I want to store a 64bit (8 byte) big integer to a nodejs buffer object in big endian format.

The problem about this task is that nodejs buffer only supports writing 32bit integers as maximum (with buf.write32UInt32BE(value, offset)). So I though why can't we just split the 64bit integer?

var buf = new Buffer(8);

buf.fill(0) // clear all bytes of the buffer
console.log(buf); // outputs <Buffer 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00>

var int = 0xffff; // as dezimal: 65535

buf.write32UInt32BE(0xff, 4); // right the first part of the int
console.log(buf); // outputs <Buffer 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 ff>

buf.write32UInt32BE(0xff, 0); // right the second part of the int
console.log(buf); // outputs <Buffer 00 00 00 ff 00 00 00 ff>

var bufInt = buf.read32UInt32BE(0) * buf.read32UInt32BE(4);
console.log(bufInt); // outputs 65025

As you see this nearly works. The problem is just splitting the 64bit integer and finding the missing 510 at reading it. Would somebody mind to show the solutions about these two issues?

up vote 7 down vote accepted

I think what you are looking for is:

var bufInt = (buf.readUInt32BE(0) << 8) + buf.readUInt32BE(4);

Shift the first number by 8 bits and add (instead of multiplying), wich returns 65535


EDIT

Another way to write would be:

var buf = new Buffer(8);
buf.fill(0);

var i = 0xCDEF; // 52719 in decimal

buf.writeUInt32BE(i >> 8, 0); //write the high order bits (shifted over)
buf.writeUInt32BE(i & 0x00ff, 4); //write the low order bits

console.log(buf); //displays: <Buffer 00 00 00 cd 00 00 00 ef>

var bufInt = (buf.readUInt32BE(0) << 8) + buf.readUInt32BE(4);
console.log(bufInt); //displays: 52719
  • yes this would solve the reading issue but what is about splitting 0xffff into 0xff, 0xff? – bodokaiser Feb 6 '13 at 14:17
  • @kyogron see my edit. remember that shifting is weird in javascript, it only works on 32-bits. I don't think this would work with a number who's value can't be represented by 32-bits. – Chad Feb 6 '13 at 16:46
  • 3
    @Chad This will not work for full 64-bit values. Your shifts are off also. You would need to shift by 32, not 8, which JS cannot do. – loganfsmyth Feb 6 '13 at 17:04
  • @Chad To clarify, that will work for the 16-bit value he put in his question, but not for general case. You are also wasting space using a Buffer with 8 bytes to store 2 bytes. – loganfsmyth Feb 6 '13 at 17:14
  • @loganfsmyth I said as much about the 64-bit values, and I completely agree about the buffer space, I am just going off the example he gave. – Chad Feb 6 '13 at 18:01

Reading and writings UINT numbers up to Number.MAX_SAFE_INTEGER.

This works in node.js only, is not portable on browser side.

function uintToBase62(n) {
  if (n < 0) throw 'unsupported negative integer';

  let uintBuffer;
  if (n < 0x7FFFFFFF) {
    uintBuffer = new Buffer(4);
    uintBuffer.writeUInt32BE(n, 0);
  } else {
    // `~~` double bitwise operator
    // The most practical way of utilizing the power of this operator is to use it as a replacement
    // for Math.floor() function as double bitwise NOT performs the same operation a lot quicker.
    // You can use it, to convert any floating point number to a integer without performance overkill
    // that comes with Math.floor(). Additionally, when you care about minification of your code,
    // you end up using 2 characters (2 tildes) instead of 12.
    // http://rocha.la/JavaScript-bitwise-operators-in-practice
    const big = ~~(n / 0x0100000000);
    const low = (n % 0x0100000000);
    uintBuffer = new Buffer(8);
    uintBuffer.writeUInt32BE(big, 0);
    uintBuffer.writeUInt32BE(low, 4);
  }

  return uintBuffer.toString('hex');
}

to convert it

function uintFromBase62(uintBuffer) {
  const n = parseInt(uintBuffer.toString('hex'), 16);
  return n;
}

I'm confused because your example value of 0xFFFF is only 16-bit, not 64-bit.

Keep in mind that the JS number type is specified as an IEEE754 floating-point value, so it is not guaranteed to be able to hold a 64-bit unsigned value. If you want real 64-bit integer support, you need to use a module to provide it, like bignum. The readme for that has examples of reading and writing values to buffers.

