17

With the CSS border-radius property I can have a curvy, rounded border corner at the end.

.boxLeft{
    border-right: 1px dashed #333;
    border-bottom: 1px dashed #333;
    border-radius: 0 0 10px 0;
}

.boxRight{
    border-left: 1px dashed #333;
    border-bottom: 1px dashed #333;
    border-radius: 0 0 0 10px;
}

But I want a border corner like the image below. If I have two boxes (Yellow & Pink) meeting each other and I want a harsh corner at the bottom meeting point (dotted corner), what should I do?

enter image description here

Is that possible using CSS?

2
  • You should use something like (pseudocode) .boxLeft + .boxRight {border-bottom-left-radius:0} - cant remember exacly. I had something similar i'll post if i find it.
    – user133408
    Feb 8 '13 at 10:24
  • 2
    Interesting question! You might want to do something with the :after selector, but I'm not sure that would work. Have a look at this: jtauber.github.com/articles/css-hexagon.html
    – reinder
    Feb 8 '13 at 10:28
13

CSS3 Gradients can do the trick:

Try this, Here's a Fiddle.

div {
  background: #c00;
  /* fallback */
  background: -moz-linear-gradient(45deg, transparent 10px, #c00 10px), -moz-linear-gradient(135deg, transparent 10px, #c00 10px), -moz-linear-gradient(225deg, transparent 10px, #c00 10px), -moz-linear-gradient(315deg, transparent 10px, #c00 10px);
  background: -o-linear-gradient(45deg, transparent 10px, #c00 10px), -o-linear-gradient(135deg, transparent 10px, #c00 10px), -o-linear-gradient(225deg, transparent 10px, #c00 10px), -o-linear-gradient(315deg, transparent 10px, #c00 10px);
  background: -webkit-linear-gradient(45deg, transparent 10px, #c00 10px), -webkit-linear-gradient(135deg, transparent 10px, #c00 10px), -webkit-linear-gradient(225deg, transparent 10px, #c00 10px), -webkit-linear-gradient(315deg, transparent 10px, #c00 10px);
}

div {
  background-position: bottom left, bottom right, top right, top left;
  -moz-background-size: 50% 50%;
  -webkit-background-size: 50% 50%;
  background-size: 50% 50%;
  background-repeat: no-repeat;
}


/* Ignore the CSS from this point, it's just to make the demo more presentable */

div {
  float: left;
  width: 50px;
  margin: 15px auto;
  padding: 15px;
  color: white;
  line-height: 1.5;
}
<div>Div 1</div>
<div>Div 2</div>

1
11

Here's a way, although it does have some shortcomings, like no borders and it isn't transparent:

.left,
.right {
  width: 100px;
  height: 100px;
  float: left;
  position: relative;
}

.left {
  background: lightpink;
}

.right {
  background: lightblue;
}

.right::after,
.left::after {
  width: 0px;
  height: 0px;
  background: #fff;
  content: '';
  position: absolute;
  bottom: 0;
}

.right::after {
  left: 0;
  border-top: 10px solid lightblue;
  border-right: 10px solid lightblue;
  border-left: 10px solid white;
  border-bottom: 10px solid white;
}

.left::after {
  right: 0;
  border-top: 10px solid lightpink;
  border-right: 10px solid white;
  border-left: 10px solid lightpink;
  border-bottom: 10px solid white;
}
<div class="left"></div>
<div class="right"></div>

RESULT:

enter image description here

Here's a fiddle.

1
  • A worthwhile update to this as shown in this instructional demo page employs the use of transparent as a color name for the "border" cutout. CSS example: border-bottom:30px solid transparent;. Enjoy!
    – Slink
    Jun 5 '14 at 17:15
8

This is also possible using "clip-path".

-webkit-clip-path: polygon(20% 0%, 80% 0%, 100% 20%, 100% 80%, 80% 100%, 20% 100%, 0% 80%, 0% 20%);
clip-path: polygon(20% 0%, 80% 0%, 100% 20%, 100% 80%, 80% 100%, 20% 100%, 0% 80%, 0% 20%);

div {
  width: 200px;
  height: 200px;
  background: red;
  -webkit-clip-path: polygon(20% 0%, 80% 0%, 100% 20%, 100% 80%, 80% 100%, 20% 100%, 0% 80%, 0% 20%);
  clip-path: polygon(20% 0%, 80% 0%, 100% 20%, 100% 80%, 80% 100%, 20% 100%, 0% 80%, 0% 20%);
}
<div></div>

