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Scenario:

  • Cache (L1) size (CS): 32kB
  • Line size (LS): 64B
  • Associativity (A): 8
  • Set size (SS): 512B (A * LS)
  • Sets (S): 64 (C / SS)
  • Read/written object (O) has size greater than LS

Assumptions (correct me if invalid):

  • Virtual memory blocks (of size 4kB (SS * A) denoted as B) are mapped in modulo-like manner to sets. In other words, addresses 0x0 : 0xFFFF (block index (BI) 0) are mapped to set 0, 0x1000 : 0x1FFF (BI 1) are mapped to 1, and so forth.
  • Request of reading/writing (no non-temporal writes/reads are used) a given address A requires finding its BI and then moving it to the assigned set. For instance, A = 0x4600A will have BI = 70. This BI is mapped to set 6 (BI % S).
  • In order to properly (without misalignment) r/w an object (O) to cache, an alignment of LS is required.

Questions:

  1. Will the O be serially aligned in the cache or it can take (for instance) free slots 0 & 4 & 5, instead of 0 & 1 & 2?
  2. What is the cost (penalty) of retrieving partitioned O from cache? Assume that the O isn't partitioned across several B.
  3. The same question as above, but in case when O is placed in two B, thus two sets are used.
  4. What will happen if the O size is larger than the SS (512B)? Will it move the data to L2 and step-by-step move data to L1? Will it use other sets?
  5. What if L2 (and L3 for that matter) is too small for all the data?
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    And how is that related to C++11? – Bartek Banachewicz Feb 24 '13 at 10:43
  • @BartekBanachewicz Mainly because of alignas() which provides easy and standardized access to alignment manipulation. When you start aligning data to optimize cache performance I believe it's natural to ask for the cost of caching large objects. – Red XIII Feb 24 '13 at 10:56
  • Uhh. It sounds a lot like premature optimizations. – Bartek Banachewicz Feb 24 '13 at 11:03
  • @BartekBanachewicz So any lower level optimization is considered premature? I am not pointing and saying: look guys, this is definitely the performance bottleneck of my code! Basing on the my previous experiences, proper cache usage gives HUGE performance boost, thus I fail to see why this question is irrelevant in terms of general program optimization. – Red XIII Feb 24 '13 at 14:12
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Virtual memory blocks (of size 4kB (SS * A) denoted as B) are mapped in modulo-like manner to sets. In other words, addresses 0x0 : 0xFFFF (block index (BI) 0) are mapped to set 0, 0x1000 : 0x1FFF (BI 1) are mapped to 1, and so forth.

Transfer between L1 cache and the memory hierarchy: the transfer unit between the L1 cache and the following level of the memory hierarchy is a block of line size (LS) bytes. That is, to your L1 cache, memory is structured in 64 bytes blocks (LS bytes).

Correspondence between memory blocks and cache entries: consecutive memory blocks are mapped to cache lines of consecutive sets. Hence, block 0 (addresses 0x0000 : 0x003F) is mapped to a cache line at set 0, block 1 (addresses 0x0040 : 0x007F) is mapped to a cache line at set 1, and so forth.


Request of reading/writing (no non-temporal writes/reads are used) a given address A requires finding its BI and then moving it to the assigned set. For instance, A = 0x4600A will have BI = 70. This BI is mapped to set 6 (BI % S).

The correct procedure to find the block identifier (or index) and the set index (SI) is the following:

 BI = A >> LS = 0x4600A >> 6 = 0x1180
 SI = BI & (S-1) = 0x1180 & 0x3F = 0x0000
 (when S is a power of two, BI & (S-1) = BI  mod S)

In order to properly (without misalignment) r/w an object (O) to cache, an alignment of LS is required.

That is not necessary. O does not need to be block-aligned.


Q1. Will the O be serially aligned in the cache or it can take (for instance) free slots 0 & 4 & 5, instead of 0 & 1 & 2?

O blocks will be stored in consecutive sets with cache line granularity (set k, k+1, …, S-1, 0, 1, …) .

Q2. What is the cost (penalty) of retrieving partitioned O from cache? Assume that the O isn't partitioned across several B. Q3. The same question as above, but in case when O is placed in two B, thus two sets are used.

I assume your are interested in the cost of the CPU reading the O words from cache. Supposing O is referenced sequentially, the number of cache accesses will be equal to the number of referenced words. I think the cost does not depend on the blocks being in the same or in different sets (at least in a multiported cache).

Q4. What will happen if the O size is larger than the SS (512B)? Will it move the data to L2 and step-by-step move data to L1? Will it use other sets?

Q5. What if L2 (and L3 for that matter) is too small for all the data?

If a block has to be allocated to a set with no free cache lines, a block has to be selected in order to be evicted (victim block). The replacement policy select the victim block according to an algorithm (LRU, pLRU, random).

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  • I can't vote either way since this topic is way out of my depth, but I wish SO had more Q&As like this one. Verbal +1 for the time being. – deceze May 23 '13 at 12:51

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