Floating-point values can only represent values up to 2^53 - 1 without losing precision. You can see that in this example using standard JS numbers:

var b = new Buffer([0xFF, 0xFF, 0xFF, 0xFF, 0xFF, 0xFF, 0xFF, 0xFF])
var firstHalf = b.readUInt32BE(0); // 4294967295
var secondHalf = b.readUInt32BE(4); // 4294967295

var val = firstHalf * 0x100000000 + secondHalf; // 18446744073709552000

The result of this is 18446744073709552000 when the proper value is 18446744073709551615.

var bignum = require('bignum');

var b = new Buffer([0xFF, 0xFF, 0xFF, 0xFF, 0xFF, 0xFF, 0xFF, 0xFF])
var val = bignum.fromBuffer(b);

This results in a BigNum object with the value 18446744073709551615.

Also, to elaborate on your example code, the value you are using is only 16-bit, and you are trying to work with it using 32-bit functions. You can just do this:

var buf = new Buffer(2);

buf.fill(0) // clear all bytes of the buffer
console.log(buf); // outputs <Buffer 00 00>

var int = 0xffff; // as decimal: 65535

// Write it with a standard 16-bit function calls.
buf.writeUInt16BE(int);

// OR write it with 2 8-bit function calls.
buf.writeUInt8(int & 0xff, 0); // right the first part of the int
buf.writeUInt8((int >> 8) & 0xFF, 1); // right the second part of the int
console.log(buf); // outputs <Buffer ff ff>

// Read it as a 16-bit value.
var bufInt = buf.readUInt16BE(0);
console.log(bufInt);

// OR read it as two 8-bit values.
var bufInt = (buf.readUInt8(1) << 8) + buf.readUInt8(0);
// sending time
var sending_time = new Date().getTime();
buffer.writeInt32LE(parseInt(sending_time & 0xffffffff, 10), 16);
buffer.writeInt32LE(parseInt(sending_time / 0xffffffff, 10), 20);

Bitwise operations in JavaScript/EcmaScript will force the number (or any value really) into a 32-bit integer.

You really need to use bignum for larger values if you need certain precision, or dealing with buffers with larger than 32-bit values.

var bignum = require('bignum');

//max safe integer to big number
var num = bignum(Number.MAX_SAFE_INTEGER.toString());
var buf = num.toBuffer({endian:'big',size:8 /*8-byte / 64-bit*/});

console.log(buf); // 

The example above uses Number.MAX_SAFE_INTEGER which is Math.pow(2,53)-1. If you need to use larger numbers, they should be accessed as bignum strings... if you can stay within the range of Integers in JS, you can keep them and convert as above.

Reading / Writing 64bit values:

const int64 = Date.now()   // 1456909977176 (00 00 01 53 36 9a 06 58)
const b = new Buffer(8)
const MAX_UINT32 = 0xFFFFFFFF

// write
const big = ~~(int64 / MAX_UINT32)
const low = (int64 % MAX_UINT32) - big

b.writeUInt32BE(big, 0)  // 00 00 01 53 00 00 00 00
b.writeUInt32BE(low, 4)  // 00 00 01 53 36 9a 06 58

// read
var time = parseInt(b.toString('hex'), 16)
time == int64 // true

I use this code without any special modules.

UPDATE

Works only for numbers <= Number.MAX_SAFE_INTEGER

  • 1
    const low = int64 & MAX_UINT32 a bit shorter ^_^ – evilive Aug 10 '16 at 14:50
  • 1
    Given number from below: 18446744073709552000. ~~(18446744073709552000 / 0xFFFFFFFF) is 1, (18446744073709552000 % 0xFFFFFFFF) - 1 is 0. This code is broken. – Warty Apr 10 '17 at 5:07
  • @Warty Yes, you are right( This is small "hack" that worsk with some numbers. I will fix my code soon. Thx) Use bignum. – ReklatsMasters Apr 10 '17 at 5:50
  • 1
    I think you should divide and modulo by 0x0100000000 instead. Consider the case where int64 = 0xFFFFFFFF (=4294967295): high should = 0, low should = 4294967295, buffer should = <00 00 00 00 ff ff ff ff> But in your case high = 1, low = -1, buffer = <00 00 00 01 00 00 00 00> This is the correct code: const high = Math.trunc(int64 / 0x0100000000); const low = int64 % 0x0100000000; This will also be wrong every time the lowest int32 is FFFFFFFF. If you are using this to convert a date then may hit an error every 49.7 days. – boinged Feb 16 at 18:03
  • This code doesn't work – dash1e Jun 29 at 8:46

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