126

I'm working on an ASP.NET MVC 4 app. This app has a basic form. The model for my form looks like the following:

public class MyModel
{
    public string Name { get; set; }
    public bool Remember { get; set; }
}

In my form, I have the following HTML.

<input id="Name" name="Name" type="text" value="@Model.Name" />
<input id="Remember" name="Remember" type="checkbox" value="@Model.Remember" />
<label for="Remember">&nbsp;Remember Me?</label>

When I post the form, the Remember value in the model is always false. However, the Name property in the model has a value. I've tested this by setting a breakpoint in the following:

[HttpPost]
public ActionResult MyAction(MyModel model)
{
  Console.WriteLine(model.Remember.ToString());
}

I can't figure it out. Why isn't the Checkbox value getting set?

3
  • Does it get posted with the proper value? Can you check that using fiddler? Also, I don't know if/how the value of checkbox translates to bool. – shahkalpesh Feb 6 '13 at 13:55
  • This gets posted as "on" or "off" to the form. This apparently doesn't bind right. I made a stupid enum to avoid this. – Yablargo Jan 28 '15 at 22:15
  • @Yablargo, you don't need the enum. Just add value="true" to the input tag. And use a hidden with value="false" as shown below. – sympatric greg May 13 '15 at 22:36

18 Answers 18

219
@Html.EditorFor(x => x.Remember)

Will generate:

<input id="Remember" type="checkbox" value="true" name="Remember" />
<input type="hidden" value="false" name="Remember" />

How does it work:

  • If checkbox remains unchecked, the form submits only the hidden value (false)
  • If checked, then the form submits two fields (false and true) and MVC sets true for the model's bool property

<input id="Remember" name="Remember" type="checkbox" value="@Model.Remember" />

This will always send the default value, if checked.

9
  • 7
    Hi, this behavious causes my model to fail validations as it doesn't seem to be able to figure out how to turn the [true, false] into a single boolean value. How do you work around this? – Obi Jun 17 '13 at 12:17
  • @ObiOnuorah What construction are you using? Helper OR hard-coded html markup? – webdeveloper Jun 18 '13 at 13:07
  • 5
    Html.EditorFor or Html.CheckBoxFor either gives the same result – Obi Jun 18 '13 at 13:47
  • 3
    If formCollection is used, then the string returned for the checkbox as the result is: "true,false". How do you parse this? Is Replace() the only option? – Jo Smo Jul 4 '15 at 21:23
  • 7
    If you're adding your own checkboxes manually, then the key part is that value should be set to "true", otherwise the default value returned by the form will be "on" and "on" can't be bound to a bool which needs true/false. (You might see a validation error that the value "on" isn't valid for field.) – Greg Jan 6 '17 at 16:17
72

Since you are using Model.Name to set the value. I assume you are passing an empty view model to the View.

So the value for Remember is false, and sets the value on the checkbox element to false. This means that when you then select the checkbox, you are posting the value "false" with the form. When you don't select it, it doesn't get posted, so the model defaults to false. Which is why you are seeing a false value in both cases.

The value is only passed when you check the select box. To do a checkbox in Mvc use

@Html.CheckBoxFor(x => x.Remember)

or if you don't want to bind the model to the view.

@Html.CheckBox("Remember")

Mvc does some magic with a hidden field to persist values when they are not selected.

Edit, if you really have an aversion to doing that and want to generate the element yourself, you could do.

<input id="Remember" name="Remember" type="checkbox" value="true" @(Model.Remember ? "checked=\"checked\"" : "") />
4
  • 2
    The @Html.CheckboxFor code should actually be @Html.CheckBoxFor – fujiiface Oct 14 '16 at 1:59
  • Just a quick one how would you use @(Model.Remember ? "checked=\"checked\"" : "") on a radio button? or is that not possible – Izzy Apr 18 '17 at 14:19
  • With that option you are just manipulating the HTML directly, a radio button is just type="radio", and selecting the one you want selected in the HTML is the same as above, checked="checked". The difference being you will have multiple <input /> elements with the same name. You need to work out which one of those to apply the extra HTML to. – Dan Saltmer Apr 18 '17 at 16:31
  • @Html.CheckBoxFor(x => x.Remember) this worked for me – JustLearning Jun 15 '17 at 15:42
15

