31

When I'm calling a Go template function to output HTML, it displays ZgotmplZ.

Sample code:

http://play.golang.org/p/tfuJa_pFkm

package main

import (
    "html/template"
    "os"
)

func main() {
    funcMap := template.FuncMap{
        "printSelected": func(s string) string {
            if s == "test" {
                return `selected="selected"`
            }
            return ""
        },

        "safe": func(s string) template.HTML {
            return template.HTML(s)
        },
    }
    template.Must(template.New("Template").Funcs(funcMap).Parse(`
    <option {{ printSelected "test" }} {{ printSelected "test" | safe }} >test</option>
    `)).Execute(os.Stdout, nil)

}

Output:

<option ZgotmplZ ZgotmplZ >test</option>
29

"ZgotmplZ" is a special value that indicates that unsafe content reached a CSS or URL context at runtime. The output of the example will be:

 <img src="#ZgotmplZ">

You can add a safe and attr function to the template funcMap:

package main

import (
    "html/template"
    "os"
)

func main() {
    funcMap := template.FuncMap{
        "attr":func(s string) template.HTMLAttr{
            return template.HTMLAttr(s)
        },
        "safe": func(s string) template.HTML {
            return template.HTML(s)
         },
    }

    template.Must(template.New("Template").Funcs(funcMap).Parse(`
    <option {{  .attr |attr }} >test</option>
        {{.html|safe}}
     `)).Execute(os.Stdout,   map[string]string{"attr":`selected="selected"`,"html":`<option selected="selected">option</option>`})
}

The output will look like:

<option selected="selected" >test</option>
<option selected="selected">option</option>

You may want to define some other functions which can convert string to template.CSS, template.JS, template.JSStr, template.URL etc.

| improve this answer | |
  • 2
    This doesn't work either, FYI (for a function that takes input and uses it in the output). – Randy Proctor Feb 10 '13 at 17:08
  • safe can let you display raw html in template. – Joe Feb 13 '13 at 2:31
  • 2
    Use template.HTMLAttr instead of template.HTML, it work fine. see updated code. – Joe Feb 14 '13 at 11:18
  • This works, thanks. Demonstrated for posterity: play.golang.org/p/nq3-7GYAoY – Randy Proctor Feb 14 '13 at 23:27
  • function iteral is unessary – Nate Scarlet Nov 23 '19 at 17:52
6

I had similar problem with <img src="{{myfunction}}"> where myfunction return encoded image.

Finally I solved it when instead of string function return template.URL(mystring).

| improve this answer | |
4

You are trying to output HTML in a place where template/html thinks is unsafe (for example, inside an HTML element, like this:

<option {{ printSelected }}>

I cannot find any way to convince it it is safe (including returning template.HTML instead of string); the only alternative I have found is to rewrite the template, in this example use a bool output instead:

<option {{ if printSelected }}selected{{ end }}>
| improve this answer | |
  • Personally, I prefer your suggestion, for a simple reason: notwithstanding all the other correct answers, yours — while possibly 'more verbose' — is the only one that guarantees that unsafe content will never reach the template. This, IMHO, should be the best way of doing things. Any tricks or hacks which rely on 'fooling' Go to accept potential unsafe code is... well, not safe, is it? – Gwyneth Llewelyn Jun 16 at 19:31
2

easiest way:

import "html/template"
yourhref = template.URL(yourhref)
| improve this answer | |
2
package main

import (
    "html/template"
    "os"
)

type T struct {
    HTML template.HTML
    ATTR template.HTMLAttr
    URL  template.URL
    JS   template.JS
    CSS  template.CSS
}

func main() {

    data := T{
        HTML: `<div>test div</div>`,
        ATTR: `selected="selected"`,
        URL:  `https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/5/53/Google_%22G%22_Logo.svg`,
        CSS:  `font-size: 15px`,
        JS:   `console.log("hello world")`,
    }

    template.Must(template.New("Template").Parse(`
        {{.HTML}}
        <option {{.ATTR}} style="{{.CSS}}">test</option>
        <script>{{.JS}}</script>
        <img src="{{.URL}}">
    `)).Execute(os.Stdout, data)
}

output

<div>test div</div>
<option selected="selected" style="font-size: 15px">test</option>
<script>console.log("hello world")</script>
<img src="https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/5/53/Google_%22G%22_Logo.svg">

playground Example

| improve this answer | |
0

You should wrap the string in an HTMLAttr, which was designed for text that gets injected in between angle brackets. Per the documentation:

https://golang.org/pkg/html/template/#HTMLAttr

HTMLAttr encapsulates an HTML attribute from a trusted source, for example,  dir="ltr".

Use of this type presents a security risk: the encapsulated content should come from a trusted source, as it will be included verbatim in the template output.

type HTMLAttr string

| improve this answer | |

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