65

I'm attempting to run some fairly deep recursive code in R and it keeps giving me this error:

Error: C stack usage is too close to the limit

My output from CStack_info() is:

Cstack_info()
    size    current  direction eval_depth 
67108864       8120          1          2 

I have plenty of memory on my machine, I'm just trying to figure out how I can increase the CStack for R.

EDIT: Someone asked for a reproducible example. Here's some basic sample code that causes the problem. Running f(1,1) a few times you'll get the error. Note that I've already set --max-ppsize = 500000 and options(expressions=500000) so if you don't set those you might get an error about one of those two things instead. As you can see, the recursion can go pretty deep here and I've got no idea how to get it to work consistently. Thanks.

f <- function(root=1,lambda=1) {
    x <- c(0,1);
    prob <- c(1/(lambda+1),lambda/(lambda+1));
        repeat {
      if(root == 0) {
        break;
      }
      else {
        child <- sample(x,2,replace=TRUE,prob);
        if(child[1] == 0 && child[2] == 0) {
          break;
        }
        if(child[1] == 1) {
          child[1] <- f(root=child[1],lambda);
        }
        if(child[2] == 1 && child[1] == 0) {
          child[2] <- f(root=child[2],lambda);
        }
      }
      if(child[1] == 0 && child[2] == 0) {
        break;
      }
      if(child[1] == 1 || child[2] == 1) {
        root <- sample(x,1,replace=TRUE,prob);
      }
        }
    return(root)
}
  • This question suggests perhaps options(expressions = somethinglarge) – mnel Feb 6 '13 at 0:18
  • @mnel The expression nesting depth, the pointer protection stack, and the C stack are three separate (but related) things. – zwol Feb 6 '13 at 0:21
  • Thanks so much for your prompt response, Zack. I think that your answer may be for a Linux OS though? I'm currently running Windows 7 64 bit, does that change things at all? Thanks again for any help. – user2045093 Feb 6 '13 at 1:31
  • 1
    Googling the error message shows that in the past this has usually been an error in user code, so you should probably reduce your problem to a simple reproducible example and post that here. – Martin Morgan Feb 6 '13 at 2:52
  • 1
    I'm not sure there is an error in the code at all. This is simply a case of probabilities that could in theory end up with infinite recursion. f(1,1) is basically flipping a coin. It could keep coming up heads forever. For a condition where the level of recursion is unknown and unbounded, you are better off coming up with something more iterative, using memoization of prior sample() results to inform future operations. Then the only thing you risk is running out of vector memory, or disk, depending on where you are storing your backlog of results. Recursion can be expensive and brittle. – Robert Casey Mar 10 '15 at 20:08

10 Answers 10

49

The stack size is an operating system parameter, adjustable per-process (see setrlimit(2)). You can't adjust it from within R as far as I can tell, but you can adjust it from the shell before starting R, with the ulimit command. It works like this:

$ ulimit -s # print default
8192
$ R --slave -e 'Cstack_info()["size"]'
   size 
8388608

8388608 = 1024 * 8192; R is printing the same value as ulimit -s, but in bytes instead of kilobytes.

$ ulimit -s 16384 # enlarge stack limit to 16 megs
$ R --slave -e 'Cstack_info()["size"]'
    size 
16777216 

To make a permanent adjustment to this setting, add the ulimit command to your shell startup file, so it's executed every time you log in. I can't give more specific directions than that, because it depends on exactly which shell you have and stuff. I also don't know how to do it for logging into a graphical environment (which will be relevant if you're not running R inside a terminal window).

  • 11
    ...or just set it to unlimited. – Paul Hiemstra Feb 7 '13 at 6:42
  • 1
    The RAppArmor package offers an interface to setrlimit(2). This functionality may become available in the ulimit package at some point. – krlmlr Jul 3 '16 at 17:59
  • 2
    This function no longer exists in the RAppArmor package. Any ideas where it went? – Deleet Jul 20 '17 at 21:26
  • 1
    Changing the limit will not resolve this. A recursive function will simply continue to run until the higher limit is reached. – Tom Kelly Dec 19 '18 at 12:34
  • 1
    @user5783745 see edit. – zwol Apr 29 at 11:35
16

I suspect that, regardless of stack limit, you'll end up with recursions that are too deep. For instance, with lambda = Inf, f(1) leads to an immediate recursion, indefinitely. The depth of the recursion seems to be a random walk, with some probability r of going deeper, 1 - r of finishing the current recursion. By the time you've hit the stack limit, you've made a large number of steps 'deeper'. This implies that r > 1 / 2, and the very large majority of time you'll just continue to recurse.

