A coworker asked me today how to add a range to a collection. He has a class that inherits from Collection<T>. There's a get-only property of that type that already contains some items. He wants to add the items in another collection to the property collection. How can he do so in a C#3-friendly fashion? (Note the constraint about the get-only property, which prevents solutions like doing Union and reassigning.)

Sure, a foreach with Property. Add will work. But a List<T>-style AddRange would be far more elegant.

It's easy enough to write an extension method:

public static class CollectionHelpers
{
    public static void AddRange<T>(this ICollection<T> destination,
                                   IEnumerable<T> source)
    {
        foreach (T item in source)
        {
            destination.Add(item);
        }
    }
}

But I have the feeling I'm reinventing the wheel. I didn't find anything similar in System.Linq or morelinq.

Bad design? Just Call Add? Missing the obvious?

  • 3
    Remember that the Q from LINQ is 'query' and is really about data retrieval, projection, transformation, etc. Modifying existing collections really doesn't fall into the realm of LINQ's intended purpose, which is why LINQ doesn't provide anything out-of-the-box for this. But extension methods (and in particular your sample) would be ideal for this. – Levi Sep 25 '09 at 0:46
  • One problem, ICollection<T> does not seem to have an Add method. msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/… However Collection<T> has one. – Tim Goodman Jul 11 '13 at 5:58
  • @TimGoodman - That's the non-generic interface. See msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/92t2ye13.aspx – TrueWill Jul 11 '13 at 17:26
up vote 43 down vote accepted

No, this seems perfectly reasonable. There is a List<T>.AddRange() method that basically does just this, but requires your collection to be a concrete List<T>.

  • Thanks; very true, but most public properties follow the MS guidelines and are not Lists. – TrueWill Sep 25 '09 at 0:52
  • 4
    Yeah - I was giving it more as rationale for why I don't think there is a problem with doing this. Just realize it will be less efficient than the List<T> version (since the list<T> can pre-allocate) – Reed Copsey Sep 25 '09 at 1:12

Try casting to List in the extension method before running the loop. That way you can take advantage of the performance of List.AddRange.

public static void AddRange<T>(this ICollection<T> destination,
                               IEnumerable<T> source)
{
    List<T> list = destination as List<T>;

    if (list != null)
    {
        list.AddRange(source);
    }
    else
    {
        foreach (T item in source)
        {
            destination.Add(item);
        }
    }
}
  • 2
    The as operator will never throw. If destination cannot be cast, list will be null and the else block will execute. – rymdsmurf Oct 29 '14 at 12:04
  • 3
    arrgggh! Swap the condition branches, for the love of all that's holy! – nicodemus13 Jul 15 '16 at 16:11
  • 9
    I am serious, actually.The main reason is that it's extra cognitive-load, which is often really quite difficult. You're constantly trying to evaluate negative conditions, which is usually relatively hard, you have both branches anyway, it's (IMO) easier to say 'if null' do this, 'else' do this, rather than the opposite. It's also about defaults, they should be the positive concept as often as possible, .e.g `if (!thing.IsDisabled) {} else {}' requires you to stop and think 'ah, not is disabled means is enabled, right, got that, so the other branch is when it IS disabled). Hard to parse. – nicodemus13 Jul 20 '16 at 7:42
  • 9
    Interpreting "something != null" is not more difficult than interpreting "something == null". The negation operator however is a completely different thing, and in your last example rewriting the if-else-statement would elliminate that operator. That is a objectively an improvement, but one that is not related to the original question. In that particular case the two forms are a matter of personal preferences, and I would prefer the "!="-operator, given the reasoning above. – rymdsmurf Jul 25 '16 at 9:39
  • 2
    Pattern matching will make everyone happy... ;-) if (destination is List<T> list) – Jacob Foshee Sep 1 '17 at 21:47

Remember that each Add will check the capacity of the collection and resize it whenever necessary (slower). With AddRange, the collection will be set the capacity and then added the items (faster). This extension method will be extremely slow, but will work.

  • 3
    To add to this, there will also be a collection change notification for each addition, as opposed to one bulk notification with AddRange. – Nick Udell Sep 22 '14 at 9:58

Since .NET4.5 if you want one-liner you can use System.Collections.Generic ForEach.

source.ForEach(o => destination.Add(o));

or even shorter as

source.ForEach(destination.Add);

Performance-wise it's same as for each loop (syntactic sugar).

Also don't try assigning it like

var x = source.ForEach(destination.Add) 

cause ForEach is void.

The C5 Generic Collections Library classes all support the AddRange method. C5 has a much more robust interface that actually exposes all of the features of its underlying implementations and is interface-compatible with the System.Collections.Generic ICollection and IList interfaces, meaning that C5's collections can be easily substituted as the underlying implementation.

You could add your IEnumerable range to a list then set the ICollection = to the list.

        IEnumerable<T> source;

        List<item> list = new List<item>();
        list.AddRange(source);

        ICollection<item> destination = list;

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