0

I have tried this. This accepts only integers. I want both negative and non negative.

    $(function () {
        $('.spinner').keyup(function () {
            if (this.value.match(/[^0-9]/g)) {
                this.value = this.value.replace(/[^0-9]/g, '');
            }
        });
    });
4
  • Could you tell me what kind of HTML element is $('.spinner') ? – kidwon Feb 7 '13 at 12:53
  • @PeterHerdenborg Yes it should. He only needs to remove non-digits if it contains non-digits. – Barmar Feb 7 '13 at 13:04
  • Yeah, sorry, I got that wrong, which is why I removed my comment. – Peter Herdenborg Feb 7 '13 at 13:12
  • In chrome, type="number" happily ignores anything not a number – mplungjan Feb 7 '13 at 13:17
0

haven't tested but have you tried something like this:

$(function () {
    $('.spinner').keyup(function () {
        if (this.value.match(/[^0-9-]/g)) {
            this.value = this.value.replace(/[^0-9-]/g, '');
        }
    });
});

By adding the extra '-' in the reg-ex: the first one is to specify a range, the second one the actual char.

You could also refine the whole process and always set the value to : everything that matches:

^[-]{0,1}[0-9]+

Start of the line by nothing or - followed by a succession of digits, at least one or more.

0
0

There is no need for both matching and replacing. Instead of

if (this.value.match(/[^0-9]/g)) {
    this.value = this.value.replace(/[^0-9]/g, '');
}

use

this.value = this.value.replace(/([+-]?\d+)/, '$1');

I assume you only expect to find one integer in the field.

0

You can keep using regular expressions, or if you prefer "pure logic" which for my eyes is more readable you can use such code:

$('.spinner').keyup(function (evt) {
    var previousValue = $(this).data("prev") || "";
    var currentValue = this.value;
    var valid = true;
    if (currentValue.length > 0 && currentValue !== "-") {
        //having something we can check:
        var number = Number(currentValue);

        //integer only if not NaN and integer value equals
        valid = (!isNaN(number) && parseInt(number, 10) == number);
    }

    if (valid) {
        $(this).data("prev", currentValue);
    } else {
        //restore last good value:
        this.value = (previousValue.length == 0) ? "" : parseInt(previousValue, 10);
    }
});

This will check every time if the value is valid integer and when not valid, restore the previous value which passed the validation.

Note the usage of Number() instead of parseInt(), that's due to the later allowing things like "5a" which is parsed as 5 while Number("5a") will give NaN value.

Live test case.

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