10

I'm using a library that requires I provide an object that implements this interface:

public interface IConsole {
    TextWriter StandardInput { get; }
    TextReader StandardOutput { get; }
    TextReader StandardError { get; }
}

The object's readers then get used by the library with:

IConsole console = new MyConsole();
int readBytes = console.StandardOutput.Read(buffer, 0, buffer.Length);

Normally the class implementing IConsole has the StandardOutput stream as coming from an external process. In that case the console.StandardOutput.Read calls work by blocking until there is some data written to the StandardOutput stream.

What I'm trying to do is create a test IConsole implementation that uses MemoryStreams and echo's whatever appears on the StandardInput back onto the StandardInput. I tried:

MemoryStream echoOutStream = new MemoryStream();
StandardOutput = new StreamReader(echoOutStream);

But the problem with that is the console.StandardOutput.Read will return 0 rather than block until there is some data. Is there anyway I can get a MemoryStream to block if there is no data available or is there a different in memory stream I could use?

  • 1
    You really shouldn't be reading from an output stream. – Martin v. Löwis Sep 25 '09 at 6:39
  • I can't believe .net doesn't have this built in. I'm taking a SQL VDI that writes raw backup data to a .NET stream, and then I need to read from that stream and write it to a remote powershell PSSession output. Unfortunately, I can't seem to read the stream because it always returns 0. – Brain2000 Dec 5 '18 at 5:31
  • @Martinv.Löwis It's never about what you shouldn't be doing. It's about what you can do with the tools given. Being able to read and write from the same stream should be easy to do, but it's not. – Brain2000 Dec 6 '18 at 1:59
11

Inspired by your answer, here's my multi-thread, multi-write version:

public class EchoStream : MemoryStream
{
    private readonly ManualResetEvent _DataReady = new ManualResetEvent(false);
    private readonly ConcurrentQueue<byte[]> _Buffers = new ConcurrentQueue<byte[]>();

    public bool DataAvailable{get { return !_Buffers.IsEmpty; }}

    public override void Write(byte[] buffer, int offset, int count)
    {
        _Buffers.Enqueue(buffer);
        _DataReady.Set();
    }

    public override int Read(byte[] buffer, int offset, int count)
    {
        _DataReady.WaitOne();

        byte[] lBuffer;

        if (!_Buffers.TryDequeue(out lBuffer))
        {
            _DataReady.Reset();
            return -1;
        }

        if (!DataAvailable)
            _DataReady.Reset();

        Array.Copy(lBuffer, buffer, lBuffer.Length);
        return lBuffer.Length;
    }
}

With your version you should Read the Stream upon Write, without any consecutively write be possible. My version buffers any written buffer in a ConcurrentQueue (it's fairly simple to change it to a simple Queue and lock it)

  • this is awesome, however there's a bug in Write method, _Buffers.Enqueue(buffer); should be replaced with _Buffers.Enqueue(buffer.Take(count).ToArray()); and then it's really working, blocking and exchanging data between threads! Thanks! – Marcin Tarsier Feb 23 '18 at 10:47
  • Further, should be _Buffers.Enqueue(buffer.Skip(offset).Take(count).ToArray()); And note that Read currently ignores offset and count (to implement, replace ConcurrentQueue<byte[]> with ConcurrentQueue<byte> and TryDequeue in a loop until you have enough or there are none left) – kskid19 Sep 21 '18 at 14:40
  • This may not work out very well if you attempt to read with a buffer size smaller than the write. The Array.Copy will throw an exception if there's not enough room... – Brain2000 Dec 5 '18 at 6:05
9

In the end I found an easy way to do it by inheriting from MemoryStream and taking over the Read and Write methods.

public class EchoStream : MemoryStream {

    private ManualResetEvent m_dataReady = new ManualResetEvent(false);
    private byte[] m_buffer;
    private int m_offset;
    private int m_count;

    public override void Write(byte[] buffer, int offset, int count) {
        m_buffer = buffer;
        m_offset = offset;
        m_count = count;
        m_dataReady.Set();
    }

    public override int Read(byte[] buffer, int offset, int count) {
        if (m_buffer == null) {
            // Block until the stream has some more data.
            m_dataReady.Reset();
            m_dataReady.WaitOne();    
        }

