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I am planing to add at most 10 .htaccess rewrite url codes in home directory will it affect execution ( loading time of site ) of my website ?

my current .htaccess file is

Options +FollowSymLinks
RewriteEngine On
RewriteRule ^([0-9]+)/([0-9]+)/([^.]+).html index.php?perma=$3
RewriteRule ^movies/([^.]+).html gallery.php?movie=$1
RewriteRule ^album/([^.]+).html gallery.php?album=$1
RewriteRule ^img/([^.]+)/([^.]+).html gallery.php?img=$2
RewriteRule ^movies.html gallery.php
  • 7
    Will it have an impact? Yes. Will it be noticeable? No. – diolemo Feb 8 '13 at 7:03
  • Run your website through PageSpeed Insights to learn about things you need to worry about. – Salman A Feb 8 '13 at 8:42
2
0

Yes it will affect the load time. The more rules/exceptions you have, the longer it takes to render. But: we are talking about micro/milliseconds that won't be even noticed by the human eye.

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2
0

You might need to see performance impact of order of rewrite rules when using apache mod_rewrite and, like @diolemo commented, for 20 rewrite rules it's not noticeable.

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2
0

10 rules are not a problem, but for future reference: The usual approach is to redirect everything to a single entry point and let the application do the routing. A simple example:

.htaccess

RewriteEngine On
RewriteCond %{REQUEST_FILENAME} !-f
RewriteCond %{REQUEST_FILENAME} !-d
RewriteRule .* index.php [L,QSA]

index.php

$query = $_SERVER['REQUEST_URI'];
$queryParts = explode('/', $query);
switch($queryParts[0]) {
    case 'movies':
        // ...
        break;
    case 'album':
        // ...
        break;
    case 'img':
        // ...
        break;
    // ...
    default:
        // 404 not found
}

The RewriteCond conditions assure that requests to existing files are not rewritten. QSA is optional, it means "query string appended", so that for example movies.html?sort=title gets rewritten to index.php?sort=title. The original request URI is available in $_SERVER['REQUEST_URI'].

If your application is object oriented, the Front Controller pattern will be of interest to you. All major PHP frameworks use it in some way, it might help to look at their implementations.

If not, a micro-framework like Silex could do the job for you. In Silex your routing could look as follows:

index.php

require_once __DIR__.'/../vendor/autoload.php';

$app = new Silex\Application();

$app->get('/{year}/{month}/{slug}', function ($year, $month, $slug) use ($app) {
    return include 'article.php';
});
$app->get('/movies/{movie}.html', function ($movie) use ($app) {
    return include 'gallery.php';
});
$app->get('/album/{album}.html', function ($album) use ($app) {
    return include 'gallery.php';
});
$app->get('/img/{parent}/{img}.html', function ($parent, $img) use ($app) {
    return include 'gallery.php';
});
$app->get('/movies.html', function () use ($app) {
    return include 'gallery.php';
});

$app->run();

gallery.php and article.php would have to return their output. You probably can reuse your existing scripts with this index.php if you replace $_GET['var'] with $var and add output buffering:

gallery.php

ob_start();
// ...
return ob_get_clean();
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1
0

Most of the time needed to download a webpage comes from retrieving the HTML, CSS, JavaScript, and images. The time to rewrite the URL is negligible.

Usually, the images are the biggest cause of slow load times. A tool like Pingdom can help you put the load times of various components in perspective.

http://tools.pingdom.com/fpt/

HTH.

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