8

I would like to split my data frame using a couple of columns and call let's say fivenum on each group.

aggregate(Petal.Width ~ Species, iris, function(x) summary(fivenum(x)))

The returned value is a data.frame with only 2 columns and the second being a matrix. How can I turn it into normal columns of a data.frame?

Update

I want something like the following with less code using fivenum

ddply(iris, .(Species), summarise,
      Min = min(Petal.Width),
      Q1 = quantile(Petal.Width, .25),
      Med = median(Petal.Width),
      Q3 = quantile(Petal.Width, .75),
      Max = max(Petal.Width)
      )
  • The returned value is a data.frame of seven columns. It has nothing to do with a matrix. Maybe if you showed the results you were expecting, it would be easier to answer this question. – nograpes Feb 7 '13 at 18:45
  • 2
    @nograpes Try wrapping the sample line into length() – mlt Feb 7 '13 at 18:46
  • Ha. you're right! – nograpes Feb 7 '13 at 18:46
5

You can use do.call to call data.frame on each of the matrix elements recursively to get a data.frame with vector elements:

dim(do.call("data.frame",dfr))
[1] 3 7

str(do.call("data.frame",dfr))
'data.frame':   3 obs. of  7 variables:
 $ Species            : Factor w/ 3 levels "setosa","versicolor",..: 1 2 3
 $ Petal.Width.Min.   : num  0.1 1 1.4
 $ Petal.Width.1st.Qu.: num  0.2 1.2 1.8
 $ Petal.Width.Median : num  0.2 1.3 2
 $ Petal.Width.Mean   : num  0.28 1.36 2
 $ Petal.Width.3rd.Qu.: num  0.3 1.5 2.3
 $ Petal.Width.Max.   : num  0.6 1.8 2.5
10

Here is a solution using data.table (while not specifically requested, it is an obvious compliment or replacement for aggregate or ddply. As well as being slightly long to code, repeatedly calling quantile will be inefficient, as for each call you will be sorting the data

library(data.table)
Tukeys_five <- c("Min","Q1","Med","Q3","Max") 

IRIS <- data.table(iris)
# this will create the wide data.table
lengthBySpecies <- IRIS[,as.list(fivenum(Sepal.Length)), by = Species]

# and you can rename the columns from V1, ..., V5 to something nicer

setnames(lengthBySpecies, paste0('V',1:5), Tukeys_five)


lengthBySpecies



      Species Min  Q1 Med  Q3 Max
1:     setosa 4.3 4.8 5.0 5.2 5.8
2: versicolor 4.9 5.6 5.9 6.3 7.0
3:  virginica 4.9 6.2 6.5 6.9 7.9

Or, using a single call to quantile using the appropriate prob argument.

IRIS[,as.list(quantile(Sepal.Length, prob = seq(0,1, by = 0.25))), by = Species]


       Species  0%   25% 50% 75% 100%
1:     setosa 4.3 4.800 5.0 5.2  5.8
2: versicolor 4.9 5.600 5.9 6.3  7.0
3:  virginica 4.9 6.225 6.5 6.9  7.9  

Note that the names of the created columns are not syntactically valid, although you could go through a similar renaming using setnames


EDIT

Interestingly, quantile will set the names of the resulting vector if you set names = TRUE, and this will copy (slow down the number crunching and consume memory - it even warns you in the help, fancy that!)

Thus, you should probably use

 IRIS[,as.list(quantile(Sepal.Length, prob = seq(0,1, by = 0.25), names = FALSE)), by = Species]

Or, if you wanted to return the named list, without R copying internally

IRIS[,{quant <- as.list(quantile(Sepal.Length, prob = seq(0,1, by = 0.25), names = FALSE))
       setattr(quant, 'names', Tukeys_five)
       quant}, by = Species]
  • This convinced me to finally learn to use data.table – Andy Barbour Jan 31 '14 at 20:17
4

As far as I know, there isn't an exact way to do what you're asking, because the function you're using (fivenum) doesn't return data in a way that can be easily bound to columns from within the 'ddply' function. This is easy to clean up, though, in a programmatic way.

