if you want inclusive of these values. – Robert Koritnik Oct 7 '15 at 14:05
  • 3
    Just a detail, but is more readable the following way: if(500 < windowsize && windowsize < 600) – Giovanni Benussi Jun 17 '16 at 14:45
104

I had a moment, so, although you've already accepted an answer, I thought I'd contribute the following:

Number.prototype.between = function(a, b) {
  var min = Math.min.apply(Math, [a, b]),
    max = Math.max.apply(Math, [a, b]);
  return this > min && this < max;
};

var windowSize = 550;

console.log(windowSize.between(500, 600));

JS Fiddle demo.

Or, if you'd prefer to have the option to check a number is in the defined range including the end-points:

Number.prototype.between = function(a, b, inclusive) {
  var min = Math.min.apply(Math, [a, b]),
    max = Math.max.apply(Math, [a, b]);
  return inclusive ? this >= min && this <= max : this > min && this < max;
};

var windowSize = 500;

console.log(windowSize.between(500, 603, true));

JS Fiddle demo.

Edited to add a minor amendment to the above, given that – as noted in the comments –

Function.prototype.apply() is slow! Besides calling it when you have a fixed amount of arguments is pointless…

it was worth removing the use of Function.prototype.apply(), which yields the amended versions of the above methods, firstly without the 'inclusive' option:

Number.prototype.between = function(a, b) {
  var min = Math.min(a, b),
    max = Math.max(a, b);

  return this > min && this < max;
};

var windowSize = 550;

console.log(windowSize.between(500, 600));

JS Fiddle demo.

And with the 'inclusive' option:

Number.prototype.between = function(a, b, inclusive) {
  var min = Math.min(a, b),
    max = Math.max(a, b);

  return inclusive ? this >= min && this <= max : this > min && this < max;
}

var windowSize = 500;

console.log(windowSize.between(500, 603, true));

JS Fiddle demo.

References:

  • 6
    why use apply instead of calling directly like Main.min(a,b)? Function.prototype.apply is slow! Besides calling it when you have a fixed amount of arguments is pointless. – Steel Brain May 17 '15 at 1:36
  • I'm going to add this to my default toolbox - very handy and thanks for this contribution! – SidOfc Jun 10 '15 at 12:48
  • @SteelBrain: you have a point! I've updated the answer to reflect that, though I suspect that I had - initially - a reason for using Function.prototype.apply(), but I can't think what it was, or might have been. – David Thomas Jun 10 '15 at 14:54
  • 6
    it's MUCH better to create a function that doesn't modify the Number object. This is an anti-pattern and will come and bite you if ECMA standards change to include a Number.between() function, or if another library or another piece of code defines Number.prototype.between elsewhere with a different definition. Instead, make a helper function and use that! – Monarch Wadia Jan 25 '17 at 20:19
  • 2
    @MonarchWadia While your point makes sense that modifying/extending native objects is bad practice, I feel it's a bit redundant having this preached everywhere (no offense). I can't count the times I've seen "don't modify native objects". For me, this is like someone selling household knives warning the buyer about the possible dangers of the knife every single time he/she sells one like its the seller's responsibility if there's any harm. The dangers should be common knowledge. It should be up to the user if he/she ignores them or not. – akinuri Jun 19 '18 at 6:45
70

I prefer to put the variable on the inside to give an extra hint that the code is validating my variable is between a range values

if (500 < size && size < 600) { doStuff(); }
  • 10
    i like this style! will adapt that :) – Kaii Sep 19 '13 at 20:43
  • 2
    This is my preference, since it's closer to python's min < testval < max syntax – daveruinseverything Feb 15 '17 at 22:52
23

It's an old question, however might be useful for someone like me.

lodash has _.inRange() function https://lodash.com/docs/4.17.4#inRange

Example:

_.inRange(3, 2, 4);
// => true

Please note that this method utilizes the Lodash utility library, and requires access to an installed version of Lodash.

  • 2
    Please be aware than the end value is not included. eg. _.inRange(10, 0, 10) // => false – Lucio Mar 29 at 0:56
  • As the OP limited the question scope to Javascript, it's worth noting that this method utilizes the Lodash utility library, and requires access to an installed version of Lodash. – Chaya Cooper Sep 20 at 1:11
0

I just implemented this bit of jQuery to show and hide bootstrap modal values. Different fields are displayed based on the value range of a users textbox entry.

$(document).ready(function () {
    jQuery.noConflict();
    var Ammount = document.getElementById('Ammount');

    $("#addtocart").click(function () {

            if ($(Ammount).val() >= 250 && $(Ammount).val() <= 499) {
                {
                    $('#myModal').modal();
                    $("#myModalLabelbronze").show();
                    $("#myModalLabelsilver").hide();
                    $("#myModalLabelgold").hide();
                    $("#myModalPbronze").show();
                    $("#myModalPSilver").hide();
                    $("#myModalPGold").hide();
                }
            }
    });
  • 6
    Using jQuery for trivial functions was in 2013 maybe an option but isn't today – mgamsjager Jun 9 '16 at 8:40
  • 3
    True but I am afraid people will still use it today – mgamsjager Jul 11 '16 at 12:50
  • 1
    Out of curiosity: why is jQuery worse to use for trivial functions now than then? – Julix Oct 14 '16 at 0:44
  • 2
    @Julix mostly performance, albeit negligible in this case. The general point would be "don't use jQuery when it is not necessary" but these comments are not the place to (re)start the debate. have fun with this though :) i.stack.imgur.com/sGhaO.gif – Luca Oct 18 '16 at 15:43
  • This is just an implementation of the solution. OP already has access to the values. So jQuery $().val() is irrelevant and not necessary. But again, in the original version of the question, OP mentions jQuery, for a simple arithmetic check. (sigh) That's the first mistake. – akinuri Jun 19 '18 at 6:55

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