I have a dataset with multi-index columns in a pandas df that I would like to sort by values in a specific column. I have tried using sortindex and sortlevel but haven't been able get the results I am looking for. My dataset looks like:

    Group1    Group2
    A B C     A B C
1   1 0 3     2 5 7
2   5 6 9     1 0 0
3   7 0 2     0 3 5 

I want to sort all data and the index by column C in Group 1 in descending order so my results look like:

    Group1    Group2
    A B C     A B C
 2  5 6 9     1 0 0
 1  1 0 3     2 5 7
 3  7 0 2     0 3 5 

Is it possible to do this sort with the structure that my data is in, or should I be swapping Group1 to the index side?

up vote 82 down vote accepted

When sorting by a MultiIndex you need to contain the tuple describing the column inside a list*:

In [11]: df.sort_values([('Group1', 'C')], ascending=False)
Out[11]: 
  Group1       Group2      
       A  B  C      A  B  C
2      5  6  9      1  0  0
1      1  0  3      2  5  7
3      7  0  2      0  3  5

* so as not to confuse pandas into thinking you want to sort first by Group1 then by C.


Note: Originally used .sort since deprecated then removed in 0.20, in favor of .sort_values.

  • Thanks, exactly what I was looking for. – MattB Feb 6 '13 at 16:38
  • Hmmph. Faster than me and a better solution to boot. – DSM Feb 6 '13 at 16:39
  • @DSM What can I say? :D – Andy Hayden Feb 6 '13 at 16:41
  • 1
    Exactly what I needed, thanks. That wasn't clear from the docs (at least I didn't find it). Also, the error message when only defining the top level is misleading: Cannot sort by duplicate column X. – Jan-Philip Gehrcke Jul 26 '13 at 14:07
  • 5
    @KaushikGhose that sounds like could be a good feature request, I guess you can use loc: df.loc[('Group1', 'C')] – Andy Hayden Aug 1 '13 at 13:08

Your Answer

By clicking "Post Your Answer", you acknowledge that you have read our updated terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy, and that your continued use of the website is subject to these policies.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.