Step 1: Perform the fivenum function on each 'Species' value using the 'ddply' function.

data <- ddply(iris, .(Species), summarize, value=fivenum(Petal.Width))

#       Species value
# 1      setosa   0.1
# 2      setosa   0.2
# 3      setosa   0.2
# 4      setosa   0.3
# 5      setosa   0.6
# 6  versicolor   1.0
# 7  versicolor   1.2
# 8  versicolor   1.3
# 9  versicolor   1.5
# 10 versicolor   1.8
# 11  virginica   1.4
# 12  virginica   1.8
# 13  virginica   2.0
# 14  virginica   2.3
# 15  virginica   2.5

Now, the 'fivenum' function returns a list, so we end up with 5 line entries for each species. That's the part where the 'fivenum' function is fighting us.

Step 2: Add a label column. We know what Tukey's five numbers are, so we just call them out in the order that the 'fivenum' function returns them. The list will repeat until it hits the end of the data.

Tukeys_five <- c("Min","Q1","Med","Q3","Max") 
data$label <- Tukeys_five

#       Species value label
# 1      setosa   0.1   Min
# 2      setosa   0.2    Q1
# 3      setosa   0.2   Med
# 4      setosa   0.3    Q3
# 5      setosa   0.6   Max
# 6  versicolor   1.0   Min
# 7  versicolor   1.2    Q1
# 8  versicolor   1.3   Med
# 9  versicolor   1.5    Q3
# 10 versicolor   1.8   Max
# 11  virginica   1.4   Min
# 12  virginica   1.8    Q1
# 13  virginica   2.0   Med
# 14  virginica   2.3    Q3
# 15  virginica   2.5   Max

Step 3: With the labels in place, we can quickly cast this data into a new shape using the 'dcast' function from the 'reshape2' package.

library(reshape2)
dcast(data, Species ~ label)[,c("Species",Tukeys_five)]

#      Species Min  Q1 Med  Q3 Max
# 1     setosa 0.1 0.2 0.2 0.3 0.6
# 2 versicolor 1.0 1.2 1.3 1.5 1.8
# 3  virginica 1.4 1.8 2.0 2.3 2.5

All that junk at the end are just specifying the column order, since the 'dcast' function automatically puts things in alphabetical order.

Hope this helps.

Update: I decided to return, because I realized there is one other option available to you. You can always bind a matrix as part of a data frame definition, so you could resolve your 'aggregate' function like so:

data <- aggregate(Petal.Width ~ Species, iris, function(x) summary(fivenum(x))) 
result <- data.frame(Species=data[,1],data[,2])

#      Species Min. X1st.Qu. Median Mean X3rd.Qu. Max.
# 1     setosa  0.1      0.2    0.2 0.28      0.3  0.6
# 2 versicolor  1.0      1.2    1.3 1.36      1.5  1.8
# 3  virginica  1.4      1.8    2.0 2.00      2.3  2.5
  • I was thinking about casting data. I usually use reshape for that but it is nice to see how it can be done with plyr. Your updated answer is essentially what James suggested. I forgot that one can "cbind" data.frames including implicit conversion from matrix like that. – mlt Feb 7 '13 at 20:39
0

This is my solution:

ddply(iris, .(Species), summarize, value=t(fivenum(Petal.Width)))
  • And how is it different from what Dinre wrote? – mlt Oct 5 '15 at 22:07
  • It is simple, short and slick. Here, the vector values of "fivenum" form a matrix. So the result has two columns, one is the labels and the other one is a matrix of five columns – pmjn6 Oct 6 '15 at 15:05
  • You will be surprised by calling ncol on that. – mlt Oct 6 '15 at 22:40
  • I just applied ncol , and the result was 2, as I mentioned above – pmjn6 Oct 7 '15 at 13:23
  • Oops, my bad, I missed you acknowledge that earlier. Anyway discussion goes to nowhere and solution is no different than Step 1 from Dinre. It is somewhat unusable as there are too many levels of indirection and in most cases it needs to be flattened. – mlt Oct 7 '15 at 18:41

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