        Buffer.BlockCopy(m_buffer, m_offset, buffer, offset, (count < m_count) ? count : m_count);
        m_buffer = null;
        return (count < m_count) ? count : m_count;
    }
}
  • 1
    You have a race condition in Read(). If Write() is called by another thread between the null check of the buffer and m_dataReady.Reset(), you may potentially have to wait forever if the server will not send data again. In most request/response protocols, this would create a dead lock. I suggest you use a automatic event instead. – Jörgen Sigvardsson Dec 9 '14 at 11:40
  • Fair enough. I'd agree it's worth putting a check in for. Needless to say I've had the above code in production on a public facing SSH service for 5 years and have never had the service hang so I suspect it's a very low probability condition. – sipwiz Dec 11 '14 at 3:02
  • @sipwiz this is a good answer. However, the use of Array.copy does not allow the read to function properly. It won't support offset copies. You need change to Buffer.BlockCopy(m_buffer, 0, buffer, offset, m_count); this is also faster on most systems. – mark gamache Oct 1 '15 at 3:23
  • This version isn't going to work out very well if the Read buffer is smaller than the write. While it won't throw an exception like the function above, this one will just start lopping off data. – Brain2000 Dec 5 '18 at 6:09
0

I'm going to add one more refined version of EchoStream. This is a combination of the other two versions, plus some suggestions from the comments.

This version has a couple of differences.

1) The constructor can set a max queue depth and if this level is reached then stream writes will block until a Read is performed which drops the queue depth back below the max level (no limit=0, default=10).

2) When reading/writing data, the buffer offset and count are now honored. Also, you can call Read with a smaller buffer than Write without throwing an exception or losing data. BlockCopy is used in a loop to fill in the bytes until count is satisfied.

3) There is a public property called AlwaysCopyBuffer, which makes a copy of the buffer in the Write function. Setting this to true will safely allow the byte buffer to be reused after calling Write.

4) There is a public property called ReadTimeoutMilliseconds, which controls how long the Read function will block before it returns 0 (default=Infinite, -1).

5) This should be thread safe for simultaneous reads and writes.

using System.IO;
using System.Threading;
using System.Collections.Concurrent;

public class EchoStream : MemoryStream
{
    public int ReadTimeoutMilliseconds { get; set; } = Timeout.Infinite;
    public bool AlwaysCopyBuffer { get; set; } = false;

    private readonly AutoResetEvent _DataReady = new AutoResetEvent(false);
    private readonly AutoResetEvent _DataFull = new AutoResetEvent(false);
    private readonly Object _lock = new Object();

    private readonly ConcurrentQueue<byte[]> _Buffers = new ConcurrentQueue<byte[]>();
    private int _maxQueueDepth = 10;

    private byte[] m_buffer = null;
    private int m_offset = 0;
    private volatile int m_count = 0;

    public bool DataAvailable { get { return !_Buffers.IsEmpty; } }

    public EchoStream() : base(256)
    {
    }

    public EchoStream(int maxQueueDepth) : base(256)
    {
        _maxQueueDepth = maxQueueDepth;
    }

    public override void Write(byte[] buffer, int offset, int count)
    {
        while (_maxQueueDepth > 0 && _Buffers.Count >= _maxQueueDepth)
        {
            _DataFull.WaitOne();
        }

        if(!AlwaysCopyBuffer && offset==0 && count==buffer.Length)
        {
            _Buffers.Enqueue(buffer); //optimization if entire buffer is to be used
        }
        else
        {
            _Buffers.Enqueue(buffer.Skip(offset).Take(count).ToArray());
        }
        _DataReady.Set();
    }

    public override int Read(byte[] buffer, int offset, int count)
    {
        lock(_lock)
        {
            if (m_count == 0 && _Buffers.Count == 0)
            {
                _DataReady.Reset();
                if (_Buffers.Count == 0) //check count again after resetting event to avoid a race condition
                {
                    if(!_DataReady.WaitOne(ReadTimeoutMilliseconds)) return 0;
                }
            }

            int returnBytes = 0;
            while (count > 0)
            {
                if (m_count == 0)
                {
                    byte[] lBuffer = null;
                    if (_Buffers.TryDequeue(out lBuffer))
                    {
                        _DataFull.Set();
                        m_buffer = lBuffer;
                        m_offset = 0;
                        m_count = lBuffer.Length;
                    }
                    else
                    {
                        return returnBytes = 0 ? -1 : returnBytes;
                    }
                }

                var bytesToCopy = (count < m_count) ? count : m_count);
                if (m_offset == 0 && offset == 0 && m_count == count)
                {
                    buffer = m_buffer; //optimization if the entire buffer is to be copied
                }
                else
                {
                    System.Buffer.BlockCopy(m_buffer, m_offset, buffer, offset, bytesToCopy);
                }
                m_offset += bytesToCopy;
                m_count -= bytesToCopy;
                offset += bytesToCopy;
                count -= bytesToCopy;

                returnBytes += bytesToCopy;
            }

            return returnBytes;
        }
    }
}

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