Source Codepen

Support for clip-path can be found here... http://caniuse.com/#search=clip-path

2
  • This is my favourite way to do it, just be aware it's not supported in IE currently. Jun 17 '16 at 6:58
  • 2
    Yes true, but to be "unsupported" just means it falls back to the original image shape. Quite a graceful fallback, and a nice easy way to get the effect.
    – Collins
    Jun 17 '16 at 7:06
3

This is what you need, transparency and everything

.left,
.right {
  width: 100px;
  height: 100px;
  float: left;
  position: relative;
  overflow: hidden;
}

.right::after,
.left::after {
  content: '';
  width: 200px;
  height: 200px;
  position: absolute;
  -moz-transform: rotate(45deg);
  -webkit-transform: rotate(45deg);
  -o-transform: rotate(45deg);
  -ms-transform: rotate(45deg);
  transform: rotate(45deg);
}

.right::after {
  background: lightblue;
  left: -40px;
  top: -100px;
}

.left::after {
  background: lightpink;
  left: -60px;
  top: -100px;
}
<div class="left"></div>
<div class="right"></div>

2
2

A good The best way to archive this: border-images. In combination with .svg a good solution...

1

I first tested @thordarson solution with position: 'absolute'.

position: 'absolute',
top: '2.9rem',
left: '2.6rem',
borderLeft: '1rem solid #6CAEC6',
borderBottom: '0.7rem solid white',

This worked fine on most devices as shown in the first picture but when used on iPhones or tablets weird lines started showing up:

enter image description here

enter image description here

enter image description here

As @Collins answer I then started using clip-path: polygon but I had quite a hard time getting the correct shapes. I then found a site that really helped me:

https://bennettfeely.com/clippy/

They offer ready shapes that can then be dragged to a desired shape.

enter image description here

For the corner that I needed I could then copy the correct values from the website.

enter image description here

A requirement for us was a 35° angle and to get that right I used the site:

https://www.ginifab.com/feeds/angle_measurement/

enter image description here

I have no affiliation with any of the sites, they just really helped me get what I wanted. With clip-path: polygon and -webkit-clip-path: polygon it worked on all devices and browsers that we had as a requirement.

Compatibility check:

https://caniuse.com/#feat=css-clip-path

0

++ Includes Westworld Style UI in CSS ++

I've updated AlphaMale's awesome answer to hack chamfered borders as originally requested. It basically uses one chamfered div with a slightly smaller on inside it. The outer div's background colour becomes the border colour when the rest of it is covered up by the inner div with matching chamfers.

Tested in Edge, Chrome and Firefox.

I found this page while looking to duplicate something like the Westworld User Interface which has unequal chamfered corners. See the JS fiddle for how I've cobbled this together along with a colour scheme and example box from the Westworld speech chaining scene.

Code on JSFiddle (CSS below): http://jsfiddle.net/S2nqK/345/

Westworld UI pic at: https://qph.ec.quoracdn.net/main-qimg-44c9f03b2abfe9f3833763eece1b0cc4?convert_to_webp=true

body {background-color: #353535;
font-family: 'Open Sans';}
.div-outer {

 /* Chrome / Safari */
    background:
        -webkit-linear-gradient(45deg,  transparent 0px, #6ea1a1 0px), /* bottom left */
        -webkit-linear-gradient(135deg, transparent 14px, #6ea1a1 14px), /* bottom right */
        -webkit-linear-gradient(225deg, transparent 0px, #6ea1a1 0px), /* top right */
        -webkit-linear-gradient(315deg, transparent 5px, #6ea1a1 5px); /* top left */

    /* Firefox */
        background:
        -moz-linear-gradient(45deg,  transparent 0px, #6ea1a1 0px), /* bottom left */
        -moz-linear-gradient(135deg, transparent 14px, #6ea1a1 14px), /* bottom right */
        -moz-linear-gradient(225deg, transparent 0px, #6ea1a1 0px), /* top right */
        -moz-linear-gradient(315deg, transparent 5px, #6ea1a1 5px); /* top left */

     /* Opera */
        background:
        -o-linear-gradient(45deg,  transparent 0px, #6ea1a1 0px), /* bottom left */
        -o-linear-gradient(135deg, transparent 14px, #6ea1a1 14px), /* bottom right */
        -o-linear-gradient(225deg, transparent 0px, #6ea1a1 0px), /* top right */
        -o-linear-gradient(315deg, transparent 5px, #6ea1a1 5px); /* top left */


   padding: 2px;
   color: #fff;