Use only this

$("input[type=checkbox]").change(function () {
    if ($(this).prop("checked")) {
        $(this).val(true);
    } else {
        $(this).val(false);
    }
});
1
  • Or: $(this).val($(this).is(":checked")); – Norman Jul 14 '17 at 4:46
5

Instead of

 <input id="Remember" name="Remember" type="checkbox" value="@Model.Remember" />

use:

 @Html.EditorFor(x => x.Remember)

That will give you a checkbox specifically for Remember

4

Okay, the checkbox is a little bit weird. When you use Html helper, it generates two checkbox inputs on the markup, and both of them get passed in as a name-value pair of IEnumerable if it is checked.

If it is not checked on the markup, it gets passed in only the hidden input which has value of false.

So for example on the markup you have:

      @Html.CheckBox("Chbxs") 

And in the controller action (make sure the name matches the checkbox param name on the controller):

      public ActionResult Index(string param1, string param2,
      string param3, IEnumerable<bool> Chbxs)

Then in the controller you can do some stuff like:

      if (Chbxs != null && Chbxs.Count() == 2)
        {
            checkBoxOnMarkup = true;
        }
        else
        {
            checkBoxOnMarkup = false;
        }

I know this is not an elegant solution. Hope someone here can give some pointers.

0
3

To convert a value returned from a check box in a form to a Boolean property I used the ValueProviderResult's in build converter in a custom ModelBinder.

ValueProviderResult cbValue = bindingContext.ValueProvider.GetValue("CheckBoxName");
bool value = (bool)cbValue.ConvertTo(typeof(bool));
3

If working with FormCollection rather than model, the assignment can be as simple as:

MyModel.Remember = fields["Remember"] != "false";
0
2

I ran into a similar issue and was able to get the checkbox value back by using a checkbox, hiddenfor and little JQuery like so:

@Html.CheckBox("isPreferred", Model.IsPreferred)
@Html.HiddenFor(m => m.IsPreferred)

<script>

    $("#isPreferred").change(function () {

        $("#IsPreferred").val($("#isPreferred").val());

    })

</script>
2

This has been a major pain and feels like it should be simpler. Here's my setup and solution.

I'm using the following HTML helper:

@Html.CheckBoxFor(model => model.ActiveFlag)

Then, in the controller, I am checking the form collection and processing accordingly:

bool activeFlag = collection["ActiveFlag"] == "false" ? false : true;
[modelObject].ActiveFlag = activeFlag;
1
  • Agreed, I made this even shorter as user.IsActive = fc["IsActive"] != "false"; I still feel dirty for doing a string comparison on it. – WildJoe Nov 9 '18 at 0:11
2

If you really want to use plain HTML (for whatever reason) and not the built-in HtmlHelper extensions, you can do it this way.

Instead of

<input id="Remember" name="Remember" type="checkbox" value="@Model.Remember" />

try using

<input id="Remember" name="Remember" type="checkbox" value="true" @(Model.Remember ? "checked" : "") />

Checkbox inputs in HTML work so that when they're checked, they send the value, and when they're not checked, they don't send anything at all (which will cause ASP.NET MVC to fallback to the default value of the field, false). Also, the value of the checkbox in HTML can be anything not just true/false, so if you really wanted, you can even use a checkbox for a string field in your model.

If you use the built-in Html.RenderCheckbox, it actually outputs two inputs: checkbox and a hidden field so that a false value is sent when the checkbox is unchecked (not just nothing). That may cause some unexpected situations, like this:

1

I just ran into this (I can't believe it doesn't bind on/off!)

Anyways!

<input type="checkbox" name="checked" />

Will Post a value of "on" or "off".

