1

jQuery focus seems to cause internet explorer 9 to execute twice. This problem doesn't happen in older versions of IE, and doesn't happen in Firefox or Chrome.

I'm having a user enter a code in an input field. On enter or submit the code gets sent through a load to another script (ajax). The code in the input field is removed, and the focus is brought back.

The result of that script is inserted in a div on the same page.

    $(document).ready(function(){
        $('#code').keyup(function(e){
            if(e.keyCode == 13){
                console.log('Code submitted through enter');
                sendcode($('#code').val());
            }
        });

        function sendcode(b){
            console.log('function sendcode used');
            $('#Result').load('scan.php?code=' + b);
            $('#code').val('');
            $('#code').focus();
        };

        $('#Submit').click(function(){
            console.log('Code submitted through click');
            sendcode($('#code').val());
        });
    });

However, the focus() seems to be the problem since when I remove it the problem is gone. I have tried placing the focus() in any place of the code but without success. Is there any alternative to focus() that achieves the same or can it somehow be fixed?

NETWORK:

URL: /scan.php?code=stackoverflow
URL: /scan.php?code=

CONSOLE: (when hit enter)
Log: Code submitted through click 
Log: function sendcode used 
Log: Code submitted through enter 
Log: function sendcode used 

You can see the second load doesn't carry the code variable either.

  • Add a console log in the click function and see how many times it runs. – Kolby Feb 7 '13 at 9:15
  • Thanks for the suggestion. I've added the console logs and the log. Seems like it gets submitted through click first, and enter second. – Gillian Lo Wong Feb 7 '13 at 9:24
  • @GillianLo-Wong Can you provide a working demo of the problem? – Anthony Grist Feb 7 '13 at 9:41
  • @GillianLo-Wong Thats why i e.preventDefault() suggested in my answer. – Jai Feb 7 '13 at 9:41
2

Change the Submit button to a span or div and style it.

<span id="Submit">Submit</span>

Demo: Fiddle

You can also look at this answer, where adding an attribute type="button" to the button element is suggested.

  • Cheers, I've used a <button> instead. But the <input type="submit"> caused it to submit twice. – Gillian Lo Wong Feb 7 '13 at 9:37
2
    function sendcode(b){
        if(b){
            console.log('function sendcode used');
            $('#Result').load('scan.php?code=' + b);
            $('#code').val('');
            $('#code').focus();
        }
    };

Something along those lines should work. Maybe if b != undefined or something like that. Just make sure B is there.

  • Great and simple solution to 'filter out' the 'bad requests'. Cheers! – Gillian Lo Wong Feb 7 '13 at 9:39
1

Put the function outside of doc ready, try this:

function sendcode(b){
  $('#Result').load('scan.php?code=' + b);
  $('#code').val('');
  $('#code').focus();
}

$(document).ready(function(){
    $('#code').keyup(function(e){
        if(e.keyCode == 13){
            sendcode($('#code').val());
        }
    });

    $('#Submit').click(function(){
        sendcode($('#code').val());
    });
});

or try this one:

.load() is one of the jquery's ajax methods so you have to stop the submissions of form otherwise page gets refreshed.

$('#Submit').click(function(e){
    e.preventDefault();
    sendcode($('#code').val());
});
  • Just because it has an id of Submit doesn't mean that it's an actual submit button, or there's a form involved at all. – Anthony Grist Feb 7 '13 at 9:20
  • i just updated the answer little bit. – Jai Feb 7 '13 at 9:23
  • Thanks for the effort Jai, but unfortunately your suggestion doesn't work. Also, there is no form involved (sorry for the misconception) – Gillian Lo Wong Feb 7 '13 at 9:28
0

Don't intercept keystrokes unless you really, really mean it. Certainly don't emulate buttons with spans! HTML has tags besides span and div for a reason.

Your problem is arguably an IE bug, but it's what you get for mucking around with builtin behavior that works just fine. You only need one event handler that fires when the form is submitted.

$(document).ready(function(){
    function sendcode(b){
        console.log('function sendcode used');
        $('#Result').load('scan.php?code=' + b);
        $('#code').val('');
        $('#code').focus();
    };

    $('#form').submit(function(e) {
        e.preventDefault();
        sendcode($('#code').val());

    });
});

And then, frankly, you can have a more accessible form that doesn't rely on JavaScript, as well as code that's far more reusable:

$(document).ready(function(){
    $('#form').submit(function(e) {
        e.preventDefault();

        var $form = $(this);
        var data = $form.serialize();
        var action = $form.attr('action');
        $('#result').load(action + '?' + data);

        $('#code').val('').focus();
    });
});

Now the URL lives on the form's action attribute (which is where a form's target URL goes), and the JS will bundle up the form values like the browser would and ajax-submit the form for you. If the user has JS disabled, the form will submit normally and they'll still get a useful result, albeit in a new page. The code is shorter, URL escaping issues are taken care of for you, and there are fewer hard-coded values.

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