}

.div-inner {


    background:
        -webkit-linear-gradient(45deg,  transparent 0px, #000 0px),
        -webkit-linear-gradient(135deg, transparent 14px, #000 14px),
        -webkit-linear-gradient(225deg, transparent 0px, #000 0px),
        -webkit-linear-gradient(315deg, transparent 5px, #000 5px);

         background:
        -moz-linear-gradient(45deg,  transparent 0px, #000 0px),
        -moz-linear-gradient(135deg, transparent 14px, #000 14px),
        -moz-linear-gradient(225deg, transparent 0px, #000 0px),
        -moz-linear-gradient(315deg, transparent 5px, #000 5px);

         background:
        -o-linear-gradient(45deg,  transparent 0px, #000 0px),
        -o-linear-gradient(135deg, transparent 14px, #000 14px),
       -o-linear-gradient(225deg, transparent 0px, #000 0px),
        -o-linear-gradient(315deg, transparent 5px, #000 5px);


   padding: 10px;

   height: 92px;
   text-align: center;
}


.div-outer, .div-inner {
    background-position: bottom left, bottom right, top right, top left;
    -moz-background-size: 50% 50%;
    -webkit-background-size: 50% 50%;
    background-size: 50% 50%;
    background-repeat: no-repeat;
}

.contain {
   width: 180px;
}
.title {background-color: #76ffff; 
  padding: 6px;
  color: #000;
  border-radius: 2px;
  font-weight: bold;
 text-align-last: justify;
 text-align: justify;
  }
.font-large {font-size: 34pt;}
.font-tiny {font-size: 10pt;}
.cyan {color: #76ffff;}
/* Ignore the CSS from this point, it's just to make the demo more presentable */

.arrow-right {
  width: 0; 
  height: 0; 
  border-top: 8px solid transparent;
  border-bottom: 8px solid transparent;
  border-left: 8px solid #fff;
  display: inline-block;
  vertical-align: middle;
}


p:first-of-type { margin-top: 0 }
p:last-of-type { margin-bottom: 0}
1
  • FYI, in Chrome at least, odd-pixel heights and widths result in a line down the middle of the div with the chamfer. Someone smarter than me will have to see if they can fix that!
    – Casual Bob
    Mar 1 '17 at 15:19
0

Ok, so I made a JS library to automate creating chamfered borders. It has two methods for creating the chamfers:

Method 1: it creates a chamfered background using Canvas API and set it as the CSS background-image of the element.

Method 2: it appends 4 CSS based triangle DOM elements around the target, making the chamfer.

You will stick with method 1 when you can let the library set the background-image, and you will need method 2 when your target already has a background, like in <img>'s.

The usage is simple, just call ChamferBg for using method 1, or ChamferEnvelop to use method 2:

var el = document.getElementById('box');
ChamferBg(el, {
    size: 20,
    sw: 6,
    sc: '#447aec',
    fc: '#21ceff',
    tl: false,
    br: false,
    resize_observe: true
});

The options and their defaults are:

{
    size: 5,    // chamfer size
    sw: 1,      // stroke width
    sc: 'black',    // stroke color,
    fc: undefined,  // fill color
    fp: undefined,  // URL of an image to use as fill pattern

    tl: true,   // chamfer top-left corner?
    tr: true,   // chamfer top-right corner?
    bl: true,   // chamfer bottom-left corner?
    br: true,   // chamfer bottom-right corner?

    resize_observe: false
    // turn on resize_observe observer?
    // this will observer whenever the element
    // resizes and will refresh the background
}

You will need to set resize_observe to true if you use method 1 and your element may change its size at runtime, because then it will need to recreate the chamfered background every time it resizes.

3
  • 2
    Just linking to your own library or tutorial is not a good answer. Linking to it, explaining why it solves the problem, providing code on how to do so and disclaiming that you wrote it makes for a better answer. See: What signifies “Good” self promotion?
    – Paul Roub
    Jan 17 '18 at 18:01
  • @Ramon At least state your connection to MISoftware and the Chamfer.js library/script when promoting it at SO...
    – agrm
    Jan 17 '18 at 18:23
  • Guys, hope it is now a useful answer. If there is someway I could improve it, let me know...
    – Ramon
    Jan 26 '18 at 12:49

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