This WONT bind to a boolean, but you can do this silly workaround!

 public class MyViewModel
 {
     /// <summary>
     /// This is a really dumb hack, because the form post sends "on" / "off"
     /// </summary>                    
     public enum Checkbox
     {
        on = 1,
        off = 0
     }
     public string Name { get; set; }
     public Checkbox Checked { get; set; }
}
1
@Html.EditorFor(x => x.ShowComment)


$(function () {
        // set default value to control on document ready instead of 'on'/'off' 
        $("input[type='checkbox'][name='ShowComment']").val(@Model.ShowComment.ToString().ToLower());
    });

    $("#ShowComment").change(function() {
        // this block sets value to checkbox control for "true" / "false"

        var chkVal = $("input[type='checkbox'][name='ShowComment']").val();
        if (chkVal == 'false') $("input[type='checkbox'][name='ShowComment']").val(true);
        else $("input[type='checkbox'][name='ShowComment']").val(false);

    });
1
  • 3
    Hello Surendran and welcome to Stack Overflow. When you include code, please format it for readability. But more importantly, it's crucial to explain why the included code addresses the OP's question. – Alex A. Feb 2 '15 at 16:15
1

For the MVC using Model. Model:

public class UserInfo
{
    public string UserID { get; set; }
    public string UserName { get; set; }
    public string Password { get; set; }
    public bool RememberMe { get; set; }
}

HTML:

<input type="checkbox" value="true" id="checkbox1" name="RememberMe" checked="@Model.RememberMe"/>
<label for="checkbox1"></label>

In [HttpPost] function, we can get its properties.

[HttpPost]
public ActionResult Login(UserInfo user)
{
   //...
   return View(user);
}
0
0

For multiple checkbox with same name... Code to remove unnecessary false :

List<string> d_taxe1 = new List<string>(Request.Form.GetValues("taxe1"));
d_taxe1 = form_checkbox.RemoveExtraFalseFromCheckbox(d_taxe1);

Function

public class form_checkbox
{

    public static List<string> RemoveExtraFalseFromCheckbox(List<string> val)
    {
        List<string> d_taxe1_list = new List<string>(val);

        int y = 0;

        foreach (string cbox in val)
        {

            if (val[y] == "false")
            {
                if (y > 0)
                {
                    if (val[y - 1] == "true")
                    {
                        d_taxe1_list[y] = "remove";
                    }
                }

            }

            y++;
        }

        val = new List<string>(d_taxe1_list);

        foreach (var del in d_taxe1_list)
            if (del == "remove") val.Remove(del);

        return val;

    }      



}

Use it :

int x = 0;
foreach (var detail in d_prix){
factured.taxe1 = (d_taxe1[x] == "true") ? true : false;
x++;
}
0
public ActionResult Index(string username, string password, string rememberMe)
{
   if (!string.IsNullOrEmpty(username))
   {
      bool remember = bool.Parse(rememberMe);
      //...
   }
   return View();
}
0

Modify Remember like this

public class MyModel
{
    public string Name { get; set; }
    public bool? Remember { get; set; }
}

Use nullable bool in controller and fallback to false on null like this

[HttpPost]
public ActionResult MyAction(MyModel model)
{
    model.Remember = model.Remember ?? false;
    Console.WriteLine(model.Remember.ToString());
}
0

In my case I was not setting the model property "Remember" in the get method. Check your logic in the controller. You may be doing the same. I hope this help!

0

I read through the other answers and wasn't quite getting it to work - so here's the solution I ended up with.

My form uses the Html.EditorFor(e => e.Property) to generate the checkbox, and using FormCollection in the controller, this passes a string value of 'true,false' in the controller.

When I'm handling the results I use a loop to cycle through them - I also use an InfoProperty instance to represent the current model value being assessed from the form.

So instead I just check if the string returned starts with the word 'true' and then set a boolean variable to true and pass that into the return model.

if (KeyName.EndsWith("OnOff"))
{
    // set on/off flags value to the model instance
    bool keyTrueFalse = false;
    if(values[KeyName].StartsWith("true"))
    {
        keyTrueFalse = true;
    }
    infoProperty.SetValue(processedInfo, keyTrueFalse);
}

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