1

I'm using sympy to write superscript using the pretty_print command. This needs to be imported along with some variables(algebra(x,y,etc.)) in order for the pretty_print command to work. If you dont import the variables(algebra) from sympy.abc, you will need to put the letters in quote marks '' in which the pretty_print command won't work.

So for example if I print on the screen, i need to import x so it can be used in the program. Like this:

import sympy  
from sympy import pretty_text as exp   
from sympy.abc import x

equation= x**2

exp(equation)

This will print x² on the screen. The problem is if i assign a value to x, then it will no longer be equal to itself. If i print x directly after import from sympy.abc, it does this-

(pretending this is IDLE) >

>>> import sympy  
>>> from sympy import pretty_text as exp   
>>> from sympy.abc import x

>>> x
x 

however if a make x 1

>>> import sympy  
>>> from sympy import pretty_text as exp   
>>> from sympy.abc import x

>>> x
x 
>>> x = 1
>>>x
1

Then i need to square x again,

>>> import sympy  
>>> from sympy import pretty_text as exp   
>>> from sympy.abc import x

>>> x
x 
>>> x = 1
>>>x
1 
>>> equation = x**2
>>> exp(equation)
1

It will just square 1. Even if it try to make x = 'x' again it is not the same since it will have the '' around it. I can only fix this by importing it again. However, in my program i could end up needing to import any letter again so I would need to import a variable. I tried

from sympy.abc import x[0]

But that's invalid. So, is there any way i could import a varying letter?

2
  • Putting x in quotes creates a string, which is a completely separate object from a Symbol.
    – asmeurer
    Commented Feb 8, 2013 at 17:57
  • There are many misconceptions present in your question. Take a read of docs.sympy.org/0.7.2/gotchas.html and see if that clears some things up (particularly the variables section).
    – asmeurer
    Commented Feb 8, 2013 at 17:59

3 Answers 3

2

If you want to preserve symbols, do not assign any values to them - keep using symbols until you really need a solution.

For example:

In [15]: equation=sympy.sin(x**2)

In [16]: exp(equation)
   ⎛ 2⎞
sin⎝x ⎠

In [17]: result = equation.subs({'x': 2})

In [18]: result
Out[18]: sin(4)

In [19]: result.evalf()
Out[19]: -0.756802495307928

This does not change the x itself - later on:

In [23]: exp(sympy.log(x**.5))
   ⎛ 0.5⎞
log⎝x   ⎠

Keep your equations in the symbolic form for as long as needed and don't worry about the values themselves.

1

You don't need to import symbol names in SymPy. The abc module is just there for convenience for one-letter symbol names.

Just create the Symbol object with whatever name you want (this can be any string, including one created dynamically).

>>> x = Symbol('x')
>>> x
x

Also note that the name you give the symbol and the name of the Python variable holding that symbol need not be related. Indeed a Symbol has no idea what Python variable names it is bound to (this is how everything works in Python, not just SymPy)

>>> x = Symbol('y')
>>> x
y 

You can also use symbols to create multiple symbols at once

>>> x, y, z = symbols('x y z')
2
  • Is this command imported from sympy? When i imported it from sympy and tried this i got and error saying object is not callable.
    – Nick
    Commented Feb 12, 2013 at 0:43
  • Yes, Symbol and symbols are both imported from SymPy.
    – asmeurer
    Commented Feb 12, 2013 at 3:17
0

If you instead do:

import sympy.abc
x = sympy.abc.x

Then whenever you need your original value, just use sympy.abc.x. If you need to dynamically get a name:

getattr(sympy.abc, "x")

Where the literal could be replaced with any variable.

14
  • I understand your first part with using the x = sympy.abc.x , but could you explain the getattr(sympy.abc, "x") how do i use that with a variable?
    – Nick
    Commented Feb 8, 2013 at 1:10
  • @Nick getattr() is a built in that gets an attribute from an object, so if you have an instance of a class with a name attribute, inst.name is exactly equivalent to getattr(inst, "name") - modules work in the same way. getattr(sympy.abc, "x") is another way to write sympy.abc.x, except "x" could be any variable, allowing you to get different attributes dynamically. Commented Feb 8, 2013 at 1:27
  • i tried testing that and when i tried making "x" a variable it said the attribute must be a string. So how can i change the letter i want to import dynamically using this?
    – Nick
    Commented Feb 8, 2013 at 17:03
  • @Nick The variable needs to contain the name of the variable you wish to import, so if you wish to import a variable sympy.abc.z, the variable you pass to getattr() needs to contain the value 'z'. Commented Feb 8, 2013 at 17:27
  • Why have I received a -1 for this? Commented Feb 8, 2013 at 18:01

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