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Suppose I have a string like this

Some random words here 25 ms

I want to extract 25 and put it into another text file. How do I go about this?

Basically each line has some words in the beginning and a floating point decimal followed by ms at the end. 25 was just given as an example.

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Do you want to extract any sort of number or just integers? –  Mithrandir Feb 6 '13 at 15:26
4  
Edit your question to describe in words how you would want to find "25" in that string so we're not guessing. Is it because it's a number or because it's the last field on the line or because it's the 5th field or because it follows the word "here" or.... –  Ed Morton Feb 6 '13 at 15:31
    
Corrected. There was an error in my question. –  pratnala Feb 6 '13 at 15:52
    
@Mithrandir Any type of numbers. Guess I was vague. Updated the question. –  pratnala Feb 6 '13 at 16:01
    
See @sudo_O's answer. –  Ed Morton Feb 6 '13 at 17:21

5 Answers 5

up vote 2 down vote accepted

In awk by printing the penultimate field only:

$ awk '{print $(NF-1)}' <<< "Some random words here 25 ms" 
25

In grep with positive lookahead:

grep -Po "[0-9.]+(?= ms)"  <<< "Some random words here 25 ms" 
25
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There was a mistake in my original question. Really sorry for the trouble. Could you please update the answer? –  pratnala Feb 6 '13 at 15:58
1  
Sure, just print NF-1 i.e the 2nd from last field. –  iiSeymour Feb 6 '13 at 16:02

where the 25 should go? have you finished your question?

based on current version of your question. so the 25 is not random. just

echo "25" > another.file

if 25 is random number, always at the end of that line:

grep -oE '[0-9]+$' <<<" Some random words here 25" > another.file

EDIT

grep -Po '\d+(?= ms)' <<<"Some random words here 25 ms" > another.file
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There was a mistake in my original question. Really sorry for the trouble. Could you please update the answer? –  pratnala Feb 6 '13 at 15:59
    
@PratyushNalam edited. –  Kent Feb 6 '13 at 16:05
    
This doesn't work for floating points :( Does \d mean integers? What do we use for floating point decimals? –  pratnala Feb 9 '13 at 8:34
    
Change \d+ into [\d.]+ –  Kent Feb 9 '13 at 9:08
sed 's/[^0-9. ]*//g' input.txt > output.txt
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There was a mistake in my original question. Really sorry for the trouble. Could you please update the answer? –  pratnala Feb 6 '13 at 15:59

If there are lines who dont have ms in the end then you can do this as well

awk '$NF ~ /ms/{print $(NF-1)}' temp.txt

It will pick only those lines whose last field has ms

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I would scan for the last word that consists of only numbers (that may optionally have decimal places) just before ms.

sed 's/.* \([0-9.]*\) ms$/\1/' input.txt > output.txt
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There was a mistake in my original question. Really sorry for the trouble. Could you please update the answer? –  pratnala Feb 6 '13 at 15:55
    
@PratyushNalam: Done. –  jxh Feb 6 '13 at 20:38
    
If I input "This is 23.231 ms" it outputs 231 but it should output 23.231. What to do? –  pratnala Feb 9 '13 at 8:22
    
@PratyushNalam: Fixed. –  jxh Feb 10 '13 at 16:44

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