Also, it seems like it is almost possible to derive an analytic or at least numerical solution even in the face of infinite recursion. One can define p as the probability that f(1) == 1, write implicit expressions for the 'child' states after a single iteration, and equate these with p, and solve. p can then be used as the chance of success in a single draw from a binomial distribution.

  • here is actually hidden correct answer - make sure you don't get that deep in recusion... – Kamil S Jaron May 12 '15 at 17:42
8

This happened to me for a completely different reason. I accidentally created a superlong string while combining two columns:

output_table_subset = mutate(big_data_frame,
     combined_table = paste0(first_part, second_part, col = "_"))

instead of

output_table_subset = mutate(big_data_frame,
     combined_table = paste0(first_part, second_part, sep = "_"))

Took me for ever to figure it out as I never expected the paste to have caused the problem.

  • Same here, but I was doing a summarize. I had it like this: summarize( states = paste0(state,collapse=', ') ). When I should have done something like: summarize( states = paste0(sort(unique(state)),collapse=', ') ). Goal was to get a comma separated list of unique states available for each subgroup. – Richard DiSalvo Aug 24 '17 at 23:24
5

This error is not due to memory it is due to recursion. A function is calling itself. To illustrate the point, here is a minimal example of 2 functions that call each other:

change_to_factor <- function(x){
  x <- change_to_character(x)
  as.factor(x)
} 

change_to_character <- function(x){
  x <- change_to_factor(x)
  as.character(x)
}

change_to_character("1")

Error: C stack usage 7971600 is too close to the limit

The functions will continue to call each other recursively and will theoretically never complete. It is only checks within your system that prevent this from occurring indefinitely and consuming all of the compute resources of your machine. You need to alter the functions to ensure that they don't call itself (or each other) recursively.

4

I encountered the same problem of receiving the "C stack usage is too close to the limit" error (albeit for another application than the one stated by user2045093 above). I tried zwol's proposal but it didn't work out.

To my own surprise, I could solve the problem by installing the newest version of R for OS X (currently: version 3.2.3) as well as the newest version of R Studio for OS X (currently: 0.99.840), since I am working with R Studio.

Hopefully, this may be of some help to you as well.

  • I switched to a higher version of R. It worked once, but the error reappeared and is consistent now. Help! – murphy1310 Jul 19 '18 at 14:41
1

One issue here can be that you're calling f inside itself

plop <- function(a = 2){
  pouet <- sample(a)
  plop(pouet)
}
plop()
Erreur : évaluations trop profondément imbriquées : récursion infinie / options(expressions=) ?
Erreur pendant l'emballage (wrapup) : évaluations trop profondément imbriquées : récursion infinie / options(expressions=) ?
1

For everyone's information, I am suddenly running into this with R 3.6.1 on Windows 7 (64-bit). It was not a problem before, and now stack limits seem to be popping up everywhere, when I try to "save(.)" data or even do a "save.image(.)". It's like the serialization is blowing these stacks away.

I am seriously considering dropping back to 3.6.0. Didn't happen there.

0

As Martin Morgan wrote... The problem is that you get too deep inside of recursion. If the recursion does not converge at all, you need to break it by your own. I hope this code is going to work, because It is not tested. However at least point should be clear here.

f <- function(root=1,lambda=1,depth=1) {
 if(depth > 256){
  return(NA)
 }
 x <- c(0,1);
 prob <- c(1/(lambda+1),lambda/(lambda+1));
 repeat {
  if(root == 0) {
    break;
  } else {
   child <- sample(x,2,replace=TRUE,prob);
   if(child[1] == 0 && child[2] == 0) {
     break;
   }
   if(child[1] == 1) {
     child[1] <- f(root=child[1],lambda,depth+1);
   }
   if(child[2] == 1 && child[1] == 0) {
     child[2] <- f(root=child[2],lambda,depth+1);
   }
  }
  if(child[1] == NA | child[2] == NA){
   return NA;
  }
  if(child[1] == 0 && child[2] == 0) {
    break;
  }
  if(child[1] == 1 || child[2] == 1) {
    root <- sample(x,1,replace=TRUE,prob);
  }
 }
 return(root)
}
0

Another way to cause the same problem:

library(debug)
mtrace(lapply)

The recursive call isn't as obvious here.

0

If you're using plot_ly check which columns you are passing. It seems that for POSIXdt/ct columns, you have to use as.character() before passing to plotly or you